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Item 09 - Consideration of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force Recommendations Department Name: Administration Cost Center: 1021 For Agenda of: January 12, 2021 Placement: Business Estimated Time: 60 Minutes FROM: Derek Johnson, City Manager SUBJECT: CONSIDERATION OF THE DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION TASK FORCE (DEI-TF) RECOMMENDATIONS RECOMMENDATION Approve a Resolution accepting the recommendations set forth by Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force (Attachment A). Background In July 2020, the City Council established a DEI Task Force for the purpose of advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in the City by engaging community leaders to: • Focus on activities that support marginalized racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. • Collect information and insight about advancing DEI in San Luis Obispo. • Develop a notice of funding availability to support the DEI work of proven organizations and recommend applicants for funding. • Provide guidance and a foundation for creating a 2021-2023 DEI-focused Major City Goal. • Strengthen the focus and role of the Human Relations Commission (HRC) to support the City’s vision. DEI-TF Selection Process Twelve SLO County residents (including Councilmember Stewart) were appointed to the task force from a pool of 95 applicants and following interviews of 44 candidates by Councilmember Stewart and Mayor Harmon. Dale Magee and Beya Makekau served as consulting staff to the task force and the City Manager attended all interviews. The City Council selected the 12 task force members in August 2020. Meetings The task force met 14 times from September 10, 2020 through January 7, 2021 via zoom. Task force members contributed hundreds of hours during – and in between – these meetings, which were used to examine equity gaps and the experiences of SLO’s most marginalized communities, and to inform recommendations that would be presented to Council. Representatives of underrepresented communities provided “learning sessions” at most meetings. Item 9 Packet Page 160 Additionally, six task force members served on two Grant Review subcommittees that met a total of six times; and two members contributed more than 40 hours on the Recommendation Development subcommittee. The DEI Task Force held its last meeting on January 7, 2021. Summary of Recommendations The DEI Task Force considered more than 90 recommendations that ranged from direct actions the City has plenary authority over to efforts that the City can influence and support through partnerships and collaboration. The recommendations were categorized within the following informal “focus areas”: 1. City Structure and Organization 2. Policies & Practices 3. Minority Business Support & Attraction 4. SLO Police Department & Community 5. Development of Multicultural Center 6. City - Cal Poly - Cuesta Partnerships 7. City as Influencer (i.e., strategize, collaborate, and use position to advance DEI efforts in the County and beyond) The task force identified five essential recommendations; these are seen as necessary for significant lasting positive change: 1. Adopt a Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Major City Goal for the 2021-23 Financial Plan 2. Establish Office for DEI within the City 3. Develop and Implement DEI strategic plan for the City 4. Commit to ongoing, annual funding of at least $150,000 for DEI high-impact grants 5. Charge the Human Relations Commission to designate Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion as a standing priority Additional “high impact” recommendations were endorsed: 1. Support Feasibility Study of a Multicultural Center 2. Increase Access and Inclusion to Civic Learning and Leadership Opportunities for BIPOC and LGBTQ+ Communities via City-Sponsored Programs 3. Amplify Community-Based Policing and Restorative Practices SLOPD 4. Sponsor community Education Regarding DEI 5. Actively Support and Attract Minority-Owned Businesses 6. Increase Cultural Representation through the Arts 7. Increase support of the Undocumented Community 8. Utilize the Human Relations Commission to steward implementation of recommendations and be standing DEI body HRC Next Steps The HRC held two strategic planning sessions concurrent to the DEI Task Force’s time in service, in anticipation of increasing its role and impact in advancing DEI efforts within the City. The HRC and its current members have affirmed that it is the appropriate body to track and advocate for implementation of the task force’s recommendations and continued DEI work in general. Two HRC members served on the DEI Task Force. Item 9 Packet Page 161 Previous Council or Advisory Body Action The Mayor’s quarterly advisory body meeting of chairpersons were briefed during the process. The HRC was also briefed throughout the process and as mentioned in this report, work began to explore the role, scope, and focus of the HRC to help advance DEI efforts. Policy Context The DEI-TF recommendations provide both tactical and strategic insight and steps to help the City advance the Council’s adopted Vision Statement: The City of San Luis Obispo is a dynamic community embracing its future while respecting its past with core values of civility, sustainability, diversity, inclusivity, regionalism, partnership, and resiliency. Public Engagement All meetings of the DEI Task Force were noticed per the Brown Act. Public comment was received via email, voice mail and live for almost every meeting. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW Section 15262 of the California Environmental Quality Act provides a Categorial Exemption for any feasibility or planning studies for possible future actions which the agency, board, or commission has not approved, adopted, or funded and does not require the preparation of an EIR or negative declaration but does require consideration of environmental factors. FISCAL IMPACT Budgeted: Yes/No Budget Year: 2020-21 Funding Identified: Yes/No Fiscal Analysis: Funding Sources Total Budget Available Current Funding Request Remaining Balance Annual Ongoing Cost General Fund $270,000 $0 $90,000 Unknown State Federal Fees Other: Total $270,000 $0 90,000 Unknown No funding requests are being made at this time and the Council will evaluate which recommendations from the DEI-TF will be considered for funding allocation as part of the 2021- 23 Financial Planning process. Item 9 Packet Page 162 ALTERNATIVES The Council could decide not to accept and file the recommendations. This is not recommended as the DEI-TF report includes actions and steps to help advance the City’s vision statement of diversity and inclusion. Attachments: a - Draft Resolution b - DEI-TF Recommendation Report dated 12/17/2020 Item 9 Packet Page 163 R ______ RESOLUTION NO. _____ (2021 SERIES) A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA, RECOGNIZING AND RECEIVING THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION TASK FORCE WHEREAS, the City Council has expressed a commitment to making San Luis Obispo a welcoming, inclusive, and safe community for everyone, and to promoting free thought and speech, while condemning racism, hate speech, bigotry, violence, and prejudice; and WHEREAS, as a part of the adoption of the City’s 2019- 2021 Major City Goals, the City Council also set a vision of a dynamic community embracing its future while respecting its past with core values of civility, sustainability, diversity, inclusivity, regionalism, partnership, and resiliency as a guide to approaching the work of the Major City Goals; and WHEREAS, during the July 7, 2020 City Council Meeting, in recognizing the need to continue and formalize these efforts, the City Council created the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force (DEI-TF) as part of a wider effort to help make the City an inclusive and safe community for everyone; and WHEREAS, on September 1, 2020 after an application period that received 95 applicants, the City Council appointed twelve San Luis Obispo County residents who displayed commitment to advancing systemic changes as members to the DEI-TF; and WHEREAS, since the task force’s appointment in September, it has met a total of 14 times focusing on their core objectives of completing the outcomes of its charter, including: supporting marginalized communities with direct funding for proven or promising impactful, sustainable projects; completing a framework and potential scope for a 21-23 DEI-focused Major City Goal; and providing a recommendation to the City Council on the role and function of the HRC in relation to DEI efforts; and WHEREAS, additionally, in July of 2020 the City created its first ever internal Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee (DEI Committee) comprised of 17 staff members to conduct an Internal Diversity Equity and Inclusion Audit that includes 55 questions in 5 topic areas to identify policies, programs, and practices that support DEI efforts as well as areas for improvement; and WHEREAS, the DEI Committee has been working with Dr. Joy Pederson of Clarity Collective to prioritize a list of over 30 action-items identified during the audit that are aimed at advancing DEI efforts throughout the organization; and WHEREAS, the DEI-TF has worked towards advancing DEI throughout the community, and the DEI Committee has worked towards the same within the organization; the DEI-TF and the DEI Committee have worked independently of each other for the first half of Fiscal Year 2021 and both efforts will help advance DEI efforts the City organization the Community; and Item 9 Packet Page 164 Resolution No. _____ (2021 Series) Page 2 R ______ WHEREAS, Section 15262 of the California Environmental Quality Act provides a Categorial Exemption for any feasibility or planning studies for possible future actions which the agency, board, or commission has not approved, adopted, or funded and does not require the preparation of an EIR or negative declaration but does require consideration of environmental factors. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Council of the City of San Luis Obispo to take the following actions: 1. The recommendations set forth by Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force as shown in Exhibit A are hereby accepted and shall be filed as reviewed by the City Council on January 12, 2021 and will be considered as part of making future decisions and budget allocations for each two-year Financial Plan. Item 9 Packet Page 165 Resolution No. _____ (2021 Series) Page 3 R ______ 2. The Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force recommendations are exempt pursuant to Section 15262 of the California Environmental Quality Act because they are made for possible future actions which the City Council has not approved, adopted, or funded. Upon motion of _______________________, seconded by _______________________, and on the following roll call vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: The foregoing resolution was adopted this _____ day of _____________________ 2021. ____________________________________ Mayor Heidi Harmon ATTEST: ____________________________________ Teresa Purrington City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: _____________________________________ J. Christine Dietrick City Attorney IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the official seal of the City of San Luis Obispo, California, on ____________________________. ____________________________________ Teresa Purrington City Clerk Item 9 Packet Page 166 ADOPTED BY TASK FORCE 12.17.20 RECOMMENDATIONS TO CITY COUNCIL FOR ADVANCING DIVERSITY, EQUITY & INCLUSION IN THE CITY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO Presented by the Diversity, Equity& Inclusion Task Force January 12, 2021 RECOMMENDATIONS TO CITY COUNCIL FOR ADVANCING DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION IN THE CITY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 167 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 1 RECOMMENDATIONS TO CITY COUNCIL FOR ADVANCING DIVERSITY, EQUITY & INCLUSION IN THE CITY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO This report summarizes the work and presents recommendations from the City’s DEI Task Force following three-months of assessment, review, and consideration. TASK FORCE MEMBERS Chair Amman Asfaw –Graduate Student, Cal Poly; Black Student Life leader Vice Chair Michael Boyer – Founder, Diversity Coalition of SLO County, Board President, Stand Strong; CEO, Boys & Girls Club of Mid Central Coast Renoda Campbell – Chair, SLO City Human Relations Commission Dusty Colyer-Worth – SLO Chamber of Commerce; Gala Pride and Diversity Center Noha Kolkailah – Founder/President, Peace Academy; Teacher, SLO High School Maxine Kozler –Advisory Council, Cal Poly Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship; Advisory Council, Cal Poly Career Services Matthew Melendrez – Executive Team, Lenses DE&I Institute Jenell Navarro – Chair, Ethnic Studies, Cal Poly Vanessa Parsons – Teacher and Equity Team, San Luis Coastal Unified School District Katherine Soule – Director, University of California Cooperative Extension; Board of Directors, Gala Pride and Diversity Center Erica A. Stewart – City Councilmember Oscar Velasco Vargas – Central Coast Coalition for Undocumented Student Success Support Team Beya Makekau – Task Force facilitator; Director, Cal Poly Office of University Diversity & Inclusion Dale Magee – Task Force project manager; Catalyst Consulting Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 168 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 2 VISION & GOALS FOR THE CITY The Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Task Force envisions a San Luis Obispo that is a welcoming and inclusive place that values diversity, promotes equity and belonging, and actively denounces systemic racism and discrimination. The City strives to create policies, systems, environments, and leadership to support diverse lifestyles, cultural richness, and equity in health, education, and financial security. Desired Outcomes for the City The recommendations that follow are focused on systemic change across all City functions, departments, and policies to create a culture of representation, equity, and inclusivity. They are part of the City’s ongoing commitment to achieve lasting change, and work to: c Undo systemic racism, bias, and discrimination c Strengthen a sense of belonging for Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQ+1, and other marginalized racial, ethnic, and faith-based communities c Increase the City’s cultural competence c Reduce barriers to residing and thriving in the City c Display proactive inclusion of historically underrepresented communities in all aspects of City planning, funding, goal setting, and policy- and decision-making. The efforts outlined in this document are tangible pathways for materializing a City of progress and empowerment. Furthermore, the DEI Task Force recommendations are directly aligned with the eighth guiding principle outlined in the City’s June 2020 Meta Goal : “The city recognizes that social, and economic inequality is embedded in our systems and culture, and that recovery must integrate deep structural transition to support the well-being and empowerment of marginalized communities.” By adopting the recommendations that follow, the Council will demonstrate that San Luis Obispo is a city committed to policies, practices and structures that increase equity, racial justice, and inclusion. 1 LGBTQ+ is an acronym that represents marginalized gender identities, sexual orientation, and gender expression. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 169 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 3 BACKGROUND Purpose of the DEI Task Force In July 2020, the Council approved the creation of a limited-term DEI Task Force as part of a wider effort to help make San Luis Obispo an inclusive community for everyone and to advise the City in developing recommendations that advance diversity, equity, and inclusion. The task force was comprised of 11 volunteer community members, and Councilmember Erica A. Stewart. City Manager Derek Johnson and consultants Dale Magee and Beya Makekau provided staffing and facilitation support. Charter The task force was chartered to help advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in the city by engaging community leaders and change agents to: 1) Focus on activities that support marginalized racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. 2) Collect information and insight about advancing DEI in San Luis Obispo. 3) Develop a notice of funding availability to support the DEI work of proven organizations and best practices for change. 4) Provide guidance and a foundation for creating a 2021-2023 DEI-focused Major City Goal. 5) Strengthen the focus and role of the Human Relations Commission (HRC) to support the City’s vision. Outcomes 1) Support the work of DEI providers with directed funding for proven or promising impactful, sustainable projects. The task force administered a grant process between September – November 2020. On November 17, 2020, Council approved its recommendations for eight community organizations to receive almost $110,000 in grant funding for projects to advance DEI. 2) Develop a proposed framework and potential scope for a FY21-23 DEI-focused Major City Goal. 3) Provide a recommendation on the role and function of the HRC in relation to DEI efforts This report forwards recommendations for Outcomes #2 and #3. The DEI Task Force completed its work on January 7, 2021 and provided its recommendations to the City Council on January 12, 2021. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 170 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 4 DEVELOPMENT OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS Demographics & Focus The recommendations in this document are focused on addressing inequities in policies, systems, and environments to improve community social conditions and meet the needs of some of our most marginalized populations. The table below provides city demographics as of July 2019. When compared to state demographics where 36.5% of the population of California identified as white (not Hispanic or Latino), it is clear that systemic and social conditions exist that impact diversity within the City’s population. Source: U.S. Census Bureau City of San Luis Obispo State of California Estimates, July 2019 47,459 39,512,223 Race and Ethnicity White (not Hispanic or Latino) 70.7% 36.5% Black or African American 2.2% 6.5% American Indian and Alaska Native 0.5% 1.6% Asian 5.4% 15.5% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0.0% 0.5% Two or More Races 3.9% 4.0% Latinx 18.3% 39.4% Families and Living Arrangements Language other than English spoken at home (2019) 17.5% 44.2% Education High school graduate or higher, age 25 years+, 2015-2019 92.9% 83.3% Bachelor’s degree or higher, age 25 years+, 2015-2019 50.0% 33.9% Health With a disability, under age 65 years, 2015-2019 5.5% 6.7% Persons without health insurance, under age 65 years 5.1% 8.9% Business Minority-owned firms, 2012 13.5% 45.6% Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 171 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 5 The DEI Task Force focused predominately on the salient needs and experiences of the BIPOC and LGBTQ+ communities. The reality that these groups are some of the smallest in number and most underrepresented within San Luis Obispo drove many of the efforts and strategies found in this document. However, the recommendations are focused on addressing inequities in policies, systems, and environments intended to improve the lived experiences of marginalized communities in San Luis Obispo. Additionally, the task force calls for the City’s ongoing commitment towards engaging and educating the dominant white community to increase awareness and understanding of DEI in San Luis Obispo, and grow broader support for the City’s efforts. This, coupled with prioritizing an equity framework, is the path towards reaching a San Luis Obispo that is safe, inclusive, and just. Approach To achieve the task force’s objectives, of foremost importance was the selection of those who would serve as members. After a robust application and interview process, a panel of diverse San Luis Obispo County residents was appointed. Each member exhibited a holistic approach to equity informed by their expertise and lived experiences. Additionally, consulting staff was retained for their experience in DEI, community change, strategic planning, and program design supported the task force. Research and best practices were woven into overall processes and recommendations. The task force met almost weekly from September 10, 2020 through January 7, 2021. Hundreds of hours were contributed by members; additional hours were contributed by other community members in order to enrich the discussion and the recommendations presented in this report. Most task force meetings were used to elevate the voices of underrepresented communities through “learning sessions.” These were designed to identify the greatest equity gaps in SLO and strategies for addressing those gaps. Learning Session topics focused on local law enforcement/community relations, and the experiences of local Asian Pacific Islander Desi American, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, LGBTQ+, and undocumented communities. They specifically considered: c The most pressing equity gaps and needs of their community. The lived realities for their community in SLO. c Where progress has been made that is encouraging for their community. c What these communities most wanted the DEI Task Force and the City to understand. c What the City can do better for their community and why. Ultimately, the DEI Task Force participated in 14 full membership meetings, six grant-making subcommittee meetings, six learning sessions with representatives of marginalized racial, ethnic, and cultural groups, a meeting with SLOPD leadership, and reviewed needs from 20 community DEI providers (via the DEI grant process) in order to inform and develop the following recommendations. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 172 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 6 RECOMMENDATIONS With this background in mind, the DEI Task Force curated and considered over ninety recommendations within identified focused areas. They ranged from direct actions the City can control, to efforts that the City can influence and support through partnerships. The focus areas included: 1. City Structure and Organization 2. Policies & Practices 3. Minority Business Support & Attraction 4. SLO Police Department & Community 5. Development of Multicultural Center 6. City - Cal Poly - Cuesta Partnerships 7. City as Influencer2 Among the numerous actions and ideas considered, the DEI Task Force recommends the following as first- step priorities for a comprehensive framework through which the City can systemically and structurally support the advancement of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Recommendations – Essential Recommendation #1 Adopt a Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Major City Goal for FY21-23 Designation of DEI as a Major City Goal will allocate resources, specific work plans, and identified outcomes that will move the community towards the desired broader, lasting change rooted in diversity, equity, and inclusion. Recommendation #2 Establish Office for DEI within the City An office dedicated to DEI is the City’s forward-facing commitment to structural and lasting change. It would create and sustain relationships with marginalized communities and their leaders. This office would support the City’s comprehensive approach to improving DEI, and would work with all departments to improve policies, processes, standard operating procedures, and cultivate a shared responsibility for diversity, equity, and inclusion. Key Elements: c Create a full-time DEI manager position and ensure office is adequately resourced for success c Serve as City liaison and conduit to community, Cal Poly, Cuesta, and other stakeholders c Create formal and informal structures to build community and provide ongoing voice, representation, and guidance to the City c Retain a contracted yak titʸu titʸu yak tiłhini Tribal liaison c Develop and implement a DEI strategic plan; implement applicable DEI Task Force recommendations c Coordinate and advocate for DEI education programs for the public, utilizing proven providers c Support the HRC 2The City will strategize, collaborate, and use its position in the County, region, and beyond to advance DEI efforts. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 173 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 7 c Maintain robust DEI presence on City’s website c Manage annual DEI grant-making process Recommendation #3 Develop and Implement DEI Strategic Plan for the City Create a strategic plan for a comprehensive DEI Initiative. Include assessment of City policies, practices, environments, and community needs. Ensure that the community is deeply engaged; utilization of the HRC and emeriti DEI Task Force members as part of a steering committee is recommended. A community- partnered approach to strategic planning is essential to removing barriers and making substantial improvements to DEI within the city. Key Elements: c Dedicate specialized resources (staffing, etc.) to conduct thorough assessment and develop effective strategies and workplans with measurable and reportable outcomes c Utilize DEI Task Force’s compilation of recommendations, identified key areas, and suggested approaches as a starting point c Engage the community; create a City/Community strategic planning steering committee Recommendation #4 Commit to ongoing, annual funding of at least $150,000 for DEI High-Impact Grants Continue the 20-21 grant allocation permanently as an annual program dedicated to funding nonprofit organizations that have a track record of operating high impact and relevant programs focused on improving the lives of members of marginalized communities in SLO. Key Elements c Separate funding that augments and compliments Grants in Aid (GIA) funding c Administer through the HRC, manage through the Office for DEI Recommendation #5 Charge the Human Relations Commission to Designate Diversity, Equity and Inclusion as a Standing Priority Key elements c Grant the HRC authority and standing to influence the City’s DEI efforts in the community c Sustain the work of the DEI Task Force c Administer the DEI Grants - as it does the GIA grants c Advise on DEI strategic plan development, implementation, and accountability Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 174 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 8 Recommendations –Additional High Impact Opportunities The following are in no rank order or preference; Council’s equitable attention is encouraged.  Support Feasibility Study of a Multicultural Center Designate a City representative to engage with community and business leaders who are planning the creation of a multicultural center in SLO. Assist in researching the needs, demand, operating models, and overall feasibility. Provide funding to support planning activities. The multicultural center is envisioned as a public/private partnership. It will be a safe place for marginalized populations and cultural organizations to gather and create community, as well as provide community outreach and education. Functions of the center may include cultural exhibits and celebrations, seminars, public meetings, community forums, food programs, and workspace. Key Elements c Designate staff to support the feasibility and planning phases of this endeavor c Provide funding for planning support c Plan for on-going City funding to support operations if a center is opened  Increase Access and Inclusion to Civic Learning and Leadership Opportunities for BIPOC and LGBTQ+ Communities via City-Sponsored Programs Revise and expand existing City-sponsored programs (such as “City 101” and the former Citizen’s Academy –rebranded as “Civic Leadership Academy”), and support development of leadership and internship opportunities - especially for youth - to increase understanding, access, and participation in local government by BIPOC and LGBTQ+ residents. This seeks to increase and diversify the community members who understand, navigate, and actively participate in the governmental systems essential to creating meaningful improvements in the City. Key Elements c Provide information on how the City operates, how to navigate government systems, and create change c Provide training on participating on appointed boards, committees, and commissions, and how to run for elected office c Facilitate participation from a broader, more diverse population on City advisory boards, commissions, and committees by providing stipends, childcare, transportation, etc. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 175 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 9  Amplify Community-Based Policing and Restorative Practices SLOPD In an effort to align with national trends and best practices the City should identify processes for redirecting funds to increase the ability for social service providers to support in situations where police are currently serving as both responders and providers. Identify and prioritize strategies for alternative methods to policing in the City and commit to intentionally centering the needs of BIPOC community. Promote funding and partnerships to actively engage in restorative justice practices to reduce acts of violence in our community, while reducing recidivism and increasing accountability and healing. Key Elements: c Implement practices from innovative policing models, such as Cahoots (Eugene, OR) c Re-envision and re-design the Police and Community Together (PACT), including stipends for the community partners c Explore ways the City can help expand programs that serve people with mental illness or experiencing homelessness - such as those provided by Transitions-Mental Health Association and CAPSLO - to reduce calls routed to police officers c Increase hiring of Community Service Officers to reduce calls directed towards armed officers c Carefully review new Police Station building program and budget for opportunities to reduce costs to preserve resources for community service investments c Support cannabis code compliance and enforcement through contracted non-sworn enforcement personnel instead of sworn police officers c Actively influence San Luis Obispo County agencies to adequately fund organizations such as Restorative Partners and programs to increase education, training, accountability, and reentry of formerly incarcerated people c Promote programs that acknowledge and address the needs of the victims and survivors Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 176 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 10  Sponsor Community Education Regarding DEI Partner with DEI providers - such as the Diversity Coalition San Luis Obispo County, R.A.C.E. Matters SLO, Cal Poly, Cuesta, Gala Pride and Diversity Center - to expand ongoing community education programs and forums, targeting the dominate populations in the City (i.e. white, heterosexual, cisgender, documented, housed, able-bodied, Christian). Suggested topics: how to be anti-racist, increasing intercultural competence, and understanding unconscious bias. Additionally, the City is requested to leverage existing relationships with SLCUSD to support the development and implementation of current, relevant, culturally competent curriculum and educational programs to youth and educators. Key Elements: c Sponsor and co-host DEI-related trainings and workshops for the entire community c Provide the use of City facilities at a donated or reduce fee to community organizations providing educational programs that support this recommendation c Leverage partnerships with Cal Poly and Cuesta to provide its internal DEI educational programs to the community-at-large c Encourage and support SLCUSD in increasing and improving culturally competent curriculum (e.g. assist in securing grant funding for expert community members, such as the Tribal leaders, to work with curriculum developers)  Actively Support and Attract Minority-Owned Businesses Create programs with local economic development organizations (e.g. SLO Chamber, REACH, CIE/SBDC) that attract and elevate BIPOC, LGBTQ+ and other minority-owned/operated businesses. Promote efforts to attract businesses that support diverse communities and build a welcoming climate (e.g. grocery stores, barbershops). Develop a recognition program for city businesses that actively support and advance DEI. This may be demonstrated by hiring practices, Diversity Values statement, staff training, utilizing minority-owned suppliers, or other contributions to create a welcoming and inclusive business community. Key Elements: c Establish a process for the City to recognize and promote Minority-owned businesses c Implement protocols within the City’s Office of Economic Development to reach out to all existing and new Minority-owned/operated businesses to learn of their experiences operating in SLO, and to identify ways the City can be of support c Establish a City Leadership/Chamber of Commerce / Minority Business Owners’ roundtable c Explore and utilize innovative practices such as micro-loans, targeted-sector recruiting, City- facilitated lending, grants, and crowdfunding Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 177 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 11  Increase Cultural Representation through the Arts Prioritize and fund public art projects that center the history and experiences of the historically marginalized populations. These art projects can improve DEI within SLO by acknowledging the heritage and contemporary experiences of the yak titʸu titʸu yak tiłhini people (Northern Chumash), as well as other marginalized groups. The City should also collaborate with the County and Chamber to utilize their venues for DEI-related educational and creative displays. Artists - including youth artists - who are members of these marginalized populations, should be commissioned. Key Elements: c Commission minority artists to feature art that provides a fuller representation of all communities c Work with Chamber of Commerce to spotlight yak titʸu titʸu yak tiłhini people and other underrepresented communities at the Visitor Center c Seek to engage the yak titʸu titʸu yak tiłhini people to create a cultural art display at San Luis Obispo County Airport  Increase support of the Undocumented Community Increase understanding of the needs and ways to support this vulnerable population. Partner with key organizations, such as Central Coast Coalition for Undocumented Student Success and Promotores, to advance strategies for undocumented individuals’ health, well-being, and success. Key Elements: c Establish a visual way to convey support of the Undocumented community within the City’s departments and throughout its operations. They may include “Undocu-Friendly” logo on City documents, as applicable c Support development of an “Undocu” resource guide c Work with the Community Foundation to increase private funding for scholarships, paid internships, venture capital, etc. (as not eligible for public funding) Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 178 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 12 OUR HOPE FOR OUR CITY The establishment of the DEI Task Force was one step in continuing to address systemic and pervasive discrimination within the City of San Luis Obispo. The task force’s commitment to its charge exemplifies the level of civic passion that exists for cultivating a City organization that is steadfast in improving its policies, practices, and structures that increase diversity and inclusion, reduce bias, and protect the well-being, safety, and empowerment of all its residents. Through adoption of the DEI Task Force’s recommendations, the City Council can implement the expertise -and experiences of - twelve community leaders who represent a wide range of the marginalized populations within San Luis Obispo. If these recommendations are embraced - and systemically and strategically funded in the City’s Financial Plan - the City will send a message that there is an ongoing commitment to improving DEI, as well as let marginalized community members know that they were heard and valued. Going forward - to be successful - the City will have to commit ongoing funding, dedicated staff, priorities, and a willingness to continue to engage in difficult conversations and processes. These recommendations represent a seed of hope. We urge the Council to plant this hope. Ultimately it will require the active participation by City leadership and members of community as a whole to grow this hope into a flourishing San Luis Obispo. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 179 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 13 APPENDICES APPENDIX A: DEI HIGH -IMPACT FUNDING RECIPIENTS 2020-21 DEI High Impact Grant Recipients Total Budget = $120,000 Total Awarded = $109,800 Organization Program Requested Amount Approved Amount Central Coast Coalition for Undocumented Student Success Community Summit – to be held in SLO $6,000 $10,200 Diversity Coalition San Luis Obispo County Multicultural Center, planning, early operations + Diversity Education & Training in SLO schools $100,000 $10,000 Literacy for Life General operating funds $10,000 $10,000 One Cool Earth Garden/Health curriculum translated into Spanish -SLCUSD elementary + Family Meal Program for English Learners $3,200 $3,200 R.A.C.E. Matters "Belonging 2021" - multimedia arts experience centered on Black community, inclusion/action for all $27,600 $32,600 SLO International Film Festival The Change Makers. Film Festival spotlighting BIPOC filmmakers $7,500 $7,500 SLO Noor Foundation Free Health & Support Services for Uninsured BIPOC Residents $13,100 $20,000 SLO Repertory Theater Yr.-long series of productions, Educational programming, centered on increasing access, diversity, equity, justice $10,000 $16,300 Total of Task Force's Recommendations: Approved by City Council on Nov 17, 2020. $109,800 Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 180 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 14 APPENDIX B: INFORMAL RECOMMENDATIONS & IDEAS – SOURCE COMPILATION The following is a compilation of informal recommendations, ideas and suggestions generated during the DEI Task Force’s time in service. They came from a variety of sources: Learning Session presenters, task force members’ experiences, community suggestions, staff input, city models, best practices, etc. Staff compiled and organized this “laundry list” of recommendations et al for utility only – none are ranked or evaluated in the following; they are just listed. This compilation was used to assist the task force as it started to develop its final recommendations for advancing DEI within San Luis Obispo. The recommendations and ideas (in either column) were not voted on by the task force, nor do the lists imply unanimous agreement or consensus. They do, however, reflect the breadth and diversity of actions the task force considered. FOCUS AREA: City Structure and Organization Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas – suggestions - possibilities Establish Office for DEI within the City • Create position to oversee DEI efforts, not charged with doing it all - DEI Manager/Director/CDO / Diversity Liaison - ensure DEI is prioritized, embedded, ongoing • Staff it adequately to achieve goals • Oversee implementation of TF recommendations / DEI Strategic Plan • Report to City Manager • Develops, coordinates, tracks, facilitates work plans • Assists efforts of all Depts related to DEI • Acts as staff liaison to Poly, community – all areas of the community (conduit to community, point person) • Coordinate and align with current internal DEI education efforts • Staff to support the HRC • City's rep on Multicultural Center Viability / Design Group (need more than one rep from community) • Retains Subject Matter Expert • Consider all stakeholders in the community including resistors and their educational needs • Staffing with expertise in public processes, prioritization, grants, know and maneuver in bureaucracy - draw on DEI SMEs experience with racial equity, diversity, and inclusion. • Could provide input into the hiring process for SLO City, help ensure that the City workforce is able to effectively support DEI efforts • Establish an ongoing DEI advisory body (hopefully paid; could this be the HRC?) that will define DEI, identify existing vulnerable populations in the City, and develop a vision statement (advisory body facilitate, complete) DEI Strategic Plan Develop, implement, update annually with work plans Assess existing City policies, procedures, practices, systems, and environments to increase DEI for all vulnerable populations (advisory body facilitate, complete) Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 181 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 15 BIPOC / LGBTQ+ / roundtable/Advisory + Religious Groups Community Rep from each community - meet month/quarterly w City Mngr + Mayor Community representatives vetted by HRC community engagement Paid positions/ stipends Adopt policy to require underrepresented communities, including youth, to have seat on City-controlled commissions, boards, advisories, committees, etc. Paid Indigenous Liaison CA has this at the state level Grant writer Position Part time? Shared with nonprofits? Fund DEI programs - city + community. Leadership position in City for LGBTQ+ issues DEI Office could include multiple positions or identify roles for key community leaders. FOCUS AREA: City Policies & Practices Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions City DEI values statement/commitment Create strong, clear goals, vision, and mission around DEI Clear, uncompromising message from Council that attitudes of racism, discrimination, are not acceptable Fund DEI Community Grants annually Support BIPOC community's efforts thru funding and other supports At least $150,000 annually Assess existing policies and practices Recommend the TF continue; complete this assessment as a first step Adopt policy to require underrepresented communities have seat on City-controlled commissions, boards, advisories, committees Such as CA AB979. Underrep communities = ppl identify as Black, Latino, Native American, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Native Hawaiian, or Alaska Natives, gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender Remove any discriminatory CC&Rs within City's purview Waive fees for property owner to do so Free or reduced public transportation options For people in the hospitality or service industry City Website – improve, enhance Create an anonymous comment box. Place to receive comments on bias, inequities, DEI suggestions, concerns, etc. Links to training, articles, FAQs, education Highlight DEI businesses, DEI Directory, more Pride Index - LGBTQ+ Inclusion City should take this; identify its rating on LGBTQ+ inclusion "Equity Lens" "Cultural Competency Lens" Run all forms, web pages, documents by "cultural competency" reader (e.g. County MH has committee that does this.) Can be quick, embed the practice. Catch things. Internal staff could be trained. City Advisory Boards / Commissions - Facilitate participation for under rep. ppl Provide stipends, childcare, non-traditional meeting hours, transportation Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 182 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 16 Hiring, Recruitment & Outreach All applications, ads in Spanish, ads on Spanish radio stations. Include Diversity questions in hiring, interviews Bilingual forms - Increased usage Every City form should state that Spanish translation is available via pho ne (call for translator) or via Google translation - highlight the link Marketing - City sponsored Should include diverse representation (Currently predominantly white and not bilingual) Align with internal DEI strategies & Efforts Effective working practice, commitment Student Translators - create at least one paid summer internship and/or position for students attending SLO schools Students translate City materials to Spanish and Mixtec Prioritize low-income students Create a task force focused on how Universal Basic Income could be implemented Discussed during Black community learning session (Stockton is a model) Create a task force focused on how American Slavery Reparations could be implemented FOCUS AREA: City-led Economic Development / Minority Business Support & Attraction Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions Innovative funding Loans, grants, what can the City do, have access to? Utilize City funds, offer attractive terms, go after businesses, help them come to SLO. (e.g. Paso's loan for Sandbox- a model for attracting businesses as part of its econ dev plan, entrepreneurial plan) First focus on existing businesses of color, make them successful, give them support, City-support, have them as ambassadors to bring in other businesses owners of color Implement with inclusive housing policies. If there are no POC living here, POC businesses will struggle Promote Local BIPOC + Queer Entrepreneurship What are these tactics, best practices? Through Cal Poly CIE? Through Cuesta entrepreneurship center? Attract businesses that attract diverse communities - grocery stores, barbershops Identify tactics, best practices City provides economic incentives – loans, grants, private funding, other Host BIPOC+Queer Entrepreneurs Panel Current and past BIPOC/Queer SLO business owners speak about their journey and experience of building a startup that is minority -owned to attract other BIPOC City residents about potential start up ideas. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 183 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 17 Diversity Pop-Up BIPOC business from across county and neighboring counties increase representation and diversity in SLO via access to food, art, clothes, music etc. Businesses could rotate. Reoccurring business could be aided in finding permanent leases by City. Create Entrepreneurship for Dreamers Follow Undocu Hustle's curriculum that helps undocumented and dreamers build their own business Invite Cuesta college entrepreneurship summit who are helping dreamers and undocumented students build their own business in the time of COVID. City recognizes local businesses that exhibit DEI excellence City highlights BIPOC, LGBTQ, Minority owned or managed businesses DEI -advocate businesses -Businesses that have invested time, energy, resources to DEI commitment; have DEI value statement; Use diverse vendors, Reward businesses, promote on website, other ways SLO City DEI logo sticker in front of business Businesses could be required to post a DEI statement or similar, a measurable rubric - to receive recognition City provides (optional) cultural training for businesses Receive a certification of some sort, in addition to noting a business’s best practices, hiring philosophy, etc. CIE / SBDC opportunities- partner with Cal Poly Entrepreneurial opportunities - BIPOC residents, Undocumented students Commitment to get BIPOC communities in front of investors venture capital pitch contests with DEI Focus (increased access for Spanish speakers) – - bilingual (Spanish/English) around this opportunity. Radio ads in Spanish preferred Work with the SBDC which is already setup to do this for all the Central Coast communities Research and recommend what BIPOC + Queer Entrepreneurs are influential and recommend a list to venture capitalist investors that are looking to invest in BIPOC business. Stronger partnerships with EVC, Reach FOCUS AREA: City-Sponsored Activities - Promoting Awareness & Inclusion Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions Town Halls & Community Listening Session City hosts and goes out to communities Topics such as: current events, current climate, lived experiences, community needs Trainings - City hosts Education for dominant community. Inclusivity Toolkit (implicit bias, privilege, cultural competence, anti-racism) Web site DEI info, FAQ, references, build community understanding, Northern Chumash History, APIDA history, Community Contacts Survey - community at large Gather data re community’s understanding, concerns and suggestions regarding DEI issues and advancement Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 184 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 18 Citizen Leadership Academy/ City 101 – for anyone – “Civic Leadership Academy” -How to be involved - how to get on boards, councils, advisories, committees, task forces - needs to be relevant, attainable to these communities. In Spanish, too. (In progress) -Training for immigrants and undocumented folks to run for elected positions, enter professions Latinx Leadership Program for Youth Discussed during the Latinx session Support of the Undocumented Community Create "Undocu-friendly" logo - Use on City documents, where applicable Create Undocu Resource Guide Public signifiers of "Undocu-friendly” city/businesses/opportunities Offer ESL classes through the SLO Public Library to help Undocu members and newly arr ived immigrants to increase access to English learning skills Offer job training course for immigrants and Undocu members City Spaces -use. Actively promote DEI activities, sponsor Mission Plaza Ludwick Center / City Hall In the Mission: Host cultural events, resource fairs Displays honoring Indigenous communities (Ludwick, City Hall) City Hosts Art Show. The winner of the art show can make recommendations to the City Council about what and how the next mural would get created. Focus on BIPOC representation in the city of SLO. Public art /murals with Parks & Rec Minority community representation and history Possible Locations: Airport, library, Farmers’ Markets FOCUS AREA: Law Enforcement / SLOPD & Community Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions Police Training & Mindset -De-escalation/restorative practices should be priority -Required cultural competency training for police -Shift burden from communities understanding Police/centering on the Police, to the Police understanding BIPOC/ centering on BIPOC communities. Strengthen partnership with Restorative Partners program Fund a restorative position Clear relationships with mental health organizations and cultural centers Stronger PD community liaison position / relationship to BIPOC comms Revise PACT Increase community awareness of PACT, what it does, why it exists. SLOPD - Poly PD - Student Coalition TF members be included in hiring of new chief Chief + BIPOC Advisory Group Work with the Sherriff’s departments’ Unity Council. Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 185 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 19 Clearly defined code of conduct for officers that is accessible and comprehensible to the community at large. Could be as simple as a “10 point” list of promises officers make to our community – especially regarding interactions with marginalized communities. New SLOPD Chief - Training in social work / therapy; socio-emotional learning Enact a City Resolution which commits to rejecting any proposed budgetary increases or personnel expansions to SLOPD Measure G funding should go to all city departments EXCEPT the Police department. This will help balance out and equitize the way SLO City allocates money. Do not follow through with the funding for a new SLOPD station Disarm routine patrol officers, starting with the downtown bike patrol End sweeps of houseless encampments done by police officers This would have to be paired with committing to affordable and creative housing policies - these should be done by Social Services, Mental Health, etc. Enact policy for zero tolerance for officer misconduct Fire officers with substantiated misconduct complaints against them (excessive force, sexual assault, etc.) and do not fill the position End the policy of providing paid leave for officers under investigation Downtown/Homeless Outreach Officers - this program should be operated by 40 Prado, TMHA or other social service/trained homeless provider agency, not police Contract with local social service/homeless/mental health organization to provide this program. Current cost is $892,000 for the 6 officers FOCUS AREA: Multicultural Center / Safe Space/ A Hub / Cultural Center Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions Phase I Planning / Viability Study / Design Convene planning team / study team - community led, City participates, CP + Cuesta input Who’s the lead? Determine level of support, sustainability, vision Vet operating model(s) Write business plan Public/Private partnership. Include Poly? Create as non-profit? City commits resources to planning period, ongoing MOUs / SLAs What's needed / What's wanted? Secure location Secure ongoing funding Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 186 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 20 Phase II On-going Operations BIPOC - centered Community Driven Near a bus line What are the offerings/programming? Free for DEI nonprofits to host workshops Workshops Workshops for Immigrants, skill development series/program as mentioned during the APIDA listening session Participative leisure activities Cultural Events / Showcases Trainings Commercial Kitchen - essential to the operation of an effective Multicultural Center – food connects and is an integral part of cultural identities Community garden Recognize and celebrate all heritage months A space where folks can actively and freely congregate/organize FOCUS AREA: BIPOC Communities - Public Visibility & Representation Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center work in tandem with the Promotional Coordinating Committee as they are the City entity that directly funds significant portion of Visitor Center’s operations. More education about our diverse community Feature Northern Chumash tribe Airport Displays Honoring Indigenous people of this region Other displays City push County for this. See examples of other airports provided by Northern Chumash presenters Partner with Visit SLOCAL for marketing and display efforts within the Airport Public art /murals – County buildings, schools, private bldgs. Minority community representation and history Use vacant downtown spaces to highlight minority communities. Feature a group for a month – rotate Partner/incentivize landlords to participate Involve Faith community /Leaders in outreach efforts Immigrant Center In conjunction with MCC In conjunction with Citizens’ Academy Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 187 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 21 FOCUS AREA: City/ Cal Poly/ Cuesta Partnership Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions Regular Leadership roundtable VP Diversity & Inclusion/Office of D&I / ASI presidents City Manager Teach In Program Change the Status Quo Conference Offer to Community Poly’s “State of” Series Expanded access to Community - how? when? Cuesta’s 21 Day Challenge Replicate for City residents CP/ Cuesta Programs in Mission Plaza Cosponsor with Parks &Rec Student Centers – CP’s Partner to fund and operate in the City Education for Dominant / majority community Increase knowledge, change perceptions/attitudes, concerns Volunteer opps for BIPOC students to intern at City In the Office for DEI or any Dept. Establish a college fund for young BIPOC residents; Educational equity With Cal Poly /Private donors/Work with Foundation Culturally competent therapists for undoc students City encourages Cal Poly, Cuesta FOCUS AREA: City as Influencer Recommendation / idea General description - concept – ideas - suggestions County Mental Health / Drug & Alcohol Services - providers need to have "undocumented" and LGBTQ+, cultural competency - More bilingual providers County – Justice System / Law Enforcement ● Sheriff / DA Fund Restorative Partners and restorative justice programs Housing Equity – County Planning + Other Depts, People’s Self-Help Housing Push for fair zoning Reduce discrimination in Section 8 Eliminate restrictive covenants Inclusive housing policies Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 188 Recommendations to City Council – DEI Task Force – January 2021 22 SLCUSD Curriculum changes, fixes, enhancements such as: • Northern Chumash education – more accurate • Remove the 4th grade mission project Host restorative justice approaches to help educators provide emotional support to BIPOC students in current events, climates, and national and state crisis and tragedy events School district should hire a DEI Director Training and cultural competency programming for teachers BIPOC YOUTH Empowerment programs Chamber of Commerce A "Leadership SLO" for diverse populations (Vision Unida was a parallel program for Latinx) Visitor Center suggestions per note in the previous section Community Foundation Participatory grantmaking - How can City bring in the wealth that is in the community, “crowd source” grants to BIPOC applicants. Fund a DEI-focused grant writer Human Relations Commission – Enhance the scope and influence (early ideas generated from preliminary discussions with HRC chair, City staff, TF PM. To vet w/ full TF+HRC) Increase community’s awareness that it exists and understanding of what it does Expand scope, expand impact. To be taken more seriously, appropriately tasked, supported, resourced A driver for change; Increase advisory role to City, how hold City accountable for its commitments to DEI? Increase advocacy role within the community (What is realistic authority, capacity, resources?) Name change - e.g. SLO City Commission on Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Host Town Halls, listening sessions, conduct bi-annual DEI community survey Responsible for intentional outreach, engagement and understanding current experiences and needs of margin alized and underrepresented communities in the City A conduit for the community. A body the community can bring concerns or complaints of inequity, bias, suggestions for DEI improvements. A conduit for URM communities to City/Council - via more outreach Steward City's DEI Action Plan - be an implementation partner Revamp its structure. Increase Number of Subcommittees (call Action Groups) to work on various target areas - Housing, Homelessness, DEI, Others? Create Subcommittee (Action Group) Model that includes a commissioner and Community Advocates. Increase Ways for Community and SMEs to be involved; Natural transition for interested TF members Youth involvement on the Commission - Create CP, Cuesta Commission positions, internships Remove Community Development Block Grants tasks; Administer future DEI grant funding cycles Allow non-City residents – must be in Co, w strong ties to City. If not as Commissioner, at least serve on Action Team Exhibit A 12/29Item 9 Packet Page 189