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02-03-16 PRC Agenda Packet�t Y Parks and Recreation Commission Regular Meeting on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 @ 5:30 p.m., Council Chambers CALL TO ORDER: Chair Whitener ROLL CALL: Commissioners Ryan Baker, Susan Olson, Michael Parolini, Ron Regier, Douglas Single, Susan Updegrove and Jeff Whitener Public Comment Period. At this time, you may address the Commission on items that are not on the agenda but are of interest to the public and within the subject matter jurisdiction of the Parks and Recreation Commission. The Commission may not discuss or take action on issues that are not on the agenda other than to briefly respond to statements made or questions raised, or to ask staff to follow up on such issues. PRC Meeting Agenda 1. Consideration of Minutes of Regular Meeting of January 6, 2016 2. Community Focus Input: Laguna Lake Golf Course (Hyfield, Ogden, Woods - 30 minutes) 3. Conceptual Review of Park Proposals for the San Luis Ranch Specific Plan (Rickenbach — 30 minutes) 4. Selection of date for Public Art Master Plan Community Workshop (Mudgett — 5 minutes) 5. Director's Report (Stanwyck - 5 minutes) 6. Subcommittee Liaison Reports Committee Liaison Adult and Senior Programming Baker Bicycle Advisory Regier City Facilities (Damon, golf, pool, joint use) Parolini Jack House Committee Updegrove Tree Committee Olson YSA I Single 7. Communications Adjourn to Regular Meeting of March 2, 2016 APPEALS: Administrative decisions by the Parks and Recreation Commission may be appealed to the City Council in accordance with the appeal procedure set forth in Chapter 1.20 of the San Luis Obispo Municipal Code. go The City of San Luis Obispo is committed to including the disabled in all of its services, programs, and activities. Please contact the Clerk or staff liaison prior to the meeting if you require assistance. Parks and Recreation Commission Meeting Minutes Council Chambers 990 Palm Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Wednesday, January 6, 2016, 5:30 p.m. CALL TO ORDER: Chair Davis called the meeting to order at 5:31 p.m. ROLL CALL: Chair Jeff Whitener and Commissioners Ryan Baker, Michael Parolini, Ron Regier, Susan Olson, Doug Single and Susan Updegrove ABSENT: COUNCIL: None STAFF: Shelly Stanwyck, Melissa Mudgett, Devin Hyfield, Shawn Tucker Public Comment None CONSIDERATION OF MINUTES of Regular Meeting of December 2, 2015 MOTION: (Regier/Updegrove) Approve the Minutes of December 5, 2015 as amended. Approved: 6 yes: 0 no: 1 absent (Single) COMMUNITY INPUT FOCUS: AQUATICS (Hyfield/Tucker) Director Stanwyck introduced the Recreation Supervisor (Devin Hyfield) and Aquatics Coordinator (Shawn Tucker) for an overview of the SLO Swim Center programs and practices. City staff provided an overview of the SLO Swim Center facilities which includes an Olympic size pool, therapy pool, two bathhouse, multi-purpose room and onsite building maintenance offices. The SLO Swim Center has been in operations since 1979. The Swim Center is operated by Parks and Recreation Department and maintained by the Public Works Department Building Maintenance staff. The annual operating budget for Parks and Recreation is $327,900 in expenses and $242,675 collected in annual revenues. This does not include the Public Works Maintenance budget for the swim center. Staff Tucker summarized recent minor capital projects and upgrades to the facility, such as restroom and locker room upgrades. Staff Tucker provided an overview of the most recent pool replastering capital project which included drain and fixture upgrades required for code compliance. The project began in August 2015 and will be re -opened for public use on January 18, 2016. Ribbon cutting ceremony will be held on February 8th at 4:00pm. Staff Tucker introduced a new swim program "100 Mile Club" as a way to encourage and challenge guests to swim 100 miles in one year or less as a way to encourage overall patron health. He explained what happens at the pool on a regular routine basis which includes partnership uses 1-1 (SeaHawks, SLO High, YMCA, etc.), maintenance, contract classes, swim lessons and recreational use. Staff is currently in process of offering adaptive swim lessons for individuals with disabilities. Water Safety days are offered annual and are designed to teach families about water safety and "safer" techniques. Pool staff are required to maintain certification in American Red Cross CPR training, monthly in-service training, and life safety State certification trainings. The SLO Swim Center seeks community engagement opportunities on a regular basis through a monthly email newsletter, phone message system, facility message board, SLO City Website, and an operations survey. Commission Comments Commissioner Single asked about increasing revenues through marketing efforts. Staff Hyfield responded that the City is currently undergoing a study of all city fee structures. Staff Tucker reminded the Commission that the intent of the SLO Swim Center is to provide low-cost recreational opportunities for the community to enjoy. Commissioner Updegrove said she is really looking forward to the reopening of the pool. Commissioner Parolini spoke about the overall budget for the SLO Swim Center does not clearly account for Public Works Maintenance budget and capital projects. Public Comment Louise Justice, SLO Swimmer, she supports the current fee structure for the public pool. She shared that the current warm water exercise instructor, Ava, is exceptional. Kevin McReynolds, SLO Swimmer, reminded the Commission of the unique gem the SLO Sinsheimer pool is for the community. He praised the City and staff for having such a well maintained public pool which serves a diverse need. Mary Ligere, SLO Swimmer, praised City staff for such a well maintained and beautiful facility. She added that during summer time (with use of the Blues Stadium) the parking lot is full and she suggested the Commission consider additional parking options. Marilyn Perselles, SLO Swimmer and Jack House Volunteer Docent, recognizes the value of this public facility. She asked the Commission to consider keeping the extended hours of the therapy pool for warm water exercise to 2:00pm. She added her appreciation of City staff. Cathy Marvier, SLO Swimmer and avid user of the therapy pool. She presented a few suggestion for the Commission to consider; extended hours Ilam-2pm, extended instructor hours, lam class run longer through the season, summer reading program for pool passes. 3. REVIEW AND RECOMMEND APPROVAL OF THE PUBLIC ART MASTER PLAN (Mudgett) Recreation Manager, Melissa Mudgett, provided the Commission with an overview of the draft Master Plan for public art. The Public Art Master Planning has been in process since November 2014 when City Council authorized the issuance of proposals for master planning consultant services. Staff Mudgett explained that this is the first Master Plan document for the public art 2 1-2 program, now 25 years old. Following extensive interviews, Designing Local of Columbus Ohio was selected for master planning efforts. Staff Mudgett shared with the Commissioners the extensive public engagement and outreach process for the Public Art Master Plan that included feedback from nearly one hundred individual stakeholder interviews with City Council, City staff, developers, artists, educators and community members. In addition, public engagement was sought through an interactive survey, webpage and social media. The consultant also facilitated a week-long series of community engagement activities in effort to bring the public art conversation directly to the community through a series of events. Staff Mudgett presented the major findings and recommendations in the draft Public Art Master Plan. Commission Comments Commissioner Parolini said the draft Master Plan did not provide sufficient justification for approving the recommendations. The Master Plan should identify specific resources and levels of resources needed to take the program to the next level. He did not support the recommendation to increase development fees at this time. Vice Chair Regier said he was impressed with the consultants. He expressed to the Commissioners that this is a "key moment" in the program to take a bold step. He urged to not pre -filter recommendations but to allow the Council to decide what they will/will not support. Commissioner Single gave an example of the City of Santa Fe where the public art manager position existed as a volunteer position. While supportive of a dedicated resource, he is not supportive of a full time staffing position at this time. Chair Whitener said he felt the master plan document format was confusing. He prefers a narrative layout similar to other City programs where the problems/issues are identified, solutions outlined and specific goals and actions. The Commissioners indicated their desire to receive input from the consultant, developers, community members, artists and planners about the recommendations as presented in the Public Art Master Plan. Staff Mudgett said that staff will develop a plan for a community workshop forum and return to the Commission with proposed workshop dates. 4. DIRECTOR'S REPORT Director Stanwyck presented an quick overview of Parks and Recreation Department upcoming items which included Ranger efforts to winterize for storms and regular trail maintenance. Sports field are currently closed due to weather conditions. The SLO Swim Center will be reopening following a significant capital project on January 18tH 3 1-3 CITY O.d ISO OW11 0K1]u OVlow11402M 7_i.Y1]0i;7o1Z1]4"4M • Adult and Senior Programming_ Commissioner Baker reported on Adults Sports. He said the Senior Center was closed over the holidays for annual maintenance and is scheduled to reopen on January 11th. There is no Adult Softball during winter. The Santa Rosa Ballfield netting has been installed. Basketball is currently underway with 700+ kids enrolled. Golf rounds were up in November. He added that the new Golf Recreation Coordinator has been putting on golf course events and he is doing a great job. • Bicycle Advisory: Vice Chair Regier said had not had a meeting. No Report. • City Facilities (Damon Garcia, Golf, Pool & Joint Use Facilities): Commissioner Parolini said he had no report. • Jack House Committee: Commissioner Updegrove reported that the Jack House is open this Friday night (January 8th) at 6:00pm for Art After Dark. • Tree Committee: Commissioner Olson said there was a good turnout for the December for Lunch n Learn for tree care. • Youth Sports: Commissioner Single said there was no meeting this month and had no report. 6. COMMUNICATIONS None. Adjourned at 7:55pm to the February 3, 2016 Regular Meeting in Council Chambers, 990 Palm Street, San Luis Obispo. Approved by the Parks and Recreation Commission on Melissa C. Mudgett, Parks and Recreation Department Manager 4 1-4 CITYO1~ SHIR LOIS OBISPO Meeting Date: February 3, 2015 Item Number: I PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION AGENDA REPORT SUBJECT: Conceptual review of park proposals for the San Luis Ranch Specific Plan, requesting feedback related to the plan development. PROJECT ADDRESS: 1035 Madonna Road FILE NUMBER: ANNX-1502-2015 BY: John Rickenbach, Contract Planner Phone Number: 805-610-1109 Email: JFRickenbach@aol.com FROM: Shelly Stanwyck, Parks and Recreation Director RECOMMENDATION: Receive a presentation regarding the development of a Specific Plan for the proposed San Luis Ranch project and provide conceptual input to questions posed by the applicant. SITE DATA Applicant I Coastal Community Builders Representative Brian Schwartz and Marshall Ochylski General Plan and Specific Plan Area (various Zoning land use designations including—residential, commercial, office, open space and agriculture consistent with the Land Use Element) Site Area 131.3 acres Environmental An Initial Study has been Status prepared to identify issues and guide EIR preparation. SUMMARY Coastal Community Builders has proposed a project that includes several entitlements that will ultimately lead to the development of the 131.3 -acre property. The project could include a mixture of residential and non-residential uses, as well as the preservation of agricultural uses and open space. The project site is currently outside the City, but within its Sphere of Influence, and would require annexation for development. The project as proposed is envisioned to implement the policies as articulated in the recent Land Use and Circulation Elements (LUCE) update, and be consistent with the development parameters set forth in the LUCE. 2-1 ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 2 1.0 SPECIFIC PLAN AND PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION'S PURVIEW The planning process for the development of a new neighborhood in the City includes multiple steps. In this instance, the property proposed for development must have a Specific Plan, providing general guidance as to basic land uses in the project area, adopted as its first major milestone. Following the adoption of a Specific Plan for the area, the project would continue to move through the development review process and return to the PRC for detailed review and ultimately consideration of recreational facilities to be built in the neighborhood. For the purposes of this meeting, the Commission will review the park facilities identified for the Specific Plan for a new residential neighborhood and provide preliminary input with respect to their potential consistency with policies and programs contained in the Parks and Recreation Element of the General Plan. Relevant excerpts from the General Plan are included in the Project Analysis section of this report for the Commission's guidance. The guidance provided by the Commission in the form of directional items and minutes will be incorporated in the Specific Plan and then used to guide the development of future and more detailed park plans. 2.0 PROJECT INFORMATION 2.1 Site Information/Setting The site is comprised of approximately 131 contiguous acres in unincorporated San Luis Obispo County, surrounded by areas within the City of San Luis Obispo, and within the City's Sphere of Influence, generally bounded by Madonna Road, Dalidio Drive and U.S. Highway 101. Dominant features at the site are the predominantly flat landform seasonally planted with row crops, an existing stand of eucalyptus trees in the southwest portion of the site, and the Dalidio farm home in the northwest portion of the site. Table 1: Site Information Site Size —131 acres Present Use & Development Agriculture Topography Flat Access Madonna Road, Dalidio Drive and Froom Ranch Road Surrounding Use/Zoning West: R-1 (low density residential) North: PF, C/OS-40, R-1, C -R -PD (Laguna Lake Park and surrounding open space, low density residential, and the U.S. post office) East: PF, O -PD (U.S. Highway 101, the City's wastewater treatment plant and a drive-in theater) South: C/OS-20, C -S, C -S -PD, C -T -SF, C-R (SLO City Farm, Target, variety of commercial service uses, and auto dealerships) 2-2 ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 3 2.2 Project Description The project is a Specific Plan, General Plan Amendment, and related actions that would allow for the development of the San Luis Ranch (formerly referred to as Dalidio) area as identified in the City's General Plan. The project includes a mix of residential, commercial, and office uses while preserving substantial areas of open space and agriculture on a 131.3 -acre property. The intent is for the project to be consistent with the development parameters described in the City's recently updated Land Use Element, which envisions up to 500 residential units, 200,000 square feet of commercial uses, 150,000 square feet of office, 200 hotel rooms, at least 5.8 acres of parks, while preserving 50% of the site in agriculture and open space. 2.2.1 Key Principals and Goals The proposed specific plan was conceived with the intent to implement the goals included in the LUCE, and was developed concurrently with the LUCE as it was adopted. It is based on the applicant's concept "CORE 4", which refers to the four underlying principles that will guide future development within the Specific Plan area: 1. Maintain and Promote San Luis Obispo's Agricultural Heritage 2. Provide Open Space and Recreation Areas 3. Deliver Diverse Housing Opportunities, Including Workforce Housing; and 4. Create a Multimodal Community Seamlessly Integrated into the Existing Circulation System The draft Specific Plan includes the following Goals with respect to Agriculture, Open Space, Parks, and Recreation, which are intended to guide the overall design of the open space and parks network onsite, and how it would integrate into the rest of the City: 1. Provide agricultural, open space and recreational resources on-site in a manner consistent with the City's General Plan. 2. Preserve the site's agricultural facilities to build a sense of place and agricultural heritage. 3. Educate and actively involve locals and visitors in Central Coast agriculture. 4. Provide a restored and enhanced natural habitat area along the Prefumo Creek corridor for passive recreation. 5. Ensure parks and recreational facilities reflect community values as expressed in the General Plan. 6. Provide a variety of recreational amenities that support the diverse needs of the community at large and set the standard for multimodal community design. 7. Provide a natural environment and recreational amenities for residents and the broader community in order to encourage an active, healthy lifestyle. 8. Provide enhanced open space by introducing new amenities throughout the project site, including a key link to the Bob Jones City to Sea Trail, as well as an active linear park with a fitness loop, a central park, pocket parks and bicycle and pedestrian trails. 9. Provide recreational opportunities for the community that accommodate all fitness levels. 2-3 ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 4 All but the second and third goals are relevant to the PRC and its purview. It should also be noted that some of these are either slightly different from, or expand upon, those that are currently included in the version of the draft Specific Plan available for review. 2.2.2 Proposed Land Use Table 2 (from Section 8.1.4 of the LUCE) summarizes the proposed project relative to land use designations and development potential: Table 2: Proposed land use desiLynations and development potential Type Designations % of Site Minimum Maximum Allowed Residential LDR 350 units 500 units MDR MHDR HDR Commercial NC 50,000 SF 200,000 SF CC Office/High Tech O 50,000 SF 150,000 SF Hotel/Visitor-Serving 200 rooms Parks PARK 5.8 ac Open Space/Agriculture OS Minimum 50% No maximum AG Public n/a Infrastructure n/a Figure 1 shows the proposed zoning map for the project, which would accommodate various land uses, including agriculture. 2-4 ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 5 Figure 1: Proposed land use designations for the San Luis Ranch Specific Plan 3.0 PROJECT ANALYSIS 3.1 Situation and General Plan Guidance The subject site is designated as a Specific Plan area under the General Plan, intended to accommodate development generally consistent with what the applicant proposes. Section 8.1.4 of the Land Use Element provides direction for future development under the Specific Plan: "This project site should be developed as a mixed use project that maintains the agricultural heritage of the site, provides a commercial / office transition to the existing commercial center to the north, and provides a diverse housing experience. Protection of the adjacent creek and a well-planned integration into the existing circulation system will be required. " 2-5 ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 6 Parks and recreation are not explicitly mentioned in the policy framework for the site, but the Land Use Element establishes a performance standard to include at least 5.8 acres of parkland within the Specific Plan area (see Table 2). The General Plan Parks and Recreation Element (PRE) provides policy guidance for park requirements for residential development, the most relevant of which are as follows: Policy 3.13.1. The City shall develop and maintain a park system at a rate of 10 acres of parkland per 1,000 residents. Five acres shall be dedicated as a neighborhood park. The remaining five acres required under the 10 acres per 1,000 residents in the residential annexation policy may be located anywhere within the City's park system as deemed appropriate. Policy 3.13.2. Parks shall be designed to meet a variety of needs depending on park size, location, natural features and user demands. Policy 3.13.8. Park site acquisition should enhance the City's recreational trails, pedestrian transportation, and open spaces in keeping with adopted policies. Policy 3.15.1. San Luis Obispo residents shall have access to a neighborhood park within 0.5 to 1.0 mile walking distance of their residence. Policy 3.15.3. All residential annexation areas shall provide developed neighborhood parks at the rate of 5 acres per 1,000 residents. 3.2 Specific Plan — Allowed and Proposed Park and Recreation Facilities Specific Plan Parks Concept. The applicant's concept under the Specific Plan is to integrate parks, open space, and agriculture to the extent possible. As stated in the plan: "San Luis Ranch takes an integrated, comprehensive approach to planning and managing open and recreational spaces. As a high priority and key feature of the Plan, the proposed open spaces envelop and extend into future residential and commercial development, reinforcing the visual prominence of agricultural uses at the southern gateway to San Luis Obispo. The design focuses on connecting open spaces throughout the neighborhood, expanding the City's network of parks and paths, protecting natural resources, preserving the City's agricultural character, and contributing to a sustainable future. " Attachment 1 includes figures that illustrate this concept, showing how bike trails could be integrated into natural open space features, such as near creeks. 2-6 ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 7 Section 2.4.1 of the San Luis Ranch Specific Plan provides the following direction for park planning within the area: "The park system is intended to provide active recreation, add to the natural beauty of the area, and create a better neighborhood. San Luis Ranch will include many forms, including a large central neighborhood park, pocket parks, an active linear park, green space, greenways, pedestrian and bike paths, and sports fields. " Section 2.5.5 of the Specific Plan elaborates on this concept: "San Luis Ranch will provide a wide variety of park and open space amenities that are closely aligned with the values set forth in the General Plan. Parklands will include an active linear park with a fitness loop and multi -use trails, a central neighborhood park featuring both active and passive recreational opportunities, and pocket parks interspersed throughout the residential areas to provide enhanced pedestrian connectivity and visual openness. An offer of dedication will be made for the Bob Jones Bike Trail Extension, enabling connection to Laguna Lake Park and Madonna Road Bike Path. " Allowed Park and Recreation Uses. Parks and/or related facilities are allowed in four zones under the Specific Plan: • Neighborhood General (NG -1) • Neighborhood General (NG -2) • Neighborhood Commercial (NC) • Parks and Open Space (P -OS) Allowed park and recreation uses within these zones are described below. Parks and playgrounds are an allowed use within the Neighborhood General (NG -1) zone, which is the central single-family residential neighborhood. This area features a proposed centrally - located 3.39 -acre neighborhood park (see Attachment 1 for concept). At this stage, park amenities have not been programmed, but it may be anticipated that it would include features typical of other similarly -sized neighborhood parks within the City following specific direction from the PRC at a later hearing. Parks and playgrounds are an allowed use within the Neighborhood General (NG -2) zone, which is a higher density (minimum 1,000 SF lot size) multi -family neighborhood accessible from Madonna Road, across from Laguna Lake Park. No parks have been programmed in this area, although pocket parks could be included, based on the following direction within the plan's Design Guidelines: "Plazas, courtyards, pocket parks, and outdoor cafes should be designed in an inviting manner that encourages pedestrian use through the incorporation of trellises, fountains, art, seating, and shade trees. " 2-7 ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 8 Parks and playgrounds are an allowed use within the Neighborhood Commercial (NC) zone. No parks have been programmed in this area, although it anticipated that pocket parks could be included. A variety of park and recreation facilities are allowed within the Parks and Open Space (P -OS) zone under the Specific Plan. The intent of the P -OS zone is "...to provide areas for active and passive recreation that includes community parks, neighborhood parks, pedestrian paths, and habitat restoration areas. This zone accommodates trails, paths, playground equipment, and limited structures necessary to support the specific uses. " The following park or recreation -related uses are allowed within this zone: • Community gardens • Parks and playgrounds • Special events (use permit required) • Sports and active recreation facilities (with Planning Commission approval) Proposed Park and Recreation Uses. The applicant proposes the following park and recreation facilities within the Specific Plan area: • Neighborhood Park (3.39 acres) The neighborhood park would be the central feature of the single-family residential neighborhood within the Specific Plan area, and centrally located within the entire plan area. A neighborhood park concept is included in Attachment 1. The Specific Plan also includes other recreational features such as a fitness loop, and various recreational amenities within the linear open space along the creek and fitness loop. The Specific Plan accommodates the potential for pocket parks and passive open space. Overall, the Specific Plan does not achieve the required 5.8 acres of parks, but the applicant is seeking credit to account for the shortfall, either through the provision of other onsite recreational amenities, in lieu fees, or both. ANNX-1502-2015; 1035 Madonna Road (San Luis Ranch Project) February 3, 2016 Page 9 4.0 APPLICANT QUESTIONS The applicant has proposed the following questions for PRC discussion and direction: 1. Are there any significant concerns regarding the general site layout, park design, and recreational facilities or use? 2. Please provide general feedback regarding the how the San Luis Ranch Specific Plan meets the city-wide priorities for parks and recreation. 3. What types of active recreation would you like to see incorporated on-site? 4. Would you like to see community gardens and orchards incorporated to serve citywide residents? S. The Specific Plan as proposed is intended to meet the L UCE requirement for 50% of the project site to remain in Open Space/Agriculture, utilizing on and off-site open space. The L UCE also requires 5.8 acres of parks. In addition to the formal parks located within the residential neighborhoods, the Specific Plan proposes integrating recreational facilities within the open space areas (fitness loop, multi -use trails, etc). Do the Commissioners consider these areas as parks? In addition to fulfilling that area requirement, the applicant is asking whether these public amenities are eligible for a credit for the cost of providing community -wide and regional recreational facilities. The applicant would also like to receive parks and recreation facilities credit for the integrated community -wide and regional recreational facilities. 6. Would you like to see and improvements added to Laguna Lake Parkas an offset to the on-site parks and recreation requirements? 7. Would you like to seethe payment of in lieu Parks and Recreational fees for use in other areas of the community as an offset to the on-site Parks and recreation requirements? 5.0 RECOMMENDATION It is recommended that the Commission receive a presentation regarding the San Luis Ranch project and provide input and direction specifically relating to questions posed in Section 4.0. 6.0 ATTACHMENTS 1. Conceptual Park -related Illustrations from the draft Specific Plan 2. Citywide Open Space Network 3. PRE Appendix C - Park Land Acquisition and Improvement in Annexation Areas 4. PRE Figure 2.00.1 — Park Facilities in SLO W' Open Space and Park Plan SAN LUIS RANCH PRESERVE AND TRAILHEAD 4, 1�17- CENTRAL �,"", - NEIGHBORHCM PARK X5 FITNESS LOOP AND PARKWAY ALONG FROOM RANCH WAY y7 � 7 ] Tr `5('� ) 'j-4 Ism POCKET PARKS AGRICULTURE Attachment 1 2-10 �P I• i ♦ �a Attachment 1 2-10 Central Neighborhood Park CENTRAL NEIGHBORHOOD PARK Attachment 1 2-11 Neighborhood Park Concept Flower maze Split rail fence PERIMETER PATH WITH DROUGHT TOLERANT LANDSCAPING HALF BASKETBALL COURTS Attachment 1 CROSSWALK TO LINEAR PARK AND OPEN SPACE GREENROOF PICNIC SHELTER WITH BBQ t _ TRACTOR, WAGON AND HAY BALES (2-5 YRS OLD) FLOWER CANOPY MAZE AND BOULDERS (2-12 YRS OLD) S WINGSET, SPINNER (5-12 YRS OLD) DRY STORMWATER RETENTION AREA, BOULDERS, AND LANDSCAPING DRY STORMWATER RETENTION AREA, BOULDERS, AND LANDSCAPING BOCCE BALL COURT — 'S // AGRARIAN GREENROOF PICNIC SHELTER AND BBQ Spinner Bocce ball court Tractor and hay bales Half basketball courts 2-12 Attachment 1 Fitness Loop and Parkway y 11% i ��v 4 } - q q qQ q Q f '. q �q qq '15 (5- Q) Q) FITNESS LOOP AND r 3 r PARKWAY ALONG ? �r SECTION A FROOM RANCH WAY 2-13 Attachment 1 Recreation within Linear Open Space , BBQ OVEN / COMMUNITY PICNIC, AREA, SEE ENLARGEMENT b �r COMMUNITY " GARDENS "PLAY MOUNDS" AND BOULDERS, �) "PLAY MOUNDS" AND BOULDERS NATURAL EDUCATION 3 �r� xSITTING AREA PRESENTATION AREA��.` SCULPTURE e GARDENBRIDGL ': 3r SITTING AREA "PLAY MOUNDS„ AND BOULDERS' SCULPTU BARD, PLAY MOUNDS AND BOULDERS'~ TTJ N e3 r5 Q SCULPTURE GARDEN 2-14 Attachment 1 Recreation -Creek Interface Concept 2-15 Attachment 1 Community Picnic Area PIS DETENTION BOULDFRS/SFAT WALL iii OVENS AND PICNIC TABLES Nip BBQ OVIEN AND PICNIC TABLFS SCULPTUREBIKE RACK y � �51�gT L' ■ , _.! VIFIGWBOVWOOD ii. ek v_ Natural educational presentation area Community gardens Sculpture gardens sitting are ifs BBQ and community ovensffire pit 2-16 Citywide Open Space Network Attachment 2 MA 2-17 Attachment 3 Parks and Recreation { APPENDIX C Park Land Acquisition and Improvement in Annexation Areas A. OVERVIEW The purpose of these guidelines is to provide a framework for achieving General Plan park system goals in annexation areas. While these guidelines are not intended to be "hard and fast rules," they are intended to provide sufficient direction to help ensure that: 1. We clearly communicate our goals —and method for achieving them —to those proposing residential annexations in order to avoid any misunderstandings about development requirements and related costs. 2. We achieve these goals in the most effective manner possible. B. GENERAL PLAN POLICIES The General Plan sets forth two key policies regarding the City's park system standards, and new development's responsibility to pay for the cost of the park land necessary to serve it: 3. The City shall develop and maintain a park system at the rate of 10 acres of park land per 1,000 residents (PR 6.1.1). 4. The costs of public facilities and services needed for new development shall be borne by the new development, unless the community chooses to help pay the costs for a certain development to obtain community -wide benefits (LU 1.14). C. IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES In accordance with General Plan policies, the City will use the following guidelines in acquiring and improving park land whenever State law allows us to do so. This is most likely to occur in the case of annexations. However, these guidelines are also applicable whenever discretionary approvals of the City are requested, such as zone changes, general plan amendments or development agreements. 5. Park land acquisition and improvement goal. The City will achieve a ratio of 10 acres of park per 1,000 residents projected to reside in the annexation area. This includes land and improvements. a. Privately owned and maintained landscaped areas such as interior parkways and community greens may be considered as contributing to this goal. This will be determined on a case-by-case basis depending on the purpose and nature of such areas, and the level of public access to them. b. School sites may also be considered as contributing towards this goal. This will be determined on a case-by-case basis depending on the location of the proposed school site to planned park sites, and the likelihood that the school site will be used as a "joint use" facility. c. Open space will not typically be counted as park land in meeting the 10 acres per 1,000 residents standard. The City's General Plan is clear in its distinctions between open space and parks, and the purpose of these guidelines is to help implement the General Plan's park system goals, not open space goals. 6. Property owner dedication and developer improvement requirement. Through an annexation agreement, the City will generally require the dedication and full improvement of required park land by the property owner and/or developer (applicant) as a condition of the annexation. This means that the City will typically not take the lead role in acquiring and improving parks in annexation areas; this is the applicant's responsibility similar to the construction of other on-site, project -related infrastructure Page 7-31 2-18 Chapter 7 Attachment 3 improvements such as streets, sidewalks, storm drainage collection, water distribution lines and sewer collection lines. 7. Acquisition and improvement phasing. The phasing of when dedication and improvements are required by the applicant will be set forth in the annexation agreement, specific plan or development plan. While this will be determined on a case-by-case basis, land dedication and improvements should generally be phased as follows: a. Land should be dedicated upon annexation. b. Phase 1 improvements (as defined in the annexation agreement, specific plan or development plan) should be completed before the first certificate of occupancy is issued; other improvement phases and standards may be established in the annexation agreement, specific plan or development plan. c. All improvements should be completed by the time that about two-thirds of the units are available for occupancy. 8. Fees in -lieu of dedication and improvement. Depending on the circumstances, the City may prefer to develop some portion of the required park acquisition and improvements on property that is not being annexed. This would generally occur when the City plans to meet part of the "10 acres per 1,000 residents" requirement through a community -wide facility that is not located in the annexation area, or when the annexation area is not large enough to dedicate and improve a meaningful amount of park land. Whenever fees are paid in lieu of dedicating and improving park land, they will be: a. Restricted solely for park land acquisition and improvement. b. Determined, assessed, collected and accounted for in a manner consistent with state requirements for development impact fees as set forth in AB 1600. c. Used for park land and improvements that directly serve the annexation area, unless a finding is made that the area is already adequately served by existing neighborhood facilities. In this case, fees will be used to acquire or improve community -wide facilities. 9. Case-by-case review. The following issues will be addressed on a case-by-case basis as part of the specific plan or development review process: a. Amount of park land to be dedicated and improved within the annexation areas versus the amount that will be met through the payment of in -lieu fees in meeting the overall goal of 10 acres of parks per 1,000 residents. b. Location and type of park land to be developed in the annexation area. c. Value of the park land and improvements that will not be developed in the annexation, and the resulting amount of fees to be paid. d. Timing as to when these fees will be paid. e. Timing as to when park improvements will be made by the applicant. f. Distribution of any in -lieu fees between neighborhood versus community parks and facilities, and the need to redress any deficit in the availability of neighborhood parks in the vicinity of the annexation area. Page 7-32 2-19 to x o d ° w '^ r d Z• o. O •w�L� N °RO'1�.'NnN �2mmd U�� Odm.M>` YOm. 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