Loading...
Item 1 - Open SLO Temporary use of Public ROW for Social Distancing and Economic Recovery City Council/Disaster Council Agenda Report Department Name: Public Works Cost Center: 5010 For Agenda of: May 22, 2020 Placement: Business Estimated Time: 20 Minutes FROM: Derek Johnson, City Manager Prepared By: Luke Schwartz, Transportation Manager SUBJECT: OPEN SLO – TEMPORARY USE OF CITY RIGHT-OF-WAY TO FACILITATE SOCIAL DISTANCING AND SUPPORT COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY RECOMMENDATION 1. Receive summary report (Attachment A) and staff presentation on “Open SLO”, a proposed program to support temporary use of City right-of-way to facilitate physical distancing and re-opening of restaurants and other local businesses; and 2. Provide feedback and direction to staff regarding implementation of Open SLO program; and 3. Adopt a Resolution (Attachment B) authorizing the City Manager to implement the Open SLO program, which shall include temporary strategies for use of City right-of-way to facilitate social distancing and COVID-19 economic recovery. DISCUSSION Background The Covid-19 pandemic has created two disasters: a public health crisis and unprecedented economic impacts. This is clearly evident in the City of San Luis Obispo, as local businesses have been devastated economically by this event, especially restaurants, hotels and retail establishments within the City’s Downtown Core—the economic and cultural hub of the city. The current situation creates both a significant challenge for the City with an urgent need support the economic recovery of our local businesses, as well as a unique oppor tunity to re-imagine how our public right-of-way can be utilized to improve short-term and long-term community vibrancy, health and economic vitality. The City’s Incident Action Plan includes the following specific objective on this topic: Develop a plan to use the public right-of-way, sidewalks, and streets to help maintain social distancing during the first phases (stages) of reopening for uses such as walking space, outdoor dining, and pick-up/delivery areas. This staff report presents the components of this plan—herein referred to as “Open SLO”—for Council consideration and approval for implementation. Item 1 Packet Page 1 Over the past several weeks as the County and City have been looking ahead to a phased reopening of local restaurant and retail commerce, several community stakeholders, including Councilmembers, City staff, downtown business representatives and urban designers, have worked collaboratively to develop creative solutions to help facilitate communitywide physical distancing, while reestablishing the City’s once thriving downtown dining and retail environment. The outcome of this collaborative effort is an action plan, which is provided as Attachment A, and summarized in the following sections. Open SLO Program – Summary of Key Goals, Considerations and Strategies Goals 1. Support the health and safety of all residents, customers, and employees 2. Support economic recovery by expanding public space available for outdoor dining capacity, retail curbside pickup and customer queuing to allow for physical distancing during phased reopening 3. Ensure equitable access for all businesses 4. Deploy temporary and “quick-build” street improvements to activate streets and improve community safety and access to active transportation 5. Provide for safe flow of all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists and drivers 6. Implement a well-crafted pilot program with potential for long-term expansion of outdoor dining and activated streets Key Considerations 1. Public safety access, including retaining clear width for fire response, coordinating closely with law enforcement and emergency response providers 2. Parking capacity and loading zones, including ADA, drop-off/pick-up areas 3. Downtown circulation with Marsh Street Bridge Closure 4. Coordination with Farmer’s Market (when able resume) 5. Regulatory Compliance, including building code, ADA, State and County Health requirements, ABC, encroachment permits 6. Equitable benefit to local businesses 7. Public communication and education 8. Physical distancing requirements and guidelines 9. Costs to City (installation, street cleaning, stormwater management, maintenance, operations, staffing, etc.) 10. Alignment with other city goals and plans (Downtown Concept Plan, Multimodal Transportation, Climate Action) Strategies The Open SLO program consists of six (6) primary strategies, which are briefly outlined below. Item 1 Packet Page 2 1. Temporary Street Closures a. Short-term (i.e. Friday afternoon thru Sunday) street closures downtown to create temporary pedestrian plazas for walking, biking, outdoor dining and physical distancing. b. Proposed Pilot Locations • Higuera Street (Osos to Nipomo) – retaining side-street traffic flows during Marsh Street Bridge Closure • Monterey Street (Chorro to Osos) – serves as extension of Mission Plaza, planned for future pedestrianized street per Downtown Concept Plan • Potential to expand to other downtown streets based on results of initial pilot locations c. Provides immediate opportunity for outdoor dining capacity while maintaining safe physical distancing. d. Businesses able to reserve dedicated space for outdoor dining through existing sidewalk dining encroachment permit application. e. With streets closed to car traffic, City to prioritize nearest side-street parking for quick turnover parking needs (restaurant take-out, passenger loading, curbside retail pickup, deliveries, ADA parking.) 2. Use of Mission Plaza and Parking Lots for Outdoor Dining a. Utilize Mission Plaza and other City-owned surface parking lots at set times (i.e. Weeknights, Friday afternoon thru Sunday) for broad public use, including tables and chairs for “to-go” dining, space for retail booths, small arts and culture pop-ups. b. Proposed Pilot Locations • Mission Plaza • Lot 10 (near Old SLO BBQ) c. Provides immediate opportunity for outdoor dining capacity while maintaining safe physical distancing. d. Potential for use of selected parking areas within privately-owned parking lots for outdoor dining use via previously approved temporary relaxation of City enforcement of on-site parking requirements for private development. 3. Parklet Pilot Program a. Convert selected on-street parking spaces downtown to “parklets”, which serve as extensions of sidewalk for outdoor dining space, outdoor queueing for retail shopping, or other pedestrian uses. Item 1 Packet Page 3 b. Propose 4 to 5 locations downtown for pilot installations. Specific locations to be determined based on local business interest and community feedback. c. City to fund and install parklets; allow private use/encroachment for outdoor dining via existing permitting process. d. Designs to follow traffic safety best practices and State/County Health Department guidance for physical distancing and sanitation. e. Potential for future expansion to areas outside of downtown core based on results of initial pilot installations. f. Allows “test” of parklets for future permanent parklet program. 4. Higuera Street Complete Street & Traffic Calming a. Temporarily restripe Higuera (Santa Rosa to Nipomo) to two (2) traffic lanes, converting the outside travel lane to a buffered bike lane. b. Narrower street width reduces traffic speeds, shortens pedestrian crossing exposure, buffers parklets on one side from traffic, and provides more space for active uses. c. Pilot allows “test” of potential long-term configuration as identified in the Downtown Concept Plan prior to summer 2021 downtown roadway resurfacing project. 5. Neighborhood “SLO Streets” a. Temporary partial closure of select neighborhood streets to thru traffic using low-cost temporary traffic control. b. Retains access for local residents, deliveries, emergency response and service vehicles. c. Creates physical distancing space for active transportation uses while conveying reduced speeds and increased caution to motor vehicle drivers. d. Proposed locations – start with streets already identified as future neighborhood greenway routes with potential to expand to other neighborhoods based on community feedback. Suggested routes for initial pilot: • Cerro Romauldo Avenue • Flora Street Item 1 Packet Page 4 • Nipomo Street • Islay Street • Galleon Way & Atascadero Street 6. Pop-ups and Quick-Build Street Activation a. Leverage low-cost opportunities to improve public safety and activate street space for community benefit: • Using sidewalks for merchandise, queueing, art and cultural pop-up exhibits • Painted bulbouts, planter boxes & street murals • Opportunities for quick-build protected bike lanes using low-cost temporary materials while traffic levels and parking demand are low b. Explore grant funding options and opportunities to work with community groups & neighborhood volunteers. The City of San Luis Obispo is not alone in exploring these strategies, as many cities throughout the country have already implemented similar programs to expand the use of public right-of-way for physical distancing and economic recovery. See Attachment D for a list of other communities that have already initiated programs involving street closures, pop-up outdoor dining, and quick- build active transportation improvements. See Attachment A for a more detailed summary report describing the Open SLO program strategies, as well as the staff presentation on the Open SLO program (Attachment C). Process and Approach 1. Duration: The program would be in place up to one year, then would be re-evaluated for extension and/or consideration for permanent installation of specific elements. In-street features will need to be removed in conjunction with the summer 2021 downtown paving project. Consideration for any permanent features would go through appropriate approval processes consistent with applicable City policies, codes, and ordinances. 2. Encroachment: Use of public right-of-way for outdoor dining or other commercial activities would be processed through the City’s existing encroachment permit processes. Utilizing the existing City Ordinance 5.50 (Sidewalk Cafes), interested businesses would enter into an agreement with the City to utilize public space for outdoor dining or retail purposes. Fees would be waived for this one-year pilot. The City would provide traffic control, parklet materials and installation (platform, rail and street improvements) at no cost to the business. Businesses would be responsible for tables, chairs, décor, sanitation, and maintenance of facilities. 3. Regulatory Compliance for Outdoor Dining: The City is working with the County Health Department and Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) to help local business with a streamlined understanding of the application and permitting process for expansion of existing dining areas and extension of ABC permits held by individual businesses to cover the outdoor seating and potential beverage sales on City property. Item 1 Packet Page 5 4. Communication: Marketing and communication will need to be thoughtful and strategic. Values to communicate will include health and safety, economic recovery, community connection and supporting personal choices. Prior to implementation of any program elements, City staff will distribute surveys to invite the public and downtown business owners to provide feedback and help guide how the program is executed. 5. Costs & Funding: City to fund temporary traffic control, parklet materials and installation, tables, chairs and street furniture for public use, and quick-build improvements. FY2020-21 Supplemental Budget, which is scheduled for Council consideration in early June, will include a $200,000 capital improvement project request to fund this program. Staff will explore opportunities for grant funding and partnerships with community groups to fund improvements where feasible. It is important to note that while this report and its accompanying materials outline specific plans and strategies to be implemented as part of the Open SLO program, this will naturally be an iterative process, with constant refinements and adjustments based on Council and community feedback, emerging issues and modifications to public health regulations, and based on ongoing monitoring and observations of elements that are working well and those that require further adjustments. Next Steps If supported by the Council, staff will immediately proceed with targeted community outreach and logistical planning to support rapid implementation based on public feedback and current State and County guidance. The first-priority action will be planning for temporary street closures to allow for immediate expansion of outdoor dining capacity and physical distance for pedestrians within the downtown core. Other program strategies would be implemented incrementally based on funding, staffing resources and community support. Policy Context As discussed above and as described in detail in the attached resolution (Attachment B), the strategies proposed in the Open SLO program would be implemented as temporary installations pursuant to applicable existing City policies, codes, and ordinances. Any installations or improvements placed within the City right-of-way would require design review and approval by the City Engineer, and follow existing encroachment permitting processes under the City’s Sidewalk Dining Ordinance. The City retains the right to revoke or suspend any encroachment permits and will continue enforcement of conditions or activities that pose a thread to public health, safety, or welfare, including compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act. As described in Attachment B, during this temporary program, the City reserves the right for flexible interpretation of Sections of Chapter 5.50 (Sidewalk Cafes) of the Municipal Code to allow for streamlined processing of encroachment permit requests, waiving of fees associated with administrative approval of sidewalk dining permits, waiving of additional parking requirements associated with outdoor expansion of restaurant/retail uses, and streamlined review of temporary architectural and aesthetic elements of sidewalk dining areas. Item 1 Packet Page 6 Public Engagement In developing the Open SLO plan, Downtown SLO solicited preliminary feedback from several downtown businesses to gauge general interest in parklets and other outdoor dining/retail opportunities. Results of this preliminary survey are summarized in Attachment A. Prior to proceeding with any of any of the temporary improvements proposed as part of the Open SLO program, staff will be conducting additional online surveys to invite additional public feedback and help guide and fine-tune implementation strategies. Two independent public engagement surveys will be distributed—one focused on downtown businesses and one open to citywide participation. Any program features that may be considered for permanent installation beyond the one-year pilot program will include a public outreach and formal approval process consistent with the City’s Public Engagement and Noticing (PEN) Manual and City Municipal Code. CONCURRENCE The City Attorney’s office, Public Works and Community Development Departments concur with the recommendations contained within this report. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW As a result of the COVID-19 public health emergency, the City of San Luis Obispo proposes this temporary program to use the right-of-way, sidewalks and streets to help maintain social distancing during the first phases (stages) of reopening consistent with the State’s Resilience Roadmap and to provide for residents to receive the health and wellness benefits of being outdoors and support businesses with enough space to safely physically distance. The proposed project is exempt from environmental review pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) as follows: A. The project is statutorily exempt under State CEQA Guidelines Section 15269 (Emergency Projects), because the temporary program includes specific actions that would allow for safe physical distancing consistent with the State’s Resilience Roadmap and County and State Guidelines in order to mitigate the COVID-19 public health emergency. B. The project is categorically exempt under State CEQA Guidelines Section 15301 (Existing Facilities) because the actions identified in the program are limited to the permitting, leasing, and minor alteration of existing public facilities, including existing streets, sidewalks, bicycle and pedestrian trails, which would not result in the creation of additional automobile lanes. The program would result in a negligible expansion of existing commercial uses and a negligible expansion of the public’s use of City right-of- way, as the uses included in the temporary program would not vary from the current uses of commercial businesses, residential areas, or public access within the City’s right -of- way. FISCAL IMPACT Budgeted: No Budget Year: N/A Funding Identified: No Item 1 Packet Page 7 Fiscal Analysis: Funding Sources Current FY Cost Annualized On-going Cost Total Project Cost General Fund State Federal Fees Other: Total There is no direct fiscal impact associated with approval of the Open SLO program at this time. As mentioned above, funding for implementation of the Open SLO program will be included as a new capital improvement project request for allocation of $200,000 as part of the FY2020-21 Supplemental Budget, which is scheduled for Council consideration on June 2, 2020. Indirect fiscal impacts would include potential loss in encroachment permit fee revenues with the temporary waiver of sidewalk dining permit fees during this pilot program and costs associated with City staff resources committed to implementing the program. Existing staffing resources already approved under the currently adopted financial plan are expected to be sufficient to support implementation of this program. ALTERNATIVES Deny or continue this request. The Council could direct staff not to proceed with implementation of the Open SLO program at this time. Council could direct staff to conduct additional research and outreach and continue Council action on this item to a future meeting date. ATTACHMENTS a – Summary Report: City of San Luis Obispo Outdoor Public Space Expansion b – Draft Resolution c – Staff Presentation d – List of Other Cities with COVID-19 Open Street Programs Item 1 Packet Page 8 City of San Luis Obispo Outdoor Public Space Expansion DRAFT A program to support re-opening of restaurants and other businesses May 14, 2020 A.Overview City Incident Action Plan includes the following objective: Develop a plan to use the right-of-way, sidewalks and streets to help maintain social distancing during the first few phases (stages) of reopening for uses such as walking space, outdoor dining and pick-up/delivery areas. This report outlines six strategies that could be used to achieve the objective above. Strategies may be used independently or in combination. Some strategies can be implemented in the near term while implementation of others depends on outside factors including shifts in COVID-19 guidelines, public interest, and available funding. The six strategies are Changes to Traffic Flow; Short-Term Street Closures; Parklets; Use of Parking Lots; Mission Plaza; and Pop-Ups B.Goals 1.Support the health and safety of all residents, customers and employees 2.Expand seating capacity for restaurants to accommodate physical distancing 3.Provide expanded space for outdoor retail, queueing, public seating and other pedestrian-oriented activity to support physical distancing. 4.Ensure equitable access for all businesses 5.Generate enthusiasm and confidence for customers and employees to return to restaurants and retail 6.Provide for the safe flow of all modes of transportation, including cars, bikes and pedestrians 7.Implement a well-crafted pilot program for long-term expansion of outside dining opportunities and activated streets. C.Considerations 1.Public Safety access, including 20’ - 26’ wide access downtown for fire trucks 2.Parking capacity and loading zones, including ADA, drop-off/pick-up areas 3.Vehicular and bike traffic flow (including detour due to Marsh St. bridge); alignment with NACTO and other engineering guidelines 4.Coordination with Farmer’s Market once opened 5.Regulatory Compliance including building code, ADA, health code, ABC, encroachment permits 6.Rainwater management; street cleaning; waste collection; maintenance etc. 7.Public communication and education 8.Physical distancing requirements and guidelines 9.Cost of implementation for barriers, street improvements, operations and maintenance 10.Alignment with sustainability and climate action goals Page 1 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 9 D.Strategies 1.Changes to Traffic Flow Approach: ‘Quick-build’ improvements toward alignment with the Downtown Concept Plan. For example, one lane of Higuera could be converted to a bike lane with buffer. See Appendix A for possible sequence of improvements. Cost: Traffic Control - $30,000-$50,000 total (depends on specific treatments and may be lower if City Streets Maintenance staff can assist with installation) Benefits and Opportunities: A ‘quick-build’ approach would slow traffic in the near term, reduce crossing exposure for pedestrians, and support larger goals of supporting active transportation. The Downtown Concept Plan was developed through a robust public process. A quick build approach would also allow for testing of elements to be incorporated into the next roadway sealing and striping project for Higuera Street, which is planned for summer of 2021. Constraints: Depending on the extent of striping changes, costs could be prohibitive. Downtown streets are already scheduled for repaving beginning June 2021, so major updates to striping could be more cost-effective at that time. 2.Short-term Street Closures Approach: Short-term road closures could be utilized downtown and in other areas of the city. ●For downtown, consider evenings and/or weekends, to provide additional opportunities for retail expansion, cultural events and more space for pedestrian movement. ●Partial closures on low traffic/speed residential streets (local access allowed, closed to thru traffic). Target streets planned for future Neighborhood Greenways (Cerro Romauldo, Nipomo, Islay, Flora, etc.) Page 2 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 10 ●Pop-up protected bike lanes on multilane collector/arterial streets for 6-12 months while traffic levels remain low Costs: Traffic Control - $30,000-$50,000 total (depends on specific treatments and may be lower if City Streets Maintenance staff can assist with installation) Benefits and Opportunities: Street closures provide the most opportunity for creating significant space for physical distancing. With fewer visitors to the area, parking will not be in as high demand, providing opportunity to ‘try out’ different configurations. This would be an ideal opportunity to test out temporary closures on streets like Monterey Street, which is proposed as a future shared pedestrian street, or “woonerf” in the Downtown Concept Plan. Constraints: Many businesses prefer more on-street parking compared to pedestrian traffic; short-term parking and loading zones will be critical to support restaurant and retail and may need to be shifted and/or expanded. Another challenge will be providing adequate staffing to monitor street closure traffic control and allow access for emergency services and commercial deliveries when required. 3.Parklets Approach: Convert selected on-street parking spaces to outdoor dining space or other pedestrian uses. The parking space would be infilled with a platform flush with the sidewalk (a ‘parklet’) in front of interested businesses. The platform would be 6’- 8’ wide by 20’-40’ long on pedestals. A perimeter would enclose the edges, with a rail, planters or other means and appropriate openings along the sidewalk. The entire assembly would be semi-permanent, anticipated to remain in place up to one year but could be relocated, stored or disassembled when not in use. The parklet structure would be owned by the city. Use of the parklet could be: ●Public sidewalk – no improvements other than rail and aesthetic treatments, to create space for pedestrian movement. ●Table and Chair – Utilized by one or more businesses under the city’s “Table & Chair” permit process and designated for exclusive use of the business and appropriate signage. ●Sidewalk Café – Designated parklet controlled by one business under the city’s Sidewalk Café Page 3 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 11 permit process. Alcohol could be served as approved by ABC. Design could include a bike corral installed adjacent to the platform, parking stops at each end set 3-4’ from parklet, flex posts installed along the boundary between parklet and auto traffic lane and speed control. Parklets could be interspersed between parking or loading zones, but no closer to an intersection than 20’. See the NACTO ​guidelines​ and ​Bison​ for additional details and guidelines. Cost: $20,000-$50,000 per installation (varies based on materials, design fees and labor). Benefits and Opportunities: Parklets are a well-established urban device to activate streets and create space for public use and are recommended for consideration in the Downtown Concept Plan. Parklets could support businesses and activate streets for pedestrians and commerce throughout the city. Constraints: Current health department requirements require people to be seated at least 6’ apart, and for the seating area to be separated from the pedestrian thoroughfare by at least 6’ or a 6’-high physical barrier, such as plexiglass. With those constraints, it would be challenging to fit more than 6 – 10 people on a parklet. While parklets could provide immediate value by extending sidewalk space for physical distancing and queuing for curbside pickup customers, they may not provide substantial potential for sidewalk dining in the short term unless health department restrictions are refined. See Appendix B for additional information on parklets and seating. 4.Use of Parking Lots Approach: Enforcement of current off-street parking requirements would be temporarily waived so that selected spaces in private parking lots could be converted to seating or expanded retail space. The City could also permit use of spaces in public parking lots through the Sidewalk Cafes ordinance. The City-owned Lot 10 at the corner of Higuera and Nipomo Street would be an excellent location for an initial pilot project. Costs: $5,000 each for rails and planters, or a grant of that amount to businesses selecting their own improvements. Benefits and Opportunities: Requires little city intervention, and the required resolution was adopted by City Council May 8, 2020. Provides flexibility for any business operation to utilize outdoor space for seating, retail display, queuing space, etc. Provides opportunity to expand areas for outdoor commerce outside of the downtown. Constraints: Could increase congestion of on-street parking in neighborhoods depending on location. Parking modifications would need to retain required ADA parking and access pathways. 5.Activate Mission Plaza Approach: Convert Mission Plaza at set times such as Friday afternoon through Sunday for broad public use including tables and chairs for ‘to-go’ dining, space for outdoor retail booths, art and culture pop-ups, and so on. Consider coordination with closure of Broad St. ‘dog-leg’ and/or Page 4 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 12 sections of Monterey. Continue work with ABC for potential alcohol sales and/or consumption of to-go alcohol. Downtown SLO has applied for a grant Cost: Street Furniture (tables, chairs, etc.) $10,000-20,000, depending on what existing City-owned materials are available. Downtown SLO has applied for a grant to further support this program. Benefits and Opportunities: Mission Plaza is a treasured community space and activation would draw residents downtown for times when concerts aren’t available. Businesses without their own patio or outdoor space could benefit for shared use. Constraints: Operational expenses of set-up and take-down, monitoring and clean-up. Unclear what ABC process would be. Coordination with the Mission. “Too much” success could encourage crowds. Requires wipe down after each individual use. 6.Pop-Ups Approach: This is a catch-all to encourage and support additional ideas for outdoor space such as: ●Develop guidelines and allow use of parts of the sidewalk for signage, merchandise and queueing, where adequate sidewalk width exist ●Develop guidelines and allow for pavement painting and planter box projects initiated by neighborhoods to slow traffic, create painted bulb-outs or other pedestrian-friendly adaptations ●Support ‘traveling’ arts and culture events where exhibits or exhibitions are allowed on public spaces for visitors to stroll by. ●Have designated staff available and a clear process to streamline review and approval Cost: Potential staff time; potential grants for supplies. Benefits and Opportunities: Able to respond deftly to innovations from the community Constraints: Consuming staff time for a ‘one-off’; “too much” success could encourage crowds. E.Process and Approach 1.Duration​: The program would be in place up to one year, then would be re-evaluated May 2021. 2.Encroachment​: Utilizing the existing City Ordinance 5.50 Sidewalk Cafes, interested businesses would enter into an agreement with the city to utilize the public easement (parklet). Fees would be waived for this one-year pilot. The City would provide traffic control, parklet materials Page 5 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 13 (platform, rail and street improvements) at no cost to the business. Businesses would be responsible for tables, chairs and decor. 3.ABC Permit​: The City is working with Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) to standardize and streamline the application for expansion of existing ABC permits held by individual businesses, to cover the outdoor seating on city property. City will cover the current application fee of $380. It’s also possible that the State will develop new streamlined policies in response to COVID-19 and broad community interest. 4.Communication​: Marketing and communication will need to be thoughtful and strategic. Values to communicate will include health and safety, economic recovery, community connection and supporting personal choices. F.Next Steps This report provides several strategies that can be pursued, including “All of the Above” at some level and over time. Initial outreach has indicated enthusiasm for the approach, with some specific concerns on implementation. See Appendix C for a summary of feedback received to date. Due to the novelty and temporary nature of the strategies, and the evolving situation due to COVID-19 and the gradual reopening, there may be benefit to rolling out incremental pieces without developing a comprehensive plan for the entire program. Once allowed by State and County ordinance, an initial approach could be: ●Set a one-day closure of Higuera to cars, allowing cross streets to remain open and Higuera to be pedestrian and bike only. Pickup zones for dining and commercial deliveries may need to be established on nearby side streets in conjunction with road closure. Consider expanding closure to weekends if successful. ●Set up tables and chairs in Mission Plaza for a weekend and partner with restaurants for to-go reservations. Expand street closure to Monterey Street between Chorro and Osos to serve as an expansion of Mission Plaza for outdoor dining and commerce. Consider the possibility for full-time closure of this segment of Monterey Street for a 6-12 month period to a pedestrianized street with street art and other placemaking features, if supported by adjacent businesses. ●Set up seating areas or retail space in City-owned Parking Lot 10 downtown near the Higuera/Nipomo intersection. ●Restripe Higuera Street between Santa Rosa and Nipomo to convert one vehicle travel lane to a buffered bike lane. Explore additional traffic calming strategies including enhanced signage and traffic enforcement. ●Set up partial closures on selected low-traffic/low-speed residential streets to allow more space for pedestrians and cyclists to recreate at a safe distance. Target routes planned for future neighborhood greenways. Start with 2-4 streets and expand to others if City resources and neighborhood support allows. Page 6 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 14 ●Work with one restaurant and one retailer to establish seating areas or retail space in an existing private parking lot. Use those as demonstrations for others. ●Establish 2 parklets downtown and a third elsewhere in the city, working with enthusiastic businesses who would like to take the lead. Potential to expand to additional locations if resources and community support allow. ●Evaluate downtown parking meters and determine if shifts should occur to support long-term parking on the perimeter and quick pick-ups on the central streets. ●Evaluate potential to install temporary protected bike lanes on multi-lane arterial streets to improve safety and connectivity for cyclists while traffic volumes remain low. Install using lower-cost temporary materials as resources allow. The exact combination of strategies is likely not so critical, as any implementation will be one point of many where we demonstrate our strength, compassion and resilience as a community. Acknowledgements We would like to thank the many individuals who contributed to this report. Committee Members include: Industry Volunteers: Jim Duffy, Julia Oberhoff, Ten Over Studio Greg Wynn, Greg Wynn Architecture Rudy Bachmann, Specialty Construction City staff: Luke Schwartz, Chris Read, Shelly Stanwyck, Derek Johnson, Christine Dietrick City Council: Andy Pease Page 7 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 15 Appendix A – Possible Street Closures and Configurations Initial Rollout (in general order of priority/phasing) 1.Downtown Street Closures o Higuera Street (Osos to Nipomo) -- Close Higuera Street to vehicle traffic, retaining side street circulation. Start with one-day pilot, with potential to expand to Friday afternoon through Sundays. o Monterey Street (Chorro to Osos) -- Close Monterey Street to vehicle traffic, retaining side street circulation. Start with one-day or weekend pilot, with potential to expand to full-time closure for several months (if supported by adjacent businesses). o Consider potential for rotating street closures, allowing use of other downtown streets for outdoor dining and pedestrian circulation. o With any closures, prioritize side street parking for quick turnover passenger drop-off, take out/delivery pickup, and commercial loading. 2.Higuera Road Diet (Santa Rosa to Nipomo) o Convert outside travel lane to provide width for buffered bicycle lane and potential future parklet expansion 3.Use of Surface Parking Lots and Public Plazas for Outdoor Commerce o Initiate pilot for use of Mission Plaza and surface parking lots for outdoor dining, retail and commerce. Initial pilot to include Mission Plaza and City-owned Lot 10 near Higuera/Nipomo intersection for outdoor dining and retail. o Allow private businesses/property owners to request permission through a informal consult process to temporarily close portions of privately-owned surface parking lots to expand outdoor dining and retail. 4.SLO Healthy Street Closures o Install temporary traffic control signage to partially close low speed/volume residential streets to thru traffic. Initial pilot to identify 3-5 routes along planned neighborhood greenways, such as Nipomo, Cerro Romauldo, Islay, Galleon/Atascadero, Flora. Program may expand to additional residential streets over time depending on results of pilot installation. o Explore potential for permanents for neighborhood greenway routes using quick-build strategies beyond one-year pilot program. 5.Parklet Program o Initiate pilot, with potential for conversion of on-street parking stalls to parklets at 2-4 locations within the downtown core. Extend program to allow consideration for 1-2 parklets outside of the downtown core if approved by the Public Works Department. o City and Downtown SLO to survey local businesses and citywide community to determine specific locations for potential parklet installation. o Depending on current County Health Department guidelines, parklets may be provided as sidewalk extensions only initially, with potential for outdoor dining through existing City Sidewalk Dining Permit Processes as health restrictions allow. 6.Quick-Build Protected Bike Lanes & Safety Projects Page 8 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 16 o Temporarily convert one vehicle lane in each direction and/or street parking to protected bike lanes along high-speed multi-lane arterial street segments while traffic volumes remain low for next 6-12 months. Identify routes with highest priority in Draft Active Transportation Plan with greatest potential to increase ridership and connect residents with the downtown and other key destinations. Potential candidate streets include South Higuera Street, Foothill Boulevard or south Broad Street. Improvements to be installed via low-cost temporary materials that can be easily removed if needed as travel levels increase over time. o Consider other quick-build pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements that also provide opportunity for public art, such as painted corner bulbouts. Page 9 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 17 Appendix B – Parklets and Seating Seating The following is a sample seating arrangement utilizing ​tables​ that are 6’ apart. Under current COVID-19 restrictions, spacing would need to increase so that ​seated guests ​are 6’ apart. Page 10 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 18 This is a diagram of a 44’-long parklet, showing seated guests 6’ apart, with tables 8’ apart. This arrangement has railing only on the street side of the platform and planters along the sidewalk edge. The locations of the tables and the depth of the planters provides 6’ of buffer between the walkway and the seated guests. Page 11 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 19 This is a diagram of a parking area, showing seated guests 6’ apart, with tables 8’ apart. This arrangement would occupy 10 parking spaces. Parklet Locations In collaboration with Downtown SLO, the City will survey downtown businesses and the citywide community to gauge interest and prioritize potential parking locations. Final locations for pilot installation to be approved by the City based on business/community feedback, feasibility of installation, and geographic distribution. Requests for a pilot parking installation outside of the downtown to be considered on a case-by-case basis. Page 12 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 20 Parklet Costs Dero Parklet system IPE Parklet System (Bison) Page 13 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 21 Appendix C – Community Feedback Surveys of the business community have revealed general support for the concepts, with some specific concerns regarding implementation. The following is an amalgamation of responses. Page 14 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 22 Page 15 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 23 ●Let's make this happen and make our permanent! ●Been dreaming of a parklet in front of Kreuzberg for years!!! Let’s do it! I’ll be first/guinea pig. ●The idea has merit. My biggest concern would be losing commercial parking spaces as this is already a difficult situation for all of our commercial deliveries as we have many new businesses open on Monterey all trying to get deliveries with very limited spots for the drivers. Very difficult for all commercial deliveries. However I think the idea could be good ●Amazing idea love it ●Fantastic idea! Bars should be able to use them as well. Not just restaurants. ●It's hard to say whether or not this would be beneficial. Best case would be to open without restrictions and let people decide whether or not they want to go out or not. ●Closing down Higuera and making it a promenade may be the easiest way to utilize the street in front of businesses. ●I'm not sure the effort and expense would be worth it in the end. The idea of serving tables by walking through pedestrian traffic is to say the least not ideal. How will this effect Farmer's Market? ●I appreciate the thought, but I just don't think that it creates a very desirable experience unless Higuera is completely shutdown and turned into a promenade. ●Another thought is put the tables on the sidewalk and do a bypass sidewalk in the street. This seems like it would be a more functional model. ● I think those parklets look great. I think the public are going to feel great being outside in the fresh air, we would use ours for additional seating. I imagine it would go where our commercial spot and handicap spot are so I’m not sure how that would impact things. ●But at first glance, I would say it’s definitely worth pursuing! ●For Higuera—I’m concerned with the speed of traffic—Many streets in SF have these, including Valencia St in the Mission—but I think Higuera with one way traffic is very dangerous unless speed limit is drastically lowered. And that speed limit is enforced. Also: Because of bars and restaurants on Higuera—there are a lot of delivery trucks. They often park in the far right or far left hand lanes while unloading as there is not enough parking even in yellow zones. ●homeless —they have and use all of Mission Plaza and take over the benches on Higuera—-there would need to be signage and law enforcement to prevent homeless people from taking them over and hanging out. ●I think if it is to help restaurants—then they should be in front of restaurants without patios. Page 16 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 24 ●We expect for a continued period of time (likely at least 12 months) that many customers will continue to utilize curbside pickup for takeout food. Where would these cars be able to stop/park to take continue taking advantage of this service? This revenue will remain extremely important to restaurants until the public returns to normal dining behavior. Page 17 ATTACHMENT A Item 1 Packet Page 25 R ______ RESOLUTION NO. _____ (2020 SERIES) A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA APPROVING THE CITY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE EXPANSION TEMPORARY COVID-19 BUSINESS SUPPORT AND RECOVERY PROGRAM TO FACILITATE COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC HEALTH ORDERS AND TO MITIGATE ECONOMIC IMPACTS BY SUPPORTING LOCAL BUSINESSES AND RESTAURANTS WHEREAS, section 2.24.060 of the Municipal Code empowers the Emergency Services Director to request that the City Council proclaim a local emergency when the City of San Luis Obispo is affected or likely to be affected by a public calamity and the City Council proclaimed a local emergency at its regular meeting on March 17, 2020 regarding the COVID-19 pandemic and proclaimed the continuation of local emergency at its regular meetings of April 7, 2020 and May 8, 2020; and WHEREAS, the Secretary of Health and Human Services Director issued a Determination that a Public Health Emergency exists and has existed of January 27, 2020; and WHEREAS, the President of the United States has declared a State of National Emergency; the Governor of the State of California has proclaimed a State of Emergency for the State of California and issued Executive Orders and direction regarding measures to mitigate the spread of cases of COVID-19 within the State of California; the San Luis Obispo County Emergency Services Director has proclaimed a local emergency; and the San Luis Obispo County Public Health Director has declared a public health emergency related the spread of cases of COVID-19 within the State of California and all recitals set forth therein, are included as though fully set forth herein; and WHEREAS, on March 18, 2020 the San Luis Obispo County Emergency Services Director issued Local Emergency Order and Regulation No. 4 providing for mandatory shelter at home regulations; and WHEREAS, on March 19, 2020, the Governor issued Executive Order N-33-20, including the Order of the State Public Health Officer mandating all individuals living in the State of California to stay home or at their place of residence except as needed to maintain continuity of operations of the federal critical infrastructure sectors; and WHEREAS, on May 4, 2020, the Governor issued Executive Order N-60-20, directing all residents of California to continue to obey State public health directives, as made available at http://covid19. Ca.gov/stay-home-except-for-essential-needs/ and elsewhere as the State Public Health Officer may provide; and ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 26 Resolution No. ______ (2020 Series) Page 2 R ______ WHEREAS, on May 16, 2020, San Luis Obispo County Local Emergency Order and Regulation No. 4 expired by its own terms and both the County and the City of San Luis Obispo remain subject to stay at home and business operations regulation under Executive Order N-60- 20, as well as County of San Luis Obispo Local Emergency Order and Regulation No. 6 COVID- 19 Restricting the Use of Short-Term Lodging Facilities; and WHEREAS, the City of San Luis Obispo will be required to help enforce all restrictions imposed by the State of California and by the County of San Luis Obispo acting as the health agency; and WHEREAS, the County Emergency Services Director and Public Health Officer have evaluated the continuing public health threat and determined the need for continuing regulations of personal and business activities at the state level and of local short term lodging and eviction protections, as well as compliance with state orders, at the local level and to mitigate the continuing spread of the COVID-19 pandemic within the County; and WHEREAS, the pandemic COVID-19 continues to present an present and imminent threat to public health worldwide and in the U.S., resulting in serious present illness or death or an immediate risk thereof to vulnerable populations, including the elderly and those with underlying health conditions; and WHEREAS, heightened levels of public health and safety planning and preparedness have been necessitated in preparation for and response to confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the County of San Luis Obispo, and rapid response not lending itself to otherwise applicable notice and approval timelines has been and will be necessary to respond to the rapidly evolving pandemic and its related, significant economic impacts, and to mitigate against the spread or resurgence of COVID-19 and its resulting mental and physical health, social, and economic impacts, compromising the public health and safety; and WHEREAS, in the absence of such actions, an escalation of the spread remains an imminent threat; and WHEREAS, the pandemic and necessary federal, state and local public health orders requiring social distancing to prevent spread of COVID-19 have had and will continue to have devastating economic impacts on the local community, including residents, businesses, employees and City operations; and WHEREAS, the City has instituted its Fiscal Health Contingency Plan in order to mitigate against economic impacts of emergency response costs and significant revenue reductions and has made drastic reductions to current and projected city costs through reductions in purchasing, limits on hiring, and furloughs of temporary and supplemental staff; and ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 27 Resolution No. ______ (2020 Series) Page 3 R ______ WHEREAS, due to the severe economic impacts of COVID-19 and its economic impacts on the community and the City organization, the Council deems it necessary to suspend enforcement of certain provisions of the City of San Luis Obispo Municipal Code specified below to support social distancing requirements, effective public communication related to rapidly transitioning business re-opening status, and economic viability of businesses in adhering to permitted opening and social distancing requirements; and WHEREAS, Article 14, Section 8630, of the California Emergency Services Act requires that the City Council review the need for continuing the Local Emergency at least every sixty (60) days until such Local Emergency is terminated; and WHEREAS, the below measures are intended to provide economic relief to businesses that are experiencing economic uncertainty while complying with State and County Orders. Accordingly, the City will facilitate a temporary “pilot” program, which will include the development and implementation of a plan to use the right-of-way, sidewalks and streets to help maintain social distancing during the first few phases (stages) of reopening consistent with the State’s Resilience Roadmap and continued economic support of businesses for uses such as walking space, outdoor dining, and pick-up/delivery areas. The program would provide for residents to receive the health and wellness benefits of being outdoors and support businesses with enough space to safely physically distance. WHEREAS, the program is established for the purpose of supporting and facilitating the recovery of business and economic activity in the City by expanding the spaces available for the safe conduct of such activities for City businesses and their customers and patrons to create more physical distance for pedestrians and business patrons to maintain physical distancing; and nothing herein is intended to nor shall be deemed to create open gathering places or public fora unrelated to the intended business support and recovery purpose WHEREAS, time is of the essence to quickly implement a program to allow for safe physical distancing consistent with the State’s Resilience Roadmap and County Guidelines in order to address both public health and economic impacts of COVID-19, as residents have been primarily indoors since the initiation of the State and County Orders, this will be a dynamic temporary program, receiving input from the City Council, and shall be subject to administrative modification by the City, as authorized herein, as necessary in response to emerging issues or concerns of public, health, safety or convenience. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT PROCLAIMED AND RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of San Luis Obispo that: SECTION 1. All recitals set forth above, and all recitals included in support of Federal, State and County actions referenced herein, are adopted as though fully set forth herein as findings in support of this Resolution and, after considering all such findings and current local circumstances the Council hereby declares the continuing existence of a local emergency related to the continued threat of COVID-19 as it relates to public health and economic impacts; and ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 28 Resolution No. ______ (2020 Series) Page 4 R ______ SECTION 2. City of San Luis Obispo Outdoor Public Space Program (OPEN SLO). In order to support the re-opening of restaurants and other businesses in accordance with the State Executive Order N-60-20, the City Council hereby directs and authorizes the City Manager to implement the OPEN SLO program, which shall include the following six strategies that may be used independently or in combination, along with continued implementation of the Sidewalk Dining Ordinance, as outlined below: A. Six Strategies Identified in the OPEN SLO Pilot Program: 1. Changes to traffic flow, including “Quick-build” improvements toward alignment with the Downtown Concept Plan. 2. Short-term street closures, including short-term road closures in the Downtown and in other areas of the City to facilitate safely distanced pedestrian circulation, expanded outdoor dining, and customer queuing, pickup and waiting areas associated with permitted business activities. 3. Conversion of selected on-street parking spaces to outdoor dining space or other pedestrian uses (parklets); use of the parklet may include: i. Public sidewalk. No improvements other than rail and aesthetic treatments, to create space for safely distanced pedestrian movement and customer queuing, pickup, and waiting areas associated with permitted business activities. ii. Table and Chair. Utilized by one or more businesses under the City’s “Table & Chair” permit process and designated for exclusive use of the business, which may include appropriate signage. 1. Appropriate signage means no more than 15 square feet per outdoor area. iii. Sidewalk Café. Designated parklet for exclusive use by one business under the City’s Sidewalk Café permit process. 4. Use of private and public parking lots for expansion of commercial uses. Enforcement of current off-street parking requirements would be temporarily suspended so that selected spaces in private parking lots could be converted to seating or expanded retail space. The City could also permit use of spaces in public parking lots through the Sidewalk Cafes Ordinance. 5. Conversion of Mission Plaza at set days and times for community and economic recovery support uses, including tables and chairs for ‘to-go’ dining, space for outdoor retail booths, art and culture pop-ups, which may include the closure of the Broad Street ‘dog-leg’ and/or sections of Monterey Street. 6. Pop-ups to encourage and support additional ideas for outdoor space such as: i. Develop guidelines and allow use of parts of the sidewalk for signage, merchandise and queueing, where adequate sidewalk width exists consistent with disabled access requirements and public safety. ii. Develop guidelines and allow for pavement painting and planter box projects initiated by neighborhoods to slow traffic, create painted bulb-outs or other pedestrian-friendly adaptations. iii. Support ‘traveling’ arts and culture events where exhibits or exhibitions are allowed on public spaces for visitors to stroll by. iv. Have designated staff available and a clear process to streamline review and approval of uses to ensure conformity with access and public health and safety regulations. ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 29 Resolution No. ______ (2020 Series) Page 5 R ______ B. Support Expansion of Sidewalk Dining in Support of Social Distancing through application of the existing Sidewalk Dining Ordinance. For purposes of the temporary program support and only for such period of time as such temporary program remains in effect the following Sections of Chapter 5.50, Sidewalk Cafes, of the Municipal Code shall be interpreted and applied as follows: 5.50.015: Permits Required. The encroachment permit process shall be used for the purpose of evaluating, establishing conditions applicable to, and approving all requests for revocable sidewalk cafés permits, and tables and chairs permits, while the temporary program is in place. 5.50.020: Architectural review. The Community Development Director shall use discretion conferred by this section to process permit requests without a separate application for architectural review and without public notice as may be otherwise specified by section 5.50.035 or other City policy, unless required by state law. 5.50.030: Fees. Fees associated with administrative approval of permits under this chapter for permits shall be suspended while the temporary program is in place. 5.50.045.C: Required Operational Standards (Parking). No additional parking will be required for permits approved under this chapter while the temporary program is in place. 5.50.045.G: (Umbrellas, Awnings and street furniture) Community Development Director may allow great flexibility with respect to the design and appearance of outdoor furniture and barriers, consistent with standards for the protection of public health and safety and subject to the approval of the City Engineer. 5.50.050.A: Terms and expiration. Sidewalk café permits approved while the temporary program is in place will not be approved for an unlimited term and shall specify an automatic expiration date, unless subsequently renewed. ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 30 Resolution No. ______ (2020 Series) Page 6 R ______ 5.50.060.A: Revocation or Suspension of Permit The City retains the right to revoke or suspend the permit upon twenty-four hours’ notice to the sidewalk café operator for any cause, regardless of conformance with the provisions of the Sidewalk Dining Ordinance. 17.70.100.F.1: Lighting and Night Sky Preservation Exemptions Low-intensity outdoor lighting fixtures used for architectural decoration may be installed without Architectural Review, provided it shall not otherwise create a nuisance or hazard for passing motorists, pedestrians, cyclists or other modes of transportation, subject to the approval of the City Engineer. SECTION 3. No facility, structure or improvement may be erected, constructed or placed in the City Right of Way without the express written approval of the City Engineer and nothing herein is intended to or shall be interpreted to convey any vested right in or to the continued use or occupation of public or private property permitted, allowed or suffered by the City pursuant to the temporary program herein. SECTION 4. Continuing Enforcement of Conditions or Activities Posing a Threat to Public Health, Safety or Welfare; Continued Enforcement of Permit Requirements for Electrical, Plumbing, or Structural Components or Appurtenances and Encroachments into Public Right of Way. Nothing herein is intended to or shall be deemed to relieve any person from the obligation to obtain, or prohibit code enforcement for failure to obtain, any permits that would otherwise be required under state law, the San Luis Obispo Municipal Code, or building and safety codes adopted thereunder, including but not limited to: A. Permits otherwise required for electrical, plumbing, or structural work performed within the City. B. Encroachment permits required for structures, uses and/or activities within the public right of way, which may be issued at no cost by the City to facilitate physical distancing and the reopening of businesses. Further, nothing herein is intended to or shall permit or allow the erection or placement of any permanent or temporary structure or improvement, on public or private property in violation of any state or federal accessibility law, including the Americans With Disabilities Act, or to prohibit or suspend code enforcement action deemed necessary by the Chief Building Official, the City Engineer or any other authorized enforcement official of the City, to remedy or abate: a dangerous condition or activity; any activity presenting an imminent threat of harm to the health, safety or welfare of the community; any violation of state or federal accessibility law; or any unauthorized activity on private property or in the public right of way. ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 31 Resolution No. ______ (2020 Series) Page 7 R ______ SECTION 5. Environmental Review. As a result of the COVID-19 public health emergency, the City of San Luis Obispo proposes a temporary program to use the right-of-way, sidewalks and streets to help maintain social distancing during the first few phases (stages) of reopening consistent with the State’s Resilience Roadmap and provide for residents to receive the health and wellness benefits of being outdoors and support businesses with enough space to safely physically distance. The proposed project is exempt from environmental review pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) as followed: A. The project is statutorily exempt under State CEQA Guidelines Section 15269 (Emergency Projects), because the temporary program includes specific actions that would allow for safe physical distancing consistent with the State’s Resilience Roadmap and County and State Guidelines in order to mitigate the COVID-19 public health emergency. B. The project is categorically exempt under State CEQA Guidelines Section 15301 (Existing Facilities) because the actions identified in the program are limited to the permitting, leasing, and minor alteration of existing public facilities, including existing streets, sidewalks, bicycle and pedestrian trails, which would not result in the creation of additional automobile lanes. The program would result in a negligible expansion of existing commercial uses and a negligible expansion of the public’s use of City right- of-way, as the uses included in the temporary program would not vary from the current uses of commercial businesses, residential areas, or public access within the City’s right-of-way. SECTION 6. Notwithstanding any other City policy or procedure, the City Engineer shall be authorized to review and approve on behalf of the City any and all design and construction necessary as part of the temporary program herein and the City Manager shall be authorized to allow and accept on behalf of the City any and all donations of time, materials, labor, professional services and/or funds in support of the temporary program herein without further action of the City Council. SECTION 7. All current and prior emergency and public health orders as currently enacted and in effect, or as subsequently amended or modified, issued by the Governor, the State or County Public Health Official or the City or County Emergency Services Director are expressly adopted and shall be enforceable as if directly enacted by the City Council pursuant to Chapter 2.24 of the San Luis Obispo Municipal Code. ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 32 Resolution No. ______ (2020 Series) Page 8 R ______ SECTION 8. A copy of this Resolution shall be posted on all outside public access doors of City Hall of the City of San Luis Obispo and in one public place within any area of the City within which this Resolution applies and personnel of the City of San Luis Obispo shall endeavor to make copies of this order and regulation available to the news media. Upon motion of _______________________, seconded by _______________________, and on the following roll call vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: The foregoing Resolution was approved this _____ day of _____________________ 2020. ____________________________________ Heidi Harmon, Mayor ATTEST: ____________________________________ Teresa Purrington City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: _____________________________________ J. Christine Dietrick City Attorney IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the official seal of the City of San Luis Obispo, California, on ______________________. ____________________________________ Teresa Purrington, City Clerk ATTACHMENT B Item 1 Packet Page 33 5/20/2020 1 Use of City Right-of-Way to Facilitate Social Distancing and Support Re-Opening Open SLO -A Program to Support Re-opening of Restaurants and Retailers While Providing Community Space for Safe Social Distancing May 2020 Objectives 1.Support the health and safety of all residents, customers and employees 2.Support economic recovery by expanding public space available for outdoor dining capacity, retail curbside pickup and customer queuing to allow for physical distancing during phased reopening 3.Ensure equitable access for all businesses 4.Deploy temporary and “quick-build” street improvements to activate streets and improve community safety and access to active transportation 5.Provide for safe flow of all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists and drivers 6.Implement a well-crafted pilot program with potential for long- term expansion of outdoor dining and activated streets 1 2 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 34 5/20/2020 2 Strategies 1.Temporary Street Closures Downtown 2.Use of Mission Plaza and Parking Lots for Outdoor Dining 3.Parklet Pilot Program 4.Higuera Street Complete Street & Traffic Calming 5.Neighborhood “SLO Streets” 6.Pop-up “Quick-Build” Street Activation Strategies Short-term Street Closures Downtown evenings/weekends closure to car traffic Higuera Street (Osos to Nipomo) Monterey Street (Chorro to Osos) Future consideration for other downtown streets Retain north-south cross street traffic during Marsh Bridge Closure Prioritize nearest cross street curb space for deliveries, quick turnover parking, and ADA parking Future Monterey Street (Downtown Concept Plan) 3 4 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 35 5/20/2020 3 Strategies Activate Mission Plaza & Parking Lots Through City provided “staffed” tables, chairs, and umbrellas, for socially distanced “dining” of takeaway food. Potential for retail booths, local art pop-ups, etc. Mission Plaza and City Lot 10 (near Old SLO BBQ) as City-initiated pilot locations Potential to allow use of selected spaces within private parking lots for outdoor dining use Strategies Parklets Convert selected on-street parking spaces to outdoor dining space or other pedestrian uses City to fund and construct; allow private use/encroachment via existing sidewalk dining permitting process Current County Health restrictions may limit utility for outdoor dining; City to continue to monitor 5 6 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 36 5/20/2020 4 Higuera Street Complete Street & Traffic Calming Restripe Higuera (Santa Rosa to Nipomo) to 2 auto travel lanes Narrower street reduces speeds, reduces pedestrian crossing exposure, provides more space for active uses Stripe temporary buffered bike lane Pilot allows “test” of long-term elements from Downtown Concept Plan before 2021 downtown paving project Strategies Neighborhood SLO Streets Temporary closure of select neighborhood streets to thru traffic using low- cost traffic control Retains access for local residents, deliveries, emergency & service vehicles Creates space for active uses and safe social distancing Start with a selected routes planned for future neighborhood greenways 7 8 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 37 5/20/2020 5 Strategies Pop-Ups & “Quick-Build” Opportunities Leverage other low-cost opportunities to improve public safety and activate street space for community benefit Using sidewalks for merchandise, queueing, art and cultural pop-up exhibits Painted bulbouts, planter boxes & street murals Opportunities for quick-build protected bike lanes using low-cost temporary materials while traffic levels are down Explore grant funding options and opportunities to work with community groups & neighborhood volunteers Key Considerations Public safety access, including retaining clear width for fire response, coordinating closely with law enforcement and emergency response providers Parking capacity and loading zones, including ADA, drop-off/pick-up areas Downtown circulation with Marsh Street Bridge Closure Coordination with Farmer’s Market (when able resume) Regulatory Compliance, including building code, ADA, State and County Health requirements, ABC, encroachment permits 9 10 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 38 5/20/2020 6 Key Considerations (cont.) Equitable Benefit to Local Businesses Public communication and education Physical distancing requirements and guidelines Costs to City (installation, street cleaning, stormwater management, maintenance, operations, staffing, etc.) Alignment with other city goals and plans (Downtown Concept Plan, Multimodal Transportation, Climate Action) Process and Approach Duration Pilot program for one year Potential to retain some elements as permanent installations depending on results and community feedback. Summer 2021 downtown paving project Communication Community outreach and marketing is critical, particularly with local businesses Next Step - survey of downtown businesses and greater community Compliance and Permitting Facilitate program through existing City Ordinances and permitting processes for encroachment and outdoor dining Assist local businesses with working through applicable State, County Health Department and ABC regulations Will be iterative process 11 12 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 39 5/20/2020 7 Process and Approach Implementation Priorities Temporary Street Closures & Use of Mission Plaza & Parking Lots for Outdoor Commerce Higuera Complete Street & Residential “SLO Streets” Parklet Pilot Program Pop-Ups & Quick-Build Projects Costs & Funding Anticipated Costs Temporary Traffic Control & Road Striping: $50,000 Parklets (4 @ $25k per location) = $100,000 Tables, Chairs, Planters, Street Furniture = $20,000 Pop-Up/Quick-Build Elements = $15,000 Contingency = $15,000 TOTAL = $200,000 Funding FY2020-21 Supplemental Budget will include $200K CIP request to support Open SLO program Leverage grants and community volunteer resources where feasible 13 14 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 40 5/20/2020 8 Council Recommendations 1.Receive staff report and presentation 2.Provide feedback, questions, concerns on program elements 3.If supportive of conceptual plans, Approve Resolution and direct staff to proceed with detailed planning and implementation, including any requested plan modifications 4.Consider funding request as part of FY2020-21 Supplemental Budget (On Council Agenda 6/2/2020) Alternatives: Direct staff not to proceed or continue item to a future meeting date. Suggestions? Questions? Concerns? Contact lschwartz@slocity.org or (805) 781-7190 Thank you! 15 16 ATTACHMENT C Item 1 Packet Page 41 Other Cities Re-Prioritizing Public Right-of-Way to Enable Social Distancing during Initial Stages of Reopening Some cities have designated emails or portals for restaurants to request curbside pick-up zones and receive City assistance to put up signage. Other cities, such as Santa Monica, are allowing restaurants to self-convert up to two parking meters in front of their businesses into 10-minute loading zones for pick-up and delivery orders. Santa Monica provides this sheet for restaurant owners to print themselves, just needing to add their business name, operating hours, and meter number. Many cities are closing down quiet residential streets and/or streets surrounding parks and trailheads to cars (still allowing for local resident car access). These streets are then open to pedestrian behavior that is transitory in nature (walking, running, biking, roller blading). Cities made sure not to close areas that would impact food pickup areas, parking around hospitals, and bus routes. In addition to creating pop-up bike lanes, several cities, such as Seattle, were already in the process of permanently replacing parking spots with bike lanes – shown to have health, environmental, and economic benefits. Action Locations Close off streets with temporary barricades to allow for safely distanced walking, running, biking, and rolling Alameda, CA, Austin, TX, Baltimore, MD, Bend, OR, Boston, MA, Brookline, MA, Burlington, VT, Calgary, Canada, Cleveland, OH, Denver, CO, Des Moines, IA, Edmonton, Canada, Emeryville, CA, Hoboken, NJ, Kampala, Uganda, Kansas City, KS, Madison, WI, Minneapolis, MN, Montgomery County, MD, Montreal, Canada, Nashville, TN, New Haven, CT, New York, NY, Oakland, CA, Pasadena, CA, Philadelphia, PA, Portland, OR, Saint Paul, MN, Salt Lake City, UT, San Diego, CA, San Francisco, CA, Seattle, WA, Toronto, Canada, Vancouver, Canada, Washington, DC, Winnipeg, Canada Convert parking spaces near restaurants to designated loading and food pick-ups zones Alexandria, VA, Anchorage, AK, Austin, TX, Boston, MA, Champaign, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Melbourne, FL, Montgomery County, Maryland, San Clemente, CA, Santa Monica, CA, Seattle, WA, Tacoma, WA, Washington, DC, Convert parking spaces into pop-up bike lanes and temporarily widened sidewalks Berlin, Germany (and 133 other German cities), Bogota, Colombia, Mexico City, Mexico, New York, New York, New Zealand, Paris, France, ATTACHMENT D Item 1 Packet Page 42 Example Photos ATTACHMENT D Item 1 Packet Page 43 ATTACHMENT D Item 1 Packet Page 44