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HomeMy WebLinkAboutItem 09 - COUNCIL READING FILE_a_Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan 2020City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Letter of Promulgation LETTER OF PROMULGATION April 21, 2020 To the Citizens, Visitors, Employees and Officials of the City of San Luis Obispo: The preservation of life, property and the environment is an inherent responsibility of local, state, and federal government. The City of San Luis Obispo has prepared this Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan to help ensure that responsibility is met. While no plan can completely anticipate all events, good plans and procedures carried out by knowledgeable and trained personnel can minimize losses. This plan provides policy and guidance for the coordination of planning efforts involving the many City emergency and related organizations serving the citizens of, and visitors to, the City of San Luis Obispo. The Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan is an extension of the State Emergency Plan, and is written to be compliant with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Framework. It will be reviewed and exercised periodically and revised as necessary to meet changing conditions. Experiences based upon and gained from emergency drills and exercises, actual emergencies or other incidents, or lessons learned from other sources, can result in a need to change or update the Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan and/or related documents. As a result, changes to the Plan which do not result in changes to policies made and/or approved by the City Council can be made by the City’s Fire Chief and/or other agencies, as appropriate; however such changes can be reviewed by the County Office of Emergency Services (OES) to verify uniformity with the San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operations Plan. It may also be modified if responsibilities, procedures, laws, rules, or regulations pertaining to emergency management and operations change. The Council gives its full support to this plan and urges all officials, employees and citizens, individually and collectively, to do their share in the total emergency preparedness effort of the City of San Luis Obispo. This letter promulgates the City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan, constitutes the adoption of the City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. This Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan becomes effective on approval by the City of San Luis Obispo Council on the date indicated below. Original copy signed by Heidi Harmon, Mayor, on behalf of the City and the Emergency Services Director. Heidi Harmon, Mayor Date City of San Luis Obispo Derek Johnson, City Manager/Emergency Services Director Date City of San Luis Obispo City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department Developed by: David L. Mathe Disaster Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 1 of 35 PLAN ADOPTION This is the official City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan for responding to various disasters causing damage in the City of San Luis Obispo. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below. COMPREHENSIVE DISASTER LEADERSHIP PLAN The San Luis Obispo Fire Department is responsible for Disaster Leadership and Preparedness coordination and will revise Hazard Specific Annexes and related Support Materials, as appropriate. This Plan is Tactical in nature not Policy, and as such revisions does not require City Council approval. The plan covers disasters impacting the City of San Luis Obispo and it is broken down into the following types of major events: A. Earthquake B. Hazardous Materials C. Multiple Casualty D. Transportation E. Fire F. Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter G. Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant H. Adverse Weather The City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan, including the Hazard Speci fic Annexes, was developed using State Multiple Hazard Functional Planning guidelines, San Luis Obispo Local Hazard Mitigation Plan, State of California Disaster Plan, National Disaster Recovery Framework, National Infrastructure Protection Plan, FEMA Continuation Guidance, and the National Response Plan. As such the Plan, complies with state and federal mandates. Compatibility with the San Luis Obispo County Disaster Management Plans was designed into the City of San Luis Obispo Plan. Common elements in the Plan include an annual review and update of all plans, regular field or tabletop exercises for all plans, automatic Emergency Operations Center (EOC) activation trigger points, and incident management using both the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) at the Emergency Disaster Operations Center (EOC) level and the Incident Command System (ICS) at the field response level. Unified Command will provide leadership of a Disaster with the P ublic Safety Chiefs and Public Works providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. _____________________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Date: City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 2 of 35 Plan Summary Section Page Plan Adoption 1 Table of Contents 2 SECT ION I – INTRODUCTION 4 A. Purpose 4 B. Objectives 4 C. Plan Organization 5 Part 1 – Summary 5 Part 2 – Hazard-Specific Annexes 5 Part 3 – Resource Directory 5 Part 4 – Recovery Resource Directory and Plan 6 Part 5 – Emergency Operations Center Position Checklists 6 Part 6 – Debris Management 7 Part 7 – Continuation of Operations and Reconstitution of Government 7 D. Persons with Functional and Access Needs 8 E. Plan Coordination 9 F. Disaster Preparedness 9 SECTION II – CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS 10 A. Basic Elements of Disaster Response 10 B. Mutual Aid Concepts 10 C. San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services 11 SECTION III – HAZARD IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS 11 A. Earthquake 11 B. Hazardous Material 13 C. Multiple Casualty 14 D. Transportation 15 E. Fire 16 F. Civil Dis turbance—Terrorism—Active Shooter 17 G. Diablo Canyon Power Plant 19 H. Adverse Weather 20 City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 3 of 35 SECTION IV – DISASTER MANAGEMENT 22 A. Incident Management System (NIMS and SEMS) 22 B. Incident Command System 22 C. Depa rtment Operating Center (DOC) 22 D. City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Organization 23 E. Responsibilities 24 1. Emergency Services Di rector 24 2. Field I ncident Comm ander (IC) 25 3. EOC Safety Officer and Security Officer 25 4. Public Information Officer 25 5. Liaison Officer 26 6. Policy Group 26 7. Operations Section 26 8. Plans and Intelligence Section 27 9. Logis tics Section 27 10. Finance and Administration Section 27 Emergency Operations Center Position Assignments 28 SECTION V - PROGRAM MAINTENANCE 30 A. City of San Luis Obispo Municipal Code 30 B. Plan and Procedure Maintenance 30 C. Disaster Resources Maintena nce 31 D. Training 31 E. Revision Record 32 SECTION VI– AUTHORITIES AND REF ERENCES33 A. Authorities 33 1. Federal 33 2. State 33 3. Local 33 B. References 33 EMERGENCY OPERATIO NS CENTER POSITION FLOW CHART 35 City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 4 of 35 SECTION I - INTRODUCTION A. Purpose The purpose of the City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Leadership Plan (hereafter referred to as the “Plan”) is to describe the City of San Luis Obispo policies and concepts for responding to major disasters that could affect the health, safety, and property of the public within the City of San Luis Obispo. B. Objectives The objectives of this Plan are to: • Protect the public and property in the City of San L uis Obispo. • Establish official City of Sa n Luis Obispo policy for response to disasters utilizing National Incident Management System (NIMS), the California Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS), and the Incident Command System (ICS). • Identify authorities and assign responsibilities for planning and response activities. • Identify the scope of potential hazards which form a basis for planning. • Identify other j urisdictions and organizations with which planning, and disaster response activities should be coordinated. • Establish the City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Organization that will lead the disaster response and recovery. • Establish the City of San Luis Obispo policy for providing Disaster information to the public. • Outline pre-planned response actions that will be taken by the City of San Luis Obispo disaster personnel to mitigate the Disaster's effects. • Establish responsibilities for the maintenance of the overall City of San Luis Obispo disaster preparedness program. • Establish basic operational protocols and gui delines for activating and operating the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 5 of 35 C. Plan Organization The City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership, Plan Summary consists of eig ht (7) parts. An abstract of each part is provided below: Part 1 – Plan Summa ry The Plan Summary serves as an overview for el ements of response that is common to all types of disasters. Part 2 - Hazard-Specific Annexes The hazard-specific plans that are used to implement the concepts and policies set forth in this Plan. Each Annex covers the response elements specific to the type of disaster addressed. The annexes contained in Part 2 are as follows: A. Earthquake B. Hazardous Materials C. Multiple Casualty D. Transportation E. Fire F. Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter G. Diablo Canyon Nu clear Power Plant H. Adverse Weather Part 3 – Resource Directory City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory The Resource Directory consists of support materials and references and is a stand-alone document. The materials are intended to provide Disaster personnel with information and data to support the City's Disaster response efforts. Resource Directory materials in Part 3 include: 1. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging 2. City of San Luis Obispo Phone Directory (Confidential Numbers-limited distribution) 3. City of San Luis Obispo Reverse 911 Process 4. Disaster Alerting System (EAS) 5. Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES) Activation 6. City of San Luis Obispo Resources 7. County of San Luis Obispo Resources 8. Persons with Access and Function Needs 9. Senior Care Facilities City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 6 of 35 Note: Parts 2 and 3, the Hazard Specific Annexes and Support Documents, are tactical contain information that changes frequently. Part 4 – Recovery Plan Part 4 of this Plan consists of Recovery materials and references and is a stand-alone document. The materials are intended to provide information and data to support the City's Disaster recovery efforts. 1. Concept of Operations 2. Recovery Operations Organization 3. Recovery Operations Responsibilities 4. Recovery Damage/Safety Assessment 5. Documentation 6. Disaster Assistance Process for Public Agencies 7. Hazard Mitigation – Planning and Prevention 8. After Action/Improvement Plan Reporting Part 5 – Emergency Operations Center Position Checklists Part 5 of this Plan consists of SEMS/NIMS Emergency Operations Center Position Checklists. The checklists are intended to provide information to city Staff who are designated as Section Chief/Coordinators and their support staff. Position Checklists include: 1. Emergency Operations Center Staff 2. Command Staff 3. General Staff 4. Operations Section 5. Logistics Section 6. Finance and Administration 7. Plans and Intelligence City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 7 of 35 Part 6 – Debris Management Part 6 of this Plan consists of Debris Management materials and references and is a stand- alone document. The materials are intended to provide information and data to support the City's Debris Management. The Debris Management Plan Consists of the following elements: 1. Applicant Eligibility 2. Concept of Operations 3. Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction (TSDR) Sites 4. Debris Removal 5. Eligible Work 6. Debris Reduction Methods 7. Demolition of a Damaged Public Facility or Privately-Owned Building 8. Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction Site Closeout Procedures 9. Debris Forecasting and Estimating 10. Debris Monitoring 11.Organization and Responsibilities 12.Administration and Logistics 13.Authorities, References and Regulations Part 7 -- Continuation of Operations and Reconstitution of Government 1. Continuation of Operations and Reconstitution of Government A. Continuation of Operations B.Reconstitution of Government a.Lines of Succession b. Temporary Seat of Government and Temporary Emergency Op erations Center c.Vital Records 2. Essential Functions 3. Staffing and Resource Requirement 4. Facilities Planning 5. Contact Information 6. Reporting to work following a disaster a. Personal and Family Safety b. When to Report c. Where to Report City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 8 of 35 D. Persons with Functional and Access Needs The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 is incorporated into Disaster preparedness plans. This law prohibits discrimination based on disability. A best practice used to effectively address the needs of persons with disabilities or access and functional needs in Disaster preparedness plans is establishing a process to pre-identify resources which may be used to fulfill requests from these individuals for reasonable accommodations they may need in Disaster situations. Functional Needs Support Services (FNSS) are defined as services that enable children and adults with or without disabilities who have access and functional needs to maintain their health, safety, and independence in a general population shelter. This may include personal assistance services (PAS), durable medical equipment (DME), consumable medical supplies (CMS), and reasonable modification to common practices, policies and procedures. Individuals requiring FNSS may have sensory, physical, mental health, cogni tive and/or intellectual disabilities affecting their capability to function independently without assistance. Additionally, the elderly, women in the late stages of pregnancy, and individuals requiring communication assistance and bariatric support may also benefit from FNSS. On July 22, 2004, Executive Order 13347 was issued (Individuals with Disabilities in Disaster Preparedness), directing the federal government to work together with state, local and tribal governments, as well as private organizations, to appropriately address the safety and security needs of people with disabilities. The City of San Luis Obispo will make every effort to comply with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), related to disaster and disaster-related programs, services and activities for individuals with disabilities, access and functional needs. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 9 of 35 E. Plan Coordination Almost all major disasters result in response by more than one jurisdiction. The following is a sample listing of jurisdictions where Plan development and response coordination is essential: • Federal Disa ster Management Agency (FEMA) • California Governor’s Offi ce of Emergency Services (CalOES) • San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services (OES) • San Luis Obispo County Fire Department • San Luis Obispo County Sheriff • All Cities and Special Districts within San Luis Obispo County F. Disaster Preparedness The preparedness phase involves activities unde rtaken in advance of a Disaster. These activities develop operational capabilities and improve effective response to disasters. Disaster plans are developed and revised to guide disaster response and increase avail able resources. Planning activities include developing hazard analyses, training response personnel, and improving public information and communications systems. Those identified in this plan, havi ng eithe r a prim ary or support mission relative to respons e and recovery, should prepare departmental Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) and checklists detailing personnel assignments, policies, notification rosters, and resource lists. Department personnel should be acquainted with these SOGs and checklists through periodi c training in the activation and execution procedures. Preparedness activities are part of the implementation of the Emergency Services Act (ESA), the Master Mutual Aid Agreement (MMAA), and the State Emergency Plan. This plan is considered in effect at all times to provide authorization to accomp lish essential preparedness actions. The receipt of a warning or the observation that a disaster is imminent or likely to occur soon will initiate increased readiness actions. Action s to be accomplished include, but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Review and update of Disaster plans. • Dissemination of accurate and timely Disaster public information. • Acce lerated training of permanent and volunteer staff. • Inspection of critical facilities. • Recruitm ent of additi onal staff and volunteers; as appropriate. • Mobilization of resources. • Testing warning and communications sys tems. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 10 of 35 SECTION II - CONCEPTS OF OPERATION This se ction outlines the con cepts under which the City of San Luis Obispo will respond to disasters. How the City of San Luis Obispo responds to disasters will depend on the type and magnitude of the situation, many elements of response are similar. A. Basic Elements of Disaster Response Some of the basic elements of disaster response common to all types of disasters include the following: • Event Recognition • Notification of Response Personnel • Mobilization of Response Personnel • Activation of Di saster Response Facilities and Resour ces • Situa tion Re porting and Assessment • Public Alerting and Informati on • Protective Action Determination and Implementation • Reentry and Recovery Response to all disasters involves the above elements. The type and magnitude of the disaster will determine the level of response necessary. Some disaster s can be preceded with a buildup period lasting from hours to days, if recognized may provide advanced warning to the population groups which might be affected. In certain instances, all the disasters addressed in the Plan could be preceded by events that could be recogni zed as adv ance warning. These slow building events allow disaster organizations and resources to be mobilized and prepare for response. In other instances, disasters can occur with little or no advance warning. Little advance warning requires disaster organizations and resources to be mobilized just prior to or after the onset of the event. Since Di saster Preparedness involves planning for worst-case events, the City of San Luis Obispo must be prepared to respond promptly and effectively and have a provision for mutual aid resources if the response effort requires resources beyond the City of San Luis Obispo capabilities. The Hazard-Specific Annexes in Part 2 of this Plan provide the detailed concepts of operations for each type of disaster addressed in this Plan. B. Mutual Aid Concepts It is the policy of the City of San Luis Obispo to utilize Mutual Aid as the primary means to increase personnel and resources for the City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Organization. Mutual A id procedures should be consistent with the Califor nia Master Mutual Aid Agreement, California Law Enforcement Mutual Aid Plan, California Fire and Rescue Mutual Aid System, and the San Luis Obispo County Fire, Rescue Mutual Aid Plan, and South San Luis Obispo County Coastal Incident Response Plan. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 11 of 35 Mutual Aid assistance may be provided by one or more of the following: • California Master Mutual Aid Agreement • California Fire and Rescue Emergency Plan • California Law Enforcement Mutual Aid Plan • Local Mutual Aid Agreements • Medical/Health Mutual Aid Plan • Publi c Works Mutual Aid Agreement and Plan • Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Disaster Assistance Act • California Fire Assistance Agreement Mutual Aid, like the Incident Command System (ICS), is provided under the direct control of the requesting jurisdiction and Public Works Mutual Aid Plan under the broad direction of the Incident Commander. C. San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services The Office of Emergency Service s (OES) coordinates all requests for assistance from San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at, 805.781.1144. SECTION III - HAZARD IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS This sectio n provides a general overview of the potential threats to the City of San Luis Obispo. Each threat annex of the Plan is intended to be stand-alone documents. Each of the annexes examine the potential effects that could result if a Disaster of that type were to occur. There are several threats which could impact the City of San Luis Obispo, including earthquakes, hazardous material incidents, fires, wildland urban interface fires, nuclear power plant, civil disturbance, active shooter, terrorism, and adverse weather. The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identifica tion and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. A. Earthquake The Richter scale is a method of rating earthquakes based on strength using an indirect measure of released energy. Each one-point increase, on the Richter scale, corresponds to a 10-fold increase in the amplitude of the seismic shock waves and a 32-fold increase in energy released. As an example, an earthquake registering 7.0 on the Richter scale releases over 1,000 times more energy than an earthquake registering 6.0. Hazard Analysis 1. Situation Earthquakes are a threat t o the City of San Luis Obispo due to several fault zones in the vicinity. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 12 of 35 2.Potential Threats – Fault Systems There are several active or potentially active fault systems throughout the region. Small earthquakes, in the range of about magnitude 2.0 – 2.7 and smaller, occur occasionally throughout and near San Luis Obispo. There are five (5) known seismically active faults that run through San Luis Obispo County that include the Los Osos-Edna faults, San Andreas Fault, the Nacimiento- Rinconada Fault, the Hosgri Fault, and the San Simeon Fault. The San Andreas Fault is capable of an 8.5 magnitude earthquake and the greatest threat. Liquefaction occurs when ground shaking causes loose, saturated soils to lose strength and act like viscous fluid. Liquefaction causes two types of ground failure: lateral spread and loss of bearing strength. Loss of bearing strength causes structures to collapse. 3. Potential Impacts Potential impacts that may occur as a result of a light-to -heavy damage earthquake impacting the City include: building collaps e (particularly un-reinforced masonry structures) causing need for rescue; mass injuries; hazardous materials releases; major fires; utility disruptions; major natural gas leaks; communication disruptions; need for evacuation ; command and coordination prob lems; roadway and transportation system disruptio ns; and hospital/school disruptions. The potential direct and indirect consequences of a major earthquake will severely stress the resources of the City and will require a high level of self- help, coordination and coopera tion. Out-of- city assistance from other local, regional, state, federal and private agencies may be delayed by more than 72 hours, depending on the regional severity of the earthquake. For the purpose of this Plan, earthquakes will be divided into four categories as follows: a. No Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes no damage (e.g., no deaths, 6 or less injured, no structural collapse, or no failure of communications, transportation, or utility systems). b.Light Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes isolated damage (e.g., 1 or more deaths, 6 or more injured, 1 or more structures suffering partial or complete collapse, or any failure of communications, transportation, or utility systems). c.Moderate Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes widespread damage (e.g., several deaths, several injuries, several structures suffering partial or complete collapse, or major failures of communication, transportation, or utility systems). d.Heavy Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes catastrophic damage (e.g., massive fatalities, massive injuries, massive structural collapse, or long-term failure of communication, transportation, or utility systems). City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 13 of 35 e. Aftershocks “aftershocks” are common and may last for days, weeks, or months intermittently. These aftershocks are less intense but can be as damaging as the primary shock wave due to weakened structures. Unified Command will provide leadership of an Earthquake Disaster with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. B. Hazardous Materials Hazardous materials are produced and used throughout the City of San Luis Obispo. As a result, an accident involving hazardous materials may occur. There are a variety of effects that may be caused by an uncontrolled release of hazardous materials. The effects on humans will be dependent on the type and amount of material released. In addition to the direct human threat, hazardous materials or runoff from fire control may cause pollution and create fire or explosion hazards in sewer systems or other waterway areas. The toxicity of hazardous materials varies and in some cases exposure to a small quantity of material may cause serious injury or death. Hazard Analysis 1. Situation Due to the major surface arteries that transverse the city, the threat of a Hazardous Materials incident is a possibility. 2. Potential Threats Hazardous materials incidents may occur at fixed facilities, along any air or land transportation route, and in unpredictable areas relatively inaccessible by ground transportation. The City has three (3) major transportation arteries, Highways 1, 101 and Highway 227 where hazardou s materials are transported through the City. Pesticides and chemicals are stored at numerous sites around the City. Air transportation of hazardous materials poses a small but still potential hazard. Hazardous waste is occasionally shipped along US 101 to a major dumpsite located in the Kettleman Hills near Interstate Highway 5. 3. Potential Range of Impacts The vast majority of Hazardous Materials events may have little or no impact. However, Hazardous Materials events that are severe in nature may result in impacts ranging from evacuation to serious injuries to citizens and first responders. The probability for a disastrous hazardous materials incident is low, the probability for extreme City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 14 of 35 risk to life and property is high should such a Disaster occur. Unified Command will provide leadership of a Hazardous Materials event with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. C. Multiple Casualty A Multiple Casualty Incident (MCI) is one which involves an enough injured persons to ov erwhelm the first responding medi cal resources. The incident may be a significant medical hazard to a large population (natural disaster, Hazardous Materials Incident, etc.), or involves evacuation of a medical facility (hospital, convalescent home, etc.). Hazard Analysis 1. Situation The potential exists for a Multiple Casualty Incident that could quickly overrun the capabilities of the City of San Luis Obispo’s fire department. 2. Potential Threats Surface Roadways Highways 1, 101 and 227 they are heavi ly traveled with trucks, private cars, and passenger buses. Air In addition to flights in and out of the San Luis County Regional Airport, The City of San Luis Obispo is flown over by commercial flights traveling the Los Angeles – San Francisco corridor as well as flying to other destinations and by military aircraft from bases such as Naval Air Station Lemoore and Vandenberg Air Force Base. Rail A derailment threat of tanker, dry railway frei ght, or passenger train always has the potential of a major impact to the city. 3. Potential Range of Impacts A Multi ple Casualty Incident that may co uld in considerable loss of life and property. The local Hospitals and Trauma Centers may become burdened with the surge in patients. This may cause the compromise in emergency medical care to the city. Unified Command will provide leadership of a Mass C asualty Incident with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 15 of 35 D. Transportation A transportation incident is one that involves m ultiple modes of transportation that may overwhelm the resources of the city. Hazard Analysis 1. Situation All motor vehicle incidents have the potential to result in injuries and fatalities to both passengers and the general population. 2. Potential Threats Su rface As the City’s population increases and traffic flow grows larger on freeways and roadways throughout the City, the possibility of transportation disasters may increase. Incidents on Highways 1, 101, an d 227 are major threats due to traffic congestion. Aircraft Many aircraft accidents are handled by appropriate public safety Disaster response agencies without the need for activation of, or support from, the City’s Disaster organization. However, there may be times when such support could be necessary, such an aircraft crashing within the city limits, causing disastrous damage. Assistance from outside agencies will be needed as well. The City of San Luis Obispo has a public airport south of and adjacent to the city limits. There is also a landing area for helicopters at Sierra Vista Hospital. Specialized aircraft firefighting resources are located at the airport. The City of San Luis Obispo is flown over by commercial flights traveling the Los Angeles – San Francisco corridor as well as flying to other destinations and by military aircraft from bases such as Naval Air Station Lemoore and Vandenberg Air Force Base. Railway An Amtrak passenger train or a tanker/freight derailment are very real possibilities. 3. Potential Impacts Transportation incidents may cause physical, financial, property damage and psychological impacts with citizens and First Responders. Unified Command will provide leadership to a Transportation Incident with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief provi ding guidance to the Unified Command Staff. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 16 of 35 E. Fire Wildland The areas that are at risk from a large scale wildland fire are, for the most part, located on the edge of the City limits. Bishops Peak, Irish Hills/Prefumo Canyon, Johnson Ranch and Poly Canyon. These Wildland Urban Intermix areas are where there is the most wildland urban intermix (the mixture of homes and wildland areas). These areas are also where the heaviest concentration of br ush a nd grass is found in the City. Structures in this Wil dl and Urban Intermix area are extre mely susceptible to wildland fires. The City of San Luis Ob ispo Fire Department has established and enforces a rigorous weed abatement program. Structure A structure fire in the city may involve residences, industrial and commercial buildings. Structures in the City vary in construction from ordinary, heavy timber or wood frame. Each variance in construction type presents a unique challenge for the fire department. Hazard Analysis 1. Situation The potential for a large-scale wildfire event or structure fire in the City will always exist. Prevention measures will minimize the impacts. 2. Potential Threats Wildland The potential for a major fire in the City of San Luis Obispo always exists. Residential, wil dland- urban intermix, industrial, and commercial areas, along with transportation fires are the primary areas of concern. The City of San Luis Obispo has a threat from a wildland fire. There are several areas in the community where homes and businesses are built closely together, providing difficult access and with very little defensible space. In addition, the construction of many of these buildings, often wood-frame with wood siding and combustible roofs, would offer significant fuel to a wind or topographically driven fire. Structure The City of San Luis Obispo has a limited number of older, buildings and many wood framed structures spread throughout the community. Typically, these buildings lack modern fire protection systems and given their construction type could pose challenges for the Fire Department. A si gnificant number of very large buildings can be found in the commercial and industrial areas of the City of San Luis Obispo. 3. Potential Range of Impacts Major structure fires and wildland-urban intermix fires may have a negative economic impact on the City of San Luis Obispo. It should be noted the City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the July 2019 Community Wildfire Protection City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 17 of 35 Plan as a blueprint to minimize Wildfire impacts to the City. Unified Command will provide leadership to a Wildland or major structure fire with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. F. Civil Disturbance –Terrorism—Active Shooter CIVIL DISTURBANCE Civil Disturbance is the spontaneous disruption of normal, orderly conduct and activities in urban, areas or outbreak of rioting or violence that is of a large nature is referred to as civil distur bance or disorder. Civil disorder is a demonstration of popular unrest that may manifest itself in acts of violence and destruction against property and human life. High-density event-oriented populations occur at various times throughout the year. They are events that attract large numbers of persons such as school events, parades, and Farmers Market. Hazard Analysis 1. Situation The threat to the public, law enforcement and safety personnel can be severe and bold. 2. Potential Threats Securing of essential facilities and services is necessary. Looting and fires can take place as a result of perceived or actual non-intervention by authorities. 2. Potential Impacts Damage possibilities range from the loss of life, multiple casualties, significant property damage from fire and looting, or the loss of infrastructure (electric and water systems). Looting and fires could take place in both commercial and residential areas of the City of San Luis Obispo. The setting of fires is a common occurrence in these types of events. Major structure fires or conflagrations are a real threat as fire suppression efforts will often be hindered TERRORISM FEMA definition of Terrorism: Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom. The effects of terrorist activities can vary significantly, depending on the type, severity, scope, and duration of the activity. Terrorist a ctivities may result in disruption of utility services, property damage, injuries and the loss of lives. The possibility of a terrorist action, which might have an impact on the City, cannot be discounted. Terrorist actions may include biological, chemical, incendiary, explosive, nuclear/radiological, or electronic (such as City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 18 of 35 sof tware system) attacks. Hazard Analysis 1. Situation The possibility of a terrorist event, while low in possibility, has the potential to cause several casualties and property damage. 2. Potential Threats The threat to law enforcement and safety personnel can be severe. Securing of essential facilities and services is necessary. Casualties may take place as a result of perceived or actual non- intervention by authorities. 3. Potential Impacts Impacts range from the loss of life and multiple casualties to significant property damage from fire and looting, or to the loss of infrastructure (electric and water systems) because of sabotage. ACTIVE SHOOTER The frequency of active shooter incidents has increased in recent years, and these incidents have affected numerous places where citizens congregate, such as schools, workplaces, places of worship, shopping malls, public meetings, and movie theaters. Active shooter situations are dynamic and quickly evolve. Hazard Analysis 1. Situation An active shooter as an individual or individuals actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a populated area. 2. Potential Threats Places where many people congregate are the greatest threat to an Active Shooter. There is no pattern or method to the selection of victims 3. Potential Impacts The effects of an Active Shooter incident may be but not limited to Injuries, death and the psychological impact of the event. Unified Command will provide leadership to a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter event with the Police Chief or designee providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 19 of 35 G. Diablo Canyon Power Plant The Diablo Canyon Diablo Canyon Power Plant is operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). The plant is in San Luis Obispo County approximately 12 miles southwest of the City of San Luis Obispo. The plant consists of two nuclear power generating units. Both units are operational. Each unit is a pressurized water-type reactor having an electric power generating capacity in excess of 1,000 megawatts. When any Nuclear Power Plant is operated, the potential for a radiological accident exists, though the probability of a serious accident is very low. The principal deterrent to an accident is prevention through conservative design, construction and operation, which assures that the integrity of the reactor system is maintained. Protective systems are installed and are automatically activated to counteract the resulting effects when any part of the reactor system fails. Disaster planning is necessary to assure public safety in the unlikely event that reactor safety systems fail. The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions, working in concert with State and Local Agencies, are responsible for the development of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant Disaster Response Plan. Protective actions are advised if it is necessary to avoid or reduce a projected dose of radiation. A projected dose is an estimate of the potential radiation dose to affected individuals. Generally, protective actions will be either evacuation or sheltering in place. Federal and State guidance advises protective actions for the Protective Action Zone (PAZ) that lies entirely within San Luis Obispo County. Protective actions for the City of San Luis Obispo are not anticipated during the plume phase of an incident. However, the City could be directly affected by protective actions taken in San Luis Obispo County including evacuation, and ingestion pathway exposure, covering food supplies, interdiction and decontamination. Unified Command will provide leadership to a Diablo Canyon Power Plant with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 20 of 35 H. Adverse Weather The City of San Luis Obispo is susceptible to the following Adverse Weather events in any given year: Hazard Analysis Drought Droughts have major impacts to the environment, agriculture, health and economics of the City. During these periods the City must be on the alert to impacts in the community and take the appropriate corrective measures. Erosion Erosion is a natural geological process caused by currents, storms, earthquakes, winds, and the gradual movement of tectonic plates. It may take place slowly over thousands of years, or it may occur dramatically, as with landslides or severe storms. Localized Flooding Floods are a natural occurrence along stream beds and creek areas as a result of torrential rains. Flash flooding can be caused by heavy localized rainfall, which can turn streets and creek beds into raging torrents of water capable of causing extensive damage and posing a danger to the public. The National Weather Service’s definition of a flash flood is a flood occurring in a watershed where the time of travel of the peak of flow from one end of the watershed to the other is less than six hours. Several creek drainage systems, including the San Luis Obispo Creek, Stenner Creek, Old Garden Creek, and Prefumo Creek flow into and/or through the City. San Lu is Obispo Creek is the largest and runs thr ough the downtown area and several residential areas. When rainfall and surface run-off from a storm exceeds a drainage system's capacity to adequately channel and contain the water, flooding may occur. Potential flood problem areas include: the downtown area adjacent to San Luis Obispo Creek; San Luis Obispo Creek at the Marsh Street/Higuera Street Bridge; US 101 and Los Osos Valley Road; Johnson Avenue railroad underpass; and areas adjacent to Laguna Lake. Other problems and hazards associated with flooding and inclement weather include utility disruptions, power lines down, trees down, and transportation route disruptions. Wind Storms: Refers to any dangerous meteorological phenomena with the potential to cause damage, serious social disruption, or loss of human life. Severe windstorms pose a significant risk to life and property in the region by creating conditions that disrupt essential systems such as public utilities, telecommunications, and transportation routes. High winds can and do occasionally cause tornado-like damage to local homes and businesses. Severe windstorms can present a very destabilizing effect on the dry brush that covers local hillsides and wildland urban intermix areas. In addition, high winds may have destructive impacts, especially to property trees, power lines, and other utility services. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 21 of 35 Severe Winter Storm: A Seve re Winter storms are a combination of High Winds and Heavy Rains. These events occur on a regula r basis when two fronts combine to create the storm. Storms present the possibility of erosion and localized flooding. Monitoring weather conditions is the appropriate action when they are forecast Severe Heat With the Mediterranean climate impacting the City severe heat events have been rare in nature. However recently the occurrence of a severe heat event has become much more prevalent. 1. Situation Adverse Weather events are of relatively short duration but nonetheless can create major recovery issues for the city. The risk of these events impacting San Luis Obispo is a concern as they occur on a frequent basis. 2. Potential Threats Adverse Weather events may place the City’s commercial district in jeopardy. Single Family and Multi-Family residential units will also be in jeopardy during an Adverse Weather event. 3. Range of Impacts Adverse Weather events may impact housing, commercial, infrastructure and Tourism. Unified Command will provide leadership in an Adverse We ather eve nt, with the Public Works Director or designee providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 22 of 35 SECTION IV - DISAS TER MANAGEMENT A. National Incident Management Systems (NIMS ) and Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) In a disaster, government response is an extraordinary extension of responsibility and action, coupled with the normal day-to-day activities associated with governing. Any disaster event of local consequence will more than likely overwhelm th e resour ces of San Luis Obispo, requiri ng assistance from a multitude of agencies, initially from area mutual aid partners, then from the State and in major events the Federal Governm ent. The Standardized Disa ster Manageme nt System (SEMS ) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) ha ve been adopted by the City of San Luis Obispo. These systems establish a state and nationwi de standard response structure and basic p rotocols to be used by all agencies in both Disaster response and recovery from a major event. Their authority and structure can be found in Title 21 of the California Code of Regulations the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the Homeland Security Presidential Directive #5, 2004. The intent of this system is a more coordinated effort of Disaster management, first at the local level, then at the San Luis Obispo County level, then the state level, and when it is warranted at the national level. B. Incident Command System (ICS) The Incident Command System (ICS) is a field-level Disaster management system that consists of several components. When applied together, the following provide the basis for effecti ve Disaster management: • Common ter minology • Modula r organization • Integrated communications • Unified command structure • Consolidated action plans • Manageable span of control • Comprehensiv e resource management The modular aspect of The Incident Command System (ICS) establishes a Disaster organi zation based on the resources needed to support all phases of a Disaster. The organization's staff wi ll be integrated from the top down. If a situation escalates, additional resources can be brought into the organization, and, likewise, when the situati on de -escalates, resources can be released when they are no longer needed. C. Department Operati ng Center (DOC) The Department Operating Cente r (DOC) staff coordinates with the EOC to support the overall City Disaster response and recovery activities. The DOC supports the EOC and is a condui t from the field to the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 23 of 35 NOTE: Tactical o n-scene response decisions are m ade at the field Incident Command level—NOT by members of the DOC staff. The following DOC’s support the EOC: • Fire DOC • Law Enforcement DOC • Public Works DOC • Utilities DOC • Community Development DOC D. City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Organization The Disaster Operations Organizational Chart, at the end of this section, illustrates the City of Sa n Luis Obispo's Incident Management Organi zation for various types of disasters. The staffing and actual structure of the organization will vary based on the type and severity of a Disaster. Table V lists City personnel that will be trained to fill the Disaster positions shown. Each position has an alternate. Some are cross trained to fill several positions. The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center is led by the Emergency Services Director. The Emergency Operations Center Director has overall responsibility for the City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Management. The City Manager is designated as the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director and is to provide policy guidance to the EOC. The highest ranking on-duty Fire Officer or Police Officer will act as the field Incident Commander at the onset of a Disaster. When the Emergency Operations Center is activated, the Emergency Services Director is supported by five functional groups. The functional Disaster Operatio ns Center groups are: • Command Staff • Operations Section • Planning/Intelligence Section • Logistics Section • Finance/Administration Section Except for Command, which includes the Emergency Services Director and support staff, each of these groups is headed by a Section Coordinator. The Section Coordinators comprise the General Staff that is the management core under the Disaster Operations Center Director. The Section C oordinators may activate functions as needed to support Section operations. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 24 of 35 E. Responsibilities This section outlines the general responsibilities of the functional Incident Management Organizati on groups. 1.Emergency Services Director The Emergency Services Director has res ponsibility for coordinating all the EOC operations. Depending on the type of Disaster, personnel authorized to act in the capacity of Disaster Operations Center Directo r are as follows: •City Manager •Assistant City Manager •Deputy city Manager •Fire Chief •Police Chief •City Clerk •Human Resources •Finance Director •Parks & Recr eation •Public Works Director •Designated Fire and Poli ce Personnel The Emergency Services Director responsibilities include: •Directing the Command Staff and General Staff. •Developing and implementing strategic decisions including prioritizing multiple nee ds for resource allocation. •Approving the order and release of resources. •Activating Incid ent C ommand Sy stem elements. •Ensuring planning meetings are conducted. •Approving and authorizing implementation of Incident Action Plans. •Determining information needs and informing the Command Staff. •Reviewing and authorizing the rel ease of information to the news medi a and public. •Ensuring the general welfare and safety of the Disaster Operations Center personnel. •Approving the Plan for demobilization and recov ery. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 25 of 35 2.F ield Incident Commander (IC) The Incident Commander (IC) has responsibility for co or dinating all fi eld Disaster Operations . The Incident Commander (IC) must work in close accord with the Emergency Operations Center Director. Depending on the type of Disaster, personnel authorized to act in the ca pacity of Incident Com mander (IC) are as follows: •Fire Chief •Police Chief •Public Works Director •Utilities •Designated Fire and Police Officers The Incident Commander’s (IC) responsibilities include: •Dire cting the operations in the field. •Developing and implementing strategic decisions. •Approvi ng the order and release of resources. •Activating Incident Command System elements. 3.Emergency Operations Center Safety and Security Officer/EWIC The Emergency Oper ations Center Safety and Security Officer is responsible for monitoring and assessing hazardous and unsafe situations and developing measures for assuring EOC personnel safety. The EOC Safety and Security Officer will make recommendations to the Emerg ency Services Director to correct unsafe acts or conditions. The Safety and Security Officer may provide input in the development of Incident Action Plans regarding safe operations conduct. Additional responsibility includes the EWIC Coordinator for Diablo C anyon related event. 4.Public Information Officer The Public Information Officer is responsible for formulating and releasing information about the Disaster to the news media and the general public. I n some situations, the Public Information Officer and Liaison Officer may be handled by one person. In large-scale Disaster situations, addi tional staff may be required for this function to operate effectively. The Public Information Officer/Liaison Officer’s Function responsibilities include: •Gathering and disseminating Disaster information. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 26 of 35 •Activ ating a Joint Information Center (JIC) at a location remote from the Emergency Operations Center. •Obtain approval for the release of information. •Coordinating the release of Disa ster information to the pu blic and news media wi th other agencies. •Responding to special requests for information. •Providing information about the Disaster to the Incident Management Organization. 5. Liaison Officer The Liaison Officer will be the primary contact for outside agencies. In large-scale Disas ter situations, additional staff may be required for this function to operate effectively. •Identifying contacts and communication links with outside agencies and organizations. •Providing information to and responding to requests from inter-agency and intra- agency contacts. 6.Policy Group Led by the Mayor, assi sted by the City Manager, City Council, City Clerk and City Attorney, this group will provide legal and long -range policy as the Disaster effects the overall operation of the City. Dire ction, from the Administration/Policy Group, to the Emergency Operati ons Center Director and to the field Incident Commanders must be updated on a regular basis. 7.Op erations Section This section is headed by the Operations Section Coordinator and is a member of the General staff. This secti on is responsible for the fol lowing operations: •Providing and coordinating law enforcement services, includi ng assisting other law enforcement agencies in traffic management. •Providing and coordinating public works services, including providing and placing barricades and signs for traffic management activities. •Providing and coordinating fire protection services. •Providing and coordinating emergency medical services for the City. •Establishing and managing staging areas. •Ensuri ng the general welfare and safety of section personnel. •Providing Care and Shelter for the City •Providing Evacuation direction for the City The Law Enforcement Branch, Fire and Rescue Branch, and Public Works Branch, are examples of functions that will operate under the direction of the Operations Section Coordi na tor. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 27 of 35 8. Plans and Intelligence Section This section is led by the Plans and Intelligence Section Coordinator and is a member of the General staff. The Section is responsible for obtaining, evaluating, disseminating and using information concerning the developing status of the Disaster. This information is needed to understand the current situation and develop appropriate courses of action to effectively manage the Disaster response. The Situation/Status Unit, Advance Plans Unit, GIS/Mapping Unit Documentation Unit, are examples of functions that will operate under the direction of the Plans and Intelligence Section Coordinator. 9. Logistics Section This section is led by the Logistics Section Coordinator and is a member of the General staff. The Logistics Section Coordinator, with assistance from several units, is responsible for providing logistical needs such as Facilities Unit, Communications/IT Uni t, Transportation Unit, Supply Procurement Unit, and Personnel Unit. The Logistic Section Coordinator is also responsible for ensuring the general welfare and safety of section personnel. The, Communications/IT Unit, Facilities Unit, and Supply Procurement Unit are examples of functions that will operate under the direction of the Logistics Section Coordinator. 10. Finance and Administration Section This section is led by the Finance and Administration Section Coordinator and is a member of the General staff; this section is responsible for all financial and cost aspects associated with the Disaster. The Finance and Administration Section Coordinator manages and is assisted by three units: The Time Unit, Cost Finance Unit, Compensation and Claims Unit. These are examples of functions that will be under the direction of the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 28 of 35 EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER POSITION ASSIGNMENTS The following section outlines position assignments for the Incident Leadership Organization members. The assignments are made corresponding to position within the regular City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Leadership Organization Chart by position only. Members of the City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Leadership Organization that are as appointed to the Emergency Operations Center shall be made aware of their assignment and offered special training for their incident management function. These assignments are recommendations only. Any person familiar with the Incident Command System may be used to fill positions that are deficient on personnel, especially in the early stages of an incident. EOC POSITION JOB TITLE Emergency Services Director City Manager Deputy Emergency Services Director Assistant City Manager Alternates: Deputy City Manager Public Information Officer Deputy City Manager Alternates: Assistant to the City Manager, Fire PIO Liaison Officer Admin Deputy Director Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Legal Officer City Attorney Alternates: Assistant City Attorney EOC Safety and Security Officer Police Representative Al ternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Operations Coordinator (Fire) Fire Chief Alternates: Deputy Fire Chief Operations Coordinator (Law Enforcement) Police Chief Alternates: Police Captain Operations Coordinator (Natural Disaster) Public Works Director Al ternates: Deputy Public Works Director Fire & Rescue Branch Leader Deputy Fire Chief Alternates: Battalion Chief Law Enforcement Branch Leader Police Captain Alternates: Police Lieutenant Care & Shelter Branch Leader Parks & Recreation Director Alternates: Recreation Manager Utilities Branch Leader Utilities Director Alternates: Deputy Utilities Director Public Works Branch Leader Public Works Director Alternates: Deputy Public Works Director Planning/Intelligence Coordinator Community Development Director Alternates: Building Code Official/Fire Marshal Situation/Status Unit Leader As appointed by Emergency Services Director Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 29 of 35 Advance Plans Unit Leader As appointed by Emergency Services Director Alternates: CDD or Fire Representative EOC POSITION JOB TITLE Documentation Unit Leader Fire Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Damage Assessment Community Development Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director GIS/Mapping Unit Leader GIS Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Resource Unit Leader As appointed by Emergency Services Director Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Tech Specialist As appointed by Emergency Services Director Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Logistics Coordinator Fire Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Communications/IT Unit Leader IT Manager Alternates: Network Service Supervisor Facilities Unit Leader Public Works Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Supply/Procurement Leader Finance Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Personnel Unit Leader Human Resources Director Alternates: Human Resources Manager Finance/Administration Coordinator Finance Director Alternate: As appointed by Emergency Services Director Time Unit Leader Finance Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Compensation/Claims Unit Leader Finance Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director Cost Accounting Unit Finance Representative Alternates: As appointed by Emergency Service Director City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 30 of 35 SECTION V - PROGRAM MAINTENANCE A. City of San Luis Obispo Municipal Code, Chapter 2 Administration and Personnel, Chapter 2.24 Emergency Services 2.24.030 Disaster Council--Membership The San Luis Obispo disaster council is created and shall consist of the following: A. The mayor, who shall be the chair of the disaster council. B. The vice mayor, who shall be vice chair. C. All other members of the city council. (Ord. 1560 § 2, 2011: prior code § 2430.1A) 2.24.040 Disaster Council –Power and Duties It shall be the duty of the disaster council, and it is empowered, to review and approve the emergency operations plan and mutual-aid plans and agreements and such ordinances and resolutions and rules and regulations as are necessary to implement such plans and agreements. The disaster council shall meet upon call of the emergency services director or, in his or her absence from the city or inability to call such meeting, upon call of the deputy emergency services director. (Ord. 1560 § 3, 2011: prior code § 2430.2) 2.24.070 Emergency Organization—Membership All officers and employees of this city, together with those volunteer forces enrolled to aid the emergency organization during an emergency, and all groups, organizations and persons who may by agreement or operation of law, including persons pressed into service under the provisions of Section 2.24.060(A)(6)(c), be charged with duties pertaining to the protection of life and property in this city during such emergency, shall constitute the emergency organization of the city. All above mentioned members of the emergency organization, without exception, will be considered disaster service workers giving them protection under California Senate Bill 39—Personal liability immunity: “disaster service workers” (State of California Civil Code Section 1714.5), or as that section subsequently may be amended. (Ord. 1560 § 6, 2011: prior code § 2430.5) B. Plan and Procedure Maintenance This Plan, in its entirety, will be reviewed, maintained, and updated on an annual basis by the Fire Chief or designee. The Plan Summary (Part 1) sets objectives and policy for the City and therefore ch anges require the approval of the City Council. The Hazard Specific Annexes (Part 2), Resource Directory (Part 3), the Recovery Directory and Plan (Part 4), Emergency Operations Center Position Checklists (Part 5) , Debris Management Plan (Part 6), and Continuati on of Operations and Reconstitution of Government (Part 7), are tactical and reference City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 31 of 35 documents containing information that changes frequently. As such they do not require City Council Approval. C. Disaster Resource Maintenance The Disaster Preparedness Committee shall direct City Departments to establish and maintain a Disaster Resources Directory (DRD) for the purposes of listing equipment, supplies, facilities, and communica tions systems for use in disaster situations. The Disaster Resource Directory shall contai n vendor contacts, their phone numbers, and general information. The Disaster Resource Directory is in City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Di saster Leadership Plan. D. Training It is the policy of the City of San Luis Obispo to sponsor and coordinate an annual exerci se on a component of the City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Management Plan. The Fire Department will develop and administer the drills or exercises. The primary purpose of these events will be to evaluate and improve the Disaster Response Plan that the event may be based on. The exercise or drill should be a no-fault training and learning ex perience to all its participants. All actions during the exercise will be observed and recorded by an evaluator group comprised of Disaster Leadership Subject Matter E xperts. A "no fault" discussion and critique will follow the exercise. This critique will afford department players and the evaluator group with an opportunity to jointly comment on perceived strengths, and what needs improve ments to the Disaster Response Plan exercised. A closed evaluator group meeting will follow the critique for the purpose of recording on a consensus basis specific recommendation for Plan improvement. These recommendations will then be presented to the San Luis Obispo Fire Chief within 30 days after the a ctual exercise. The Fire Department will also assist individual departments in developing training progra ms specifi c to both individuals and any position he or she m ay hold within the City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Management Organization. The Fire Departme nt will also be responsible for providing general training to the City Council and the employees as needs ari se. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 32 of 35 E. Revision Page This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, revision title, page number revised date the revision was posted and the name of the person posting the revision. The format for numbering revisions shall be a sequential number followed by the last two digits of the current calendar year (e.g., #1-15, #2-15, and so on). New sequential revision numbers will begin each January 1. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 33 of 35 SECTION VII - AUTHORITIES AND REFERENCES A. Authorities The following provides Disaster authorities for conducting and/or supporting Disaster operations: 1. Federal • Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Disaster Assistance • Federal Disaster Relief Act • Federal Civil Defense Act 2. State • SEMS Regulations California Co de of Regu lations (SEMS Guidelines). • California Disaster Services Act • California Disaster Plan • California Disaster Assistance Act • State Toxic Disaster Contingency Plan. • California Health and Safety Code, (Division 20, Chapter 6.5, Sections 25115 (defines “Extremely Hazardous Waste”) and 25117 (defines “Hazardous Waste”), Chapter 6.95, Section s 25500 et seq. (Business and Area Plans relating to the handling and releas e or threatened release of hazardous material), (Section 114705 et seq., dealing with Control of Radioactive Contamination of the Environment). • Orders and Regulations, which may be Selectively Prom ulgated by the Governor during a State of Disaster • Orders and Regulations Promulgated by the Governor to Take Effect upon the Existence of a State of War Disaster • California Master Mutual Aid Agreement 3. Local • City of San Luis Obispo Municipal Code Ti tle 2 Admini stration and Personnel, Chapter 2.24 Emergency Services • San Luis Obispo County Code - Disaster Organization and Functions B. References • California Disaster Plan • California Disaster Resources Management Plan • California Fire and Rescue Operations Plan • California Law Enforcement Mutual Aid Plan City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 34 of 35 • California Master Mutual Aid Agreement • California Disaster Medical Services Authority Multi- Causality Incident Guidelines • City of San Luis Obispo, Fire Department Policies and Procedu res Manual. • City of San Luis Obispo, Multi-hazard Disaster Response Plan, Date • FIRESCOPE Field Operations Guide - ICS 420-1 • San Luis Obispo County Disaster Operations Plan • San Luis Obispo County Earthquake Disaster Response Plan, San Luis Obispo County Office of Disaster Services • San Luis Obispo County Hazardous Materials Disaster Response Plan, San Luis Obispo County OES, • San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Disaster Response Plan • FEMA Developing and Maintaining Disaster Operations Plan, Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101, Version 2.0 • San Luis Obispo County Tsunami Response Plan • San Luis Obispo County Disaster Response Plan • San Luis Obispo Unified School District, Comprehensive Disaster Management Plan City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Plan Summary For Official Use Only 35 of 35 Emergency Operations Center Emergency Services Director City Manager Liaison Officer Public Information Officer Fire and Rescue Branch Law Enforcement Branch Care and Shelter Branch Public Works Branch Utilities Branch Planning/Intel Section Situation/Status Unit Resource Unit Documentation Unit GIS/Mapping Unit Logistics Section Communications/ IT Unit Transportation Unit Facilities Unit Supply Procurement Personnel Unit Finance/Admn Section Time Unit Comp/Claims Unit Cost Accounting Emergency Operations Center Safety and Security Officer EWEC Operations Section Policy Group Mayor City Council City Clerk City Attorney Deputy Emergency Services Director Damage Assessment Tech/Specialist City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan EARTHQUAKE ANNEX A Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Prepared by: David L. Mathe Disaster Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 2 of 18 FORWARD Annex A, City of San Luis Obispo Earthquake Emergency Management Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to an earthquake. Response measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if a major earthquake impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be responsible for coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standardized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the emergency organization and the emergency management system for response to a damaging earthquake impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of an earthquake, the Fire Chief will assume the position of Unified Incident Commander. In the event the Fire Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alternates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo's position as Incident Commander. No. 1 – Deputy Fire Chief or the on Duty Ba ttalion Chief No. 2 – The On-Duty Police/Fire Officer as appointed by the Fire or Police Chief No. 3 – The On-Duty highest ranking Fire Officer or Police Officer The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority during an emergency. _________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief San Luis Obispo Fire Department Date: City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 3 of 18 Earthquake Table of Contents Section Page Forward 2 Table of Contents 3 I. Essentials 5 A. Earthquake Advisory 5 B. Initiating Event 6 C. Earthquake Plan Activation 6 D. Initial Alerting 6 II. Response 7 A. Emergency Operations Center Locations 7 B. Emergency Operations Center-Levels of Activation 7 C. Emergency Response Levels 8 D. Situation Awareness Reporting 8 E. Situation Reporting Zones 9 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities 10 G. San Luis Obispo County Resources 10 III. Hazard Assessment 11 A. Hazard Assessment 11 IV. Potential Impacts 12 1. Leadership 12 2. Situation Reporting 13 3. Building Collapse/Rescue 13 4. Multiple Casualties 13 5. School Disruptions 13 6. Hazardous Materials release 13 7. Fires 13 8. Evacuation 14 9. Utilities—Natural Gas—Electric—Water—Sanitation 14 10. Transportation System 14 11. Communications 14 12. Emergency Public Information 15 13. Security 15 14. Volunteer Support 15 15. Donation Management 15 16. Care and Shelter 15 City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 4 of 18 V. Emergency Recovery 16 A. Re-entry 16 B. Demobilization 16 C. Final Report and Activity Log 16 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption 17 B. Purpose 17 C. Authorities 17 D. Scope 17 E. Plan Revisions 18 City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 5 of 18 I. Essentials A. Earthquake Advisory Advisories are not formal predictions but are issued following earthquakes in which there is concern about subsequent damaging earthquakes. They are statements by CalOES regarding scientific assessments, usually 3 – 5 days, that there is a likelihood for damaging earthquakes to occur in areas designated in the advisory. The basis for advisories is existing knowledge of the seismic history and potential of the area under consideration. Glossary of Prediction Terminology:  Long-Term Earthquake Potential No specific time periods. May refer to decades, centuries or millennia.  Long-Term Prediction A prediction of an earthquake that is expected to occur within a few years up to a few decades.  Intermediate-Term Prediction A prediction of an earthquake that is expected to occur within a period of a few weeks to a few years.  Short-Term Prediction A prediction of an earthquake that is expected to occur within a few hours to a few weeks. The short-term prediction can be divided as follows: o Imminent Alert – Up to three days. o Alert – Three days to a few weeks.  Probability The following terms and percentages are suggested: General Predictions Parkfield Slight – 10% or less Level C – 2.8% to 11% Moderate – 11% to 49% Level B – 11% to 37% High – 50% to 100% Level A – 37% or more City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 6 of 18 B. Initiating Event The earthquake is the initiating event that alerts the public and the City of San Luis Obispo. The focal point for reporting initial earthquake damage is the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Communications Center. C. Earthquake Plan Activation It is the policy of the City of San Luis Obispo that an earthquake, as referenced in this Plan, and in the judgment of the City Manager, Fire Chief or Police Chief, or their designee, warrants activation of this plan. If confirmed damage is brought to the attention of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center, contact with the Unified Incident Commander (or authorized alternate) should be attempted. If contact is possible, the Unified Incident Commander or alternate would be advised of the situation, including initial damage reports. Additionally, if contact with the Unified Incident Commander or any authorized alternate cannot be made, the on-duty Fire Officer or highest-ranking Police Officer may recommend Plan activation. Unified Command will provide leadership of an Earthquake Disaster with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. D. Initial Alerting Upon Plan activation, the San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center will notify City departments of Plan and Emergency Operations Center activation. EOC mobilization instructions are as follows:  The on-duty dispatchers (with the assistance of on-duty support staff) will: Notify the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Alert all off-duty police, fire and public works personnel and have them report to assigned work areas. Poll police and fire units and stations for damage assessment and available resources. Alert on-duty police and fire units and instruct them to begin Situation Reporting in the San Luis Obispo Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ). City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 7 of 18 II. Response A. Emergency Operations Center Locations: The following are the EOC locations for an emergency event. (Note: These locations may be adjusted or changed depending on the specific circumstances of the event). EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) Primary: San Luis Obispo City Fire Department 2160 Santa Barbara Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Secondary: Ludwick Community Center 864 Santa Rosa Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 B. Emergency Operations Center – Levels of Activation The number of City staff at the EOC will depend on the level of activation. The person authorizing the activation of the EOC will determine the Level of Activation. The Emergency Services Director or Deputy Emergency Services Director may change the activation level throughout the emergency as needed. The levels of activation are: EOC LEVEL 1 A major disaster wherein local resources are overwhelmed. State and/or federal resources are required. A local emergency and a state of emergency will be proclaimed. A Presidential Declaration of Emergency or major disaster will be requested. The EOC will be staffed to the highest number of personnel possible or necessary. EOC LEVEL 2 A moderate to severe emergency wherein local resources are not adequate and mutual aid may be required on a regional or even statewide basis. A local emergency and a state of emergency may be proclaimed. The EOC will be moderately staffed. EOC LEVEL 3 A minor to moderate incident wherein local resources are adequate and available. A local emergency may or may not be declared. The EOC will be minimally staffed. Note: Upon activation of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Operations Center, contact will be established with the County of San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 8 of 18 C. Emergency Response Levels Levels of response may vary due to differing perceptions of the incident by response personnel, based on their experience, training, capability, and the local response policy. In addition, the characteristics of the material, the nature of its release, and the vulnerability of the receptors (i.e., populations, ecosystems) may also influence the level of response. Emergency response for earthquake emergencies is broken down into three levels: Level 1, Severe Emergency: Total recall of all off-duty police, fire department personnel, and request the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Level 2, Escalating Emergency: Increased number of incidents due to a damaging earthquake. On-duty crews cannot keep up with calls. The incident can be handled by calling out all off-duty public works department employees and with the assistance of on-duty fire and police units. Level 3, Non-Emergency: Always in effect day-to-day routine operations. No excessive incident loads. On-duty crews can handle all calls. D. Situation-Awareness Reporting 1. General The priority upon plan activation is situation reporting: the process of getting a complete and comprehensive picture of the damages caused by the event. Immediately after a damaging earthquake, situation reporting may be minimal. It is recognized that complete damage intelligence may take several hours to several days to get a complete and stable citywide assessment. Continuing situation reporting is critically important and is the foundation on which EOC/field actions are based. Every effort must be made to immediately initiate a field survey within a Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ) and to gather the best available information, and report that information through channels to the City of San Luis Obispo EOC as soon as possible. Situation Reports may become available from the other sources, i.e.:  General Public  News and Social Media  San Luis Obispo County Emergency Communications Center  San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services  City of San Luis Obispo Radio equipped field units  Caltrans  California Highway Patrol  SEMPRA (formerly known as Southern California Gas Company)  San Luis Coastal Unified School District  Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 9 of 18 Area Medical Centers The individual field Situation Reporting Groups within the Operations Section will conduct a field survey of an area or Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ). Early reports may include the following: Rescue needs (estimated number trapped) Serious mass injuries (estimated number) Deceased (estimated number) Damaging earthquake Serious hazardous material spills Any other critical emergency or situation observed E.Situation-Reporting Zones In the event of a damaging major event, the City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into four Situation-Reporting Zones (SRZ's). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no damage occurs within an SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 10 of 18 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY Police Department Citywide primary survey for all damages Fire Department Citywide survey for damage, rescue, injuries and fire Public Works Citywide survey for streets, facilities and, parks damage Survey for water, wastewater, electric, broadband and solid waste damages Information Technology Citywide survey for communication damage Community Development Citywide survey of critical facilities for adverse weather- related damage, structural damage, and posting of unsafe buildings Utilities Citywide survey of freshwater and waste disposal systems PG & E Utilities Survey for condition of their transmission lines San Luis Coastal Unified School District Survey for condition of their facility and personnel Caltrans Jurisdictional survey for State highways G. San Luis Obispo County Resources The Office of Emergency Services (OE S) coordinates all requests for assistance for San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at 805.781.1144. The American Red Cross works together with the Care and Shelter Branch to identify and establish evacuation and general population shelter sites. In most cases the Care and Shelter Branch provides a supporting role to the American Red Cross. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 11 of 18 III. Hazard Assessment The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identification and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. General Responsibilities Listed below is a general assessment that may result from a damaging earthquake. The exact circumstances of an earthquake event may dictate some flexibility and adjustments. A. Hazard Assessment 1. Situations Earthquakes are a threat to the City of San Luis Obispo due to several fault zones in the vicinity. 2. Potential Threats – Fault Systems There are several active or potentially active fault systems throughout the region. Small earthquakes, in the range of about magnitude 2.0 – 2.7 and smaller, occur occasionally throughout and near San Luis Obispo. Even though the City of San Luis Obispo is considered distant from the San Andreas Fault, the city and region remains at risk should there be a significant incident along the fault. 3. Potential Range of Damage Most earthquakes cause little or no damage. Earthquakes of 6.5 magnitude or greater (generally considered moderate to heavy damage earthquakes) occur within the state on an average of once every four years. For the purpose of this Plan, earthquakes will be divided into four categories as follows: a. Heavy Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes catastrophic damage (e.g., massive fatalities, massive injuries, massive structural collapse, or long-term failure of communication, transportation, or utility systems). b. Moderate Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes widespread damage (e.g., several deaths, several injuries, several structures suffering partial or complete collapse, or major failures of communication, transportation, or utility systems). c. Light Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes isolated damage (e.g., 1 or more deaths, 6 or more injured, 1 or more structures suffering partial or complete collapse, or any failure of communications, transportation, or utility systems). d. No Damage Earthquake – Ground motion causes no damage (e.g., no deaths, 6 or less injured, no structural collapse, or no failure of communications, transportation, or utility systems). City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 12 of 18 e. Aftershocks “aftershocks” are common and may last for days, weeks, or months intermittently. These aftershocks are less intense but can be as damaging as the primary shock wave due to weakened structures. IV. Potential Impacts This Section does not presume to predict the full range and depth of earthquake impacts. The following, attempts to present the most likely impacts from an earthquake occurring in or near the City of San Luis Obispo: 1. Leadership 2. Situation reporting 3. Building collapse causing need for rescue 4. Multiple Casualties 5. School disruptions 6. Hazardous material releases 7. Fires 8. Evacuation 9. Utilities – Natural Gas, Electricity and Sanitation 10. Transportation systems 11. Communications 12. Emergency Public Information 13. Security 14. Volunteer Support 15. Donation Management 16. Care and Shelter . 1. Leadership:  The strain on local government and its emergency response organization to command and coordinate the response to an earthquake could be immediate, severe, and overwhelming.  Initial out-of-county assistance will probably not occur within the first 24 hours.  Full assistance from out of county departments may not arrive until well after the first 72 hours. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 13 of 18  San Luis Obispo must presume that they will essentially be on their own, with only local surviving resources, for 72 hours.  It is estimated that full mobilization of local government personnel will be difficult due to internal casualties, transportation disruptions, and family status concerns. 2. Situation Reporting:  An overall assessment and prioritization of emergencies/hazards through a centralized means of situation reporting will be one of the first critical actions.  On-duty radio-equipped public safety and public services units may be the only means available to provide an initial survey of field areas and report damage information to the Emergency Operations Center.  Due to several factors (massive damage, limited personnel, transportation disruptions, communications overload, etc.), a complete situation reporting picture may take several hours to several days. 3. Building Collapse/Rescue:  The structures that will most commonly receive damage and fail in earthquakes are of unreinforced masonry construction.  The collapse of such buildings is often responsible for many casualties and the need for rescue. 4. Multiple Casualties  See Annex C, Multiple Casualty Incident of this Plan for additional information. 5. School Disruptions:  Should school be in session during a major earthquake, some serious injuries of students and faculty can be anticipated.  Schools would be immediately disrupted requiring them to either close or evacuate. 6. Hazardous Materials Releases:  Refer to Annex B, Hazardous Materials Annex for additional information. 7. Fires:  Refer to Annex E, Fire Annex for additional information . City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 14 of 18 8. Evacuation:  Evacuation that may be required because of an earthquake will be a high priority. 9. Utilities: Natural Gas, Electricity, Water, Sanitation  Normal utility systems may fail or be disrupted.  Electrical power loss would primarily be from breakage of overhead wires.  Water line breakage should be expected.  Localized damage to pump stations and storage facilities is anticipated.  Water System contamination may occur.  The city wastewater and water treatment plants may be damaged. 10. Transportation Systems:  An earthquake could disrupt normal transportation systems.  The primary cause of surface transportation failure would be from road deformation, landslides, and the loss of bridges.  Surface street blockage by debris would also cause delays and temporary road closures. 11. Communications:  Normal means for reporting emergencies/hazards via a 911 phone dependent system may be lost to the general public.  An earthquake may disable the telephone system.  Telephone equipment, both hard wired and cell sites, could be adversely affected primarily by overloading and physical damage.  Essential service lines will most likely survive and can typically primarily be relied upon in implementing this Plan.  Effective radio communications may require the augmentation of ARES personnel and/or the use of "car to car" relay systems. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 15 of 18  In the absence of emergency power to some agency base stations, portable radios may be the only available means of radio communications. 12. Emergency Public Information: Following an Earthquake, the public will need basic emergency public information. This information will be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo's Public Information Officer via: Emergency Broadcast Messages over the Emergency Alerting System (EAS) Social Media AM/FM Radio Stations Local network television 13. Security:  Looting may be anticipated.  Security to control access into and out of the most highly damaged areas will be a consideration for law enforcement departments. 14. Volunteer Support  The Local Chapter of the American Red Cross may aid in receiving, registering and organizing offers for volunteer assistance and shelters. 15. Donation Management  The local Salvation Army and/or Faith Based Organization may aid in receiving, inventorying and distributing volunteer donations of food, clothing, water, etc. 16. Care and Shelter  Some displaced persons may be self-sufficient in nature. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 16 of 18 V. Emergency Recovery The City of San Luis Obispo has a Recovery Plan and is a critical component of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. The following points are a short overview of items covered in more detail in that document. A. Re-Entry During transition into a recovery phase, areas affected by the earthquake should be inspected to determine if they are safe for public re-entry. Based on joint concurrence by the Unified Command Staff, state or federal representatives, re-entry will be authorized, and a Public Information message to that effect will be issued. B. Demobilization When response departments are nearing completion of the last remaining life-safety Protective Action Missions, and when the Emergency Services Director (San Luis Obispo City Manager) or the Deputy Emergency Services Director(Assistant City Manager) determines that the disaster has entered into a recovery phase, the command staff should develop a formal demobilization plan. Consideration should also be given to assigning appropriate departments to conduct short term recovery operations (e.g., debris removal, restoration of critical facilities, utilities and communications, and tending to the needs of the displaced, etc.) The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center should be downgraded as an Emergency Operations Center. The Emergency Operations Center will then become a Recovery Operations Center (ROC). It is desirable to attempt to restore departments to their normal working routine and environment as soon as possible. The Unified Command Staff, as well as other City of San Luis Obispo departments, will be heavily involved in short and long-term recovery operations. C. Final Report and Activity Log All department heads from the City of San Luis Obispo departments involved in the Earthquake response will be required to complete a narrative report and a master activity log. The narrative report briefly describes the primary responsibility, the protective action missions performed and the total staff hours of involvement by the agency during the emergency phase of the earthquake. The master activity log documents names and times of agency personnel involved in a mission, equipment and supplies used, and any contracts with a private vendor to support emergency operations. Most of this information can be extrapolated from individual activity logs used by team leaders during the emergency (ICS 214, EOC messages, EOC activity logs). A copy of the narrative report and activity logs should be forwarded to the Plans Section as soon as possible and will be part of the official record of the earthquake disaster. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 17 of 18 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption This is the official San Luis Obispo City Plan for responding to an earthquake occurring in, or threatening, the City of San Luis Obispo. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below. B. Purpose The purpose of this Plan is to establish the City of San Luis Obispo's response organization, command authority, responsibilities, functions and interactions required to mitigate the effects of an earthquake affecting the City of San Luis Obispo. The priority of emergency response to a damaging event shall be to minimize loss of life and property. The Plan is designed to unify all response departments under the Incident Command System (ICS) in order to best utilize joint resources and more effectively minimize damage to life and property caused by the effects of an earthquake. C. Authorities See the Plan Summary for a listing of all authorities and references. D. Scope 1. Relationship with Other Plans This Plan, a component of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan and is primarily intended to serve as a stand-alone Earthquake Response Plan. Procedures within this Plan address emergency response and short-term recovery. The City of San Luis Obispo Earthquake Plan is compatible with federal, county and state emergency response plans. Should this type of event come about as the result of another disaster, that Disaster Plan will supersede this Plan. 2. Jurisdictional Factors This plan encompasses the City of San Luis Obispo jurisdictional limits of the City of San Luis Obispo. Copies of this Plan have been sent to the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services, incorporated cities, San Luis Coastal Unified School District, and locally based federal, state and military institutions for informational and coordination purposes. City of San Luis Obispo Annex A Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Earthquake ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 18 of 18 E. Revision Page This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, revision title, page number revised date the revision was posted and the name of the person posting the revision. The format for numbering revisions shall be a sequential number followed by the last two digits of the current calendar year (e.g., #1-15, #2-15, and so on). New sequential numbers will begin each January 1. Revision # Revision Title Page Number Revised Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Annex B Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Developed by: David L. Mathe Disaster Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 2 of 16 FORWARD Annex B, City of San Luis Obispo Hazardous Materials Response Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to a Hazardous Materials event. Preparedness measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if a Hazardous Materials event impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be responsible for coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standardized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the emergency organization and the emergency management system for response to a damaging Hazardous Materials impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of a Hazardous Materials Incident, the Fire Chief will assume the position of Unified Incident Commander. In the event the Fire Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alternates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo's position as Incident Commander. No. 1 – The Deputy Chief or On-Duty Battalion Chief No. 2 – The On-Duty Police/Fire Person as appointed by the Fire or Police Chief No. 3 – The On-Duty highest ranking Fire Officer or Police Officer The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority during an emergency. _____________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief San Luis Obispo Fire Department Date: City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 3 of 16 Hazardous Materials Table of Contents Section Page Forward 2 Table of Contents 3 I. Essentials 5 A. Hazardous Materials Definition 5 B. Initiating Event 5 C. Hazardous Materials Plan Activation 5 D. Initial Alerting 5 II. Response 6 A. Emergency Operations Center Locations 6 B. Emergency Operations Center-Levels of Activation 6 C. Emergency Response Levels 6 D. Situation Awareness Reporting 7 E. Situation Reporting Zones 8 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities 8 G. San Luis Obispo County Resources 8 III. Hazardous Assessment 9 A. Hazard Assessment 9 IV. Potential Impacts 10 1. Leadership 10 2. Situation Reporting 10 3. Evacuation 10 4. Shelter in Place 11 5. School Disruptions 12 6. Fires 12 7. Multiple Casualties 12 8. Utilities—Natural Gas—Electric—Water—Sanitation 12 9. Transportation System 12 10. Communication Disruptions 12 11. Emergency Public Information 13 V Recovery 14 A. Re-entry 14 B. Demobilization 14 C. Final Report and Activity Log 14 VI. Plan Administration 15 A. Plan Adoption 15 B. Purpose 15 C. Authority City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 4 of 16 VI. Plan Administration (continued) D. Scope 15 E. Plan Revisions 16 City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 5 of 16 I. Essentials A. Hazardous Materials Definition Any substance or combination of substances, which because of quantity, concentration, or characteristics may cause or significantly contribute to an increase in death or serious injury or pose substantial hazards to humans and/or the environment. B. Initiating Event The hazardous materials event is the initiating event that alerts the public and the City of San Luis Obispo. The focal point for reporting initial hazardous materials impact is the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Communications Center. C. Hazard Materials Plan Activation Any Hazardous Materials event that in the opinion of the San Luis Obispo City Manager, Fire Chief (or designee), Police Chief (or designee) that warrants the activation of this Plan. If confirmed impacts are brought to the attention of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center, contact with the Unified Incident Commander (or authorized alternate) should be attempted. If contact by phone is possible, the Unified Incident Commander or alternate would be advised of the situation (including initial damage reports) by the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center. Additionally, if contact with the Unified Incident Commander or any authorized alternate cannot be made, the on-duty Fire Officer or highest-ranking Police Officer may recommend Plan activation. D. Initial Alerting Upon Plan activation, the San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications will notify City departments of Plan and Emergency Operations Center activation, and to instruct them to mobilize should be made as follows: The on-duty dispatchers (with the assistance of on-duty support staff) will: Notify the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Alert all off-duty police, fire and public works personnel and have them report to assigned work areas. Poll police and fire units and stations for damage assessment and available resources. Alert on-duty police and fire units and instruct them to begin Situation Reporting in the Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ). City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 6 of 16 II. Response A. Emergency Operations Center Locations: The following are the EOC locations for an emergency event. (Note: These locations may be adjusted or changed depending on the specific circumstances of event). EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) Primary: San Luis Obispo City Fire Department 2160 Santa Barbara Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Secondary: Ludwick Community Center 864 Santa Rosa Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 B. Emergency Operations Center – Levels of Activation The number of City staff at the EOC will depend on the level of activation. The person authorizing the activation of the EOC will determine the Level of Activation. The Emergency Services Director or Deputy Emergency Services Director may change the activation level throughout the emergency as needed. The levels of activation are: EOC LEVEL 1 A major disaster where local resources are overwhelmed. State and/or federal resources are required. A local emergency and a state of emergency will be proclaimed. A Presidential Declaration of Emergency or major disaster will be requested. The EOC will be staffed to the highest number of personnel possible or necessary. EOC LEVEL 2 A moderate to severe emergency wherein local resources are not adequate and mutual aid may be required on a regional or even statewide basis. A local emergency and a state of emergency may be proclaimed. The EOC will be moderately staffed. EOC LEVEL 3 A minor to moderate incident wherein local resources are adequate and available. A local emergency may or may not be declared. The EOC will be minimally staffed. C. Emergency Response Levels Levels of response may vary due to differing perceptions of the incident by response personnel, based on their experience, training, capability, and the local response policy. In addition, the characteristics of the material, the nature of its release, and the vulnerability of the receptors (i.e., populations, ecosystems) may also influence the level of response. Emergency planning for a Hazardous Materials event is broken down into three levels: City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 7 of 16 Level 1, Severe Emergency: Total recall of all off-duty police, fire department personnel, and request the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Level 2, Escalating Emergency: Increased number of incidents due to a Hazardous Materials event. On-duty crews cannot keep up with calls; however, the incident can be handled by calling out all off-duty Fire Department employees and with the assistance on-duty fire and police units. Level 3. Non-Emergency: Always in effect day-to-day routine operations. No excessive incident load. On-duty crews can handle all calls. D. Situation Awareness Reporting 1. General The priority upon Plan activation is situation reporting: the process of getting a complete and comprehensive picture of the damages caused by the event. Immediately after a damaging earthquake, situation reporting may be minimal. It is recognized that complete damage intelligence may take several hours to several days to get a complete and stable citywide assessment. Continuing situation reporting is critically important and is the foundation on which EOC/fi eld actions are based. Every effort must be made to immediately initiate a field survey within a Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ) and to gather the best available information, and report that information through channels to the City of San Luis Obispo EOC as soon as possible. Situation Reports may become available from the other sources, i.e.: General Public News and Social Media San Luis Obispo County Emergency Communications Center San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services City of San Luis Obispo Radio equipped field units Caltrans California Highway Patrol SEMPRA (formerly known as Southern California Gas Company) San Luis Coastal Unified School District Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) Area medical centers City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 8 of 16 The individual field Situation Reporting Groups within the Operations Section will conduct a field survey of an area or Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ). Early reports may include the following: Rescue needs (estimated number trapped) Serious mass injuries (estimated number) Deceased (estimated number) Damaging earthquake Serious hazardous material spills Any other critical emergency or situation observed E. Situation Reporting Zones In the event of a damaging event, the City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into seven Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ’s). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no damage occurs within an SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. F. Situation Zone Responsibilities DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY Police Department Citywide primary survey for all damages Fire Department Citywide survey for damage, rescue, injuries and fire Public Works Citywide survey for streets, facilities and, parks damage Survey for water, wastewater, electric, broadband and solid waste damages Information Technology Citywide survey for communication damage Community Development Citywide survey of critical facilities for adverse weather related damage, structural damage, and posting of unsafe buildings Utilities Citywide survey of freshwater and waste disposal systems City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 9 of 16 PG & E Utilities Survey for condition of their transmission lines San Luis Coastal Unified School District Survey for condition of their facility and personnel Caltrans Jurisdictional survey for State highways G. San Luis Obispo County Resources The Office of Emergency Services (OES) coordinates all requests for assistance from San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at 805.781.1144. The American Red Cross works together with the Care and Shelter Branch to identify and establish evacuation and general population shelter sites. In most cases the Care and Shelter Branch provides a supporting role to the American Red Cross. III. Hazard Assessment The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identification and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. Department Responsibilities Listed below are the potential emergencies or problems resulting from a damaging Hazardous Materials event. The exact circumstances of the event may dictate some flexibility and adjustments. A. Hazard Assessment 1. Potential Threats The increasing volume and variety of Hazardous Materials that are generated, stored, or transported within City of San Luis Obispo is a concern to public officials and the community. A Hazardous Materials Event may impact the health and safety the citizens of San Luis Obispo. Several agriculture firms use potentially Hazardous Materials. Also, Incidents may occur at other fixed facilities where, the occupants have filed site-specific emergency response and evacuation plans. Underground pipelines carry flammable and hazardous liquids. There are a variety of effects that may be caused by an uncontrolled release of hazardous materials. The effects on humans depend on the type and amount of material released, however they may include: hazards that may be fatal if inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through skin; some hazardous materials may cause burns to skin and eyes upon contact; material that catches on fire may produce irritating or poisonous gases; some materials may cause dizziness or suffocation. In addition to the direct human threat, hazardous materials or runoff from fire control may cause pollution and create fire or explosion hazards in sewer systems or other waterway areas. Transportation Emergencies This plan covers hazardous material emergencies associated with transportation by highways, roads, surface streets, railroad, pipeline, or other means. City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 10 of 16 Fixed Installation Emergencies This plan covers hazardous materials emergencies occurring within any fixed installation storing, manufacturing, processing, utilizing, or disposing of hazardous materials. 2. Potential Range of Impacts The vast majority of Hazardous Materials events may have little or no impact. However, Hazardous Materials events that are severe in nature may result in impacts ranging from evacuation to serious injuries to citizens and first responders. EXCEPTION: This plan does not cover radiological emergencies resulting from direct operation of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. Radiological emergencies resulting from the operation of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant are covered by the San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan. IV. Potential Impacts This Section does not presume to predict the full range and depth of Hazardous Materials impacts. The following attempts to present the most likely impacts from a Hazardous Materials event occurring in or near the City of San Luis Obispo: 1. Leadership 2. Situation reporting 3. Evacuation 4. Shelter in Place 5. School disruptions 6. Fires 7. Multiple Casualties 8. Utilities – Natural Gas, Electricity and Sanitation 9. Transportation systems 10. Communication Disruptions 11. Emergency Public Information These emergencies are discussed in detail below as a basis for planning and response to a Hazardous Materials event. This Plan does not presume to predict the full range and depth of Hazardous Materials event consequences. It does, however, attempt to reflect the most accurate estimate of the nature of emergencies resulting from a Hazardous Materials event occurring in, or threatening the City of San Luis Obispo. Any concerns or comments should be directed to the fire department for consideration. 1. Leadership The strain on local government and its emergency response organization to command and coordinate the response to an extreme Hazardous Materials event could be immediate, severe, and overwhelming. City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 11 of 16 Out-of-county assistance from state, federal, mutual aid and private agencies will probably not be needed in anything but the most extreme situations. 2. Situation Reporting A Hazardous Materials event may initiate many types of emergencies and damages simultaneously over a widespread area. This will overwhelm emergency resources and preclude the traditional direct response to each emergency. Normal means for reporting emergencies via a 911-phone dependent system will probably be not lost to the general public. 3. Evacuation The purpose of evacuation is to move the population in an affected area away from the possible hazard. It is a protective action taken to avoid or reduce the public's exposure to hazardous materials. Evacuation of the public may be indicated when there are: Leaks involving unknown gases from large capacity storage containers. Explosives or large quantities of materials which could detonate or explode, damaging structures in the immediate area. Leaks that cannot be controlled and are expected to continue leaking. Uncontrolled fires involving hazardous materials. If it has been determined that evacuation is necessary, the following may be considered for evacuation: Request Law Branch/law enforcement to determine area to be evacuated. Direct Law Branch/law enforcement to determine evacuation authority, routes, perimeters, and notification of other law enforcement agencies as appropriate. Contact American Red Cross to locate, activate and operate necessary Evacuation Centers and relay their location to the Law Branch and PIO. If the Emergency Alert System, or other form of public notification system is to be requested/used, direct PIO to develop evacuation message including reason for evacuation, areas affected, evacuation routes, and locations of evacuation centers (if evacuation center site is known). Direct Law Branch to implement evacuation, including follow up, verification, anti- looting and transportation assistance teams as necessary. Contact County Office of Emergency Services (through the Sheriff’s Department City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 12 of 16 watch commander or dispatch) if Emergency Alert System, or other form of public notification, is to be requested or for any other special assistance or coordination. 4. Sheltering in Place Sheltering In place is used when evacuating the public would cause greater risk than staying indoors, or when an evacuation cannot be performed ahead of the threat. Sheltering In place operate on the theory that toxic vapors pass over structures without moving inside them. Research and accident investigation indicate that staying indoors is often safer than evacuating during a toxic cloud release. However, sustained and continuous release may eventually filter into a structure and endanger the occupants. Sheltering In place is not a substitute for evacuation; it is another tool for emergency responders to use when evacuation may be unsafe, infeasible, or unwarranted. It can also be used in combination with evacuation to protect separate threatened areas or at different points during the emergency. The Incident Commander or designee will act upon appropriate advice and recommendation from appropriate health and hazardous material personnel to shelter appropriate areas. Shelter In place protection may be a viable option when: The hazardous material has been identified and is a low to moderate health hazard. Personnel to assist with the evacuation are limited, and the hazardous evacuation areas cannot be properly managed. The material has been totally released from its container and is quickly dissipating. The hazardous material is a migrating toxic vapor cloud, and the citizens are safer inside the building than they would be outside. Short duration or solid or liquid leaks are present. Migrating vapor clouds are low in toxicity and quantity. Vapor clouds form "puff" or migrating plume patterns, e.g., clouds that will quickly disperse and are not from a fixed, continuous source. Leaks can be rapidly controlled at their source. Sheltering means staying inside with all doors, windows, and ventilation systems closed. Sheltering is intended to reduce or eliminate any exposure to a hazardous materials plume. 5. School Disruptions Schools would be immediately disrupted requiring them to shelter in place, evacuate or close. 6. Fires City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 13 of 16 Refer to Annex E, Fire Annex for additional information 7. Multiple Casualties See Annex C, Multiple Casualty Incident of this Plan for additional information. 8. Utilities: Natural Gas, Electricity, Water, Sanitation Water System contamination may occur. 9. Transportation Systems A Hazardous Materials event could disrupt normal transportation systems causing severe traffic management problems as well as delays to response, evacuation and logistical support. 10. Communication Disruptions Telephone equipment, both hard wired and cell sites, could be adversely affected primarily by overloading (calls in and out of the area). Essential service lines will most likely survive and can typically be relied upon in implementing this Plan. 11. Emergency Public Information During a Hazardous Materials event, the public will need basic emergency public information. This information will be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo's Public Information Officer via: Emergency Broadcast Messages over the Emergency Alerting System (E AS) Social Media AM/FM Radio Stations Local network television To avoid conflicting information, all public information should be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operation Center Public Information Officer. City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 14 of 16 V. Recovery The City of San Luis Obispo has a Recovery Plan, is included the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. The following points are a short Recovery. A. Re-Entry During transition into a recovery phase, areas affected by the Hazardous Materials should be inspected to determine if they are safe for public re-entry. Based on joint concurrence by the Unified Command Staff, state or federal representatives, re-entry will be authorized, and a Public Information message to that effect will be issued. B. Demobilization When response agencies are nearing completion of the last remaining life-safety Protective Action Missions, and when the Emergency Services Director (San Luis Obispo City Manager) or the Deputy Emergency Services Director (Assistant City Manager) determines that the disaster has entered into a recovery phase, the command staff should develop a formal demobilization plan. Consideration should also be given to assigning appropriate agencies to conduct short term recovery operations (e.g., debris removal, restoration of critical facilities, utilities and communications, and tending to the needs of the homeless and displaced, etc.) The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center should be downgraded as an Emergency Operations Center. The Emergency Operations Center will then become a Recovery Operations Center (ROC). It is desirable to attempt to restore departments to their normal working routine and environment as soon as possible. The Unified Command Staff, as well as other City of San Luis Obispo agencies, will be heavily involved in short and long-term recovery operations. C. Final Report and Activity Log All department heads from the City of San Luis Obispo departments involved in the Hazardous Materials event response will be required to complete a narrative report and a master activity log. The narrative report briefly describes the primary responsibility, the protective action missions performed and the total staff hours of involvement by the agency during the emergency phase of the Hazardous Materials event. The master activity log documents names and times of agency personnel involved in a mission, equipment and supplies used, and any contracts with a private vendor to support emergency operations. Most of this information can be extrapolated from individual activity logs used by team leaders during the emergency (ICS 214, Emergency Operations Center messages, Emergency Operations Center activity logs). A copy of the narrative report and activity logs should be forwarded to City Hall as soon as possible and will be part of the official record of the Hazardous Materials event disaster. City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 15 of 16 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption This is the official San Luis Obispo City Plan for Responding to a Hazardous Materials event occurring in, or threatening, the City of San Luis Obispo. B. Purpose The purpose of this Plan is to establish the City of San Luis Obispo's, command authority, responsibilities, and respond to the effects of a Hazardous Materials event affecting the City of San Luis Obispo. The priority of emergency response to a Hazardous Materials event shall be to minimize loss of life and property. The Plan is designed to unify all response agencies under the Incident Command System (ICS) in order to best utilize joint resources and more effectively minimize damage to the environment, life and property caused by the effects of a Hazardous Materials event. C. Authorities See Plan Summary, for a listing of all authorities and references. D. Scope 1. Relationship with Other Plans This Plan, a component of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan and is primarily intended to serve as a stand-alone response Plan for all effects associated with a Hazardous Materials event. Procedures within this Plan solely address emergency response and short-term recovery. The City of San Luis Obispo Hazardous Materials Response Plan is compatible with San Luis Obispo County, federal and state Emergency Response Plans. Should this type of event come about as the result of another disaster, that Disaster Plan will supersede this Plan. 2. Jurisdictional Factors This plan encompasses the jurisdictional limits of the City of San Luis Obispo. Copies of this Plan have been sent to the Santa Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services, incorporated cities, San Luis Coastal Unified School District, and locally based federal, state and military institutions for informational and coordination purposes. City of San Luis Obispo Annex B Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Hazardous Materials Event __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 16 of 16 E. Revision Page This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, the pages, the date the revision was posted, and the name of the person posting the revision. Revision # Revision Title Page Number Revised Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incidents ANNEX C Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Developed by: David L. Mathe Disaster Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 2 of 14 FORWARD Annex C, City of San Luis Obispo Multiple Casualty Incident Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to a Multiple Casualty Incident event. Preparedness measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if a Multiple Casualty Incident event impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be responsible for coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standard ized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the e mergency organization and the emergency management system for response to a damaging Multiple Casualty Incident impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of a Multiple Casualty Incident, the Fire Chief will a ssume the position of Unified Incident Commander. In the event the Fire Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alternates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo's position as Incident Commander. No. 1 – The Deputy Fire Chief or On-Duty on Duty Battalion Chief No. 2 – The On-Duty Police/Fire Person as appointed by the Fire or Police Chief No. 3 – The On-Duty highest ranking Fire Officer or Police Officer The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority during an emergency. _______________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief San Luis Obispo Fire Department Date: City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 3 of 14 Multiple Casualty Incident Table of Contents Section Page Forward 2 Table of Contents 3 I. Essentials 4 A. Initiating Event 4 B. Plan Activation 4 C. Initial Alerting II. Response 5 A. Emergency Operations Center Locations 5 B. Emergency Operations Center-Levels of Activation 5 C. Emergency Response Levels 6 D. Mass Casualty Event Levels of Activation 6 E. Transportation of Injured 7 F. Handling the Deceased 7 G. Situation Awareness Reporting 7 H. Situation Reporting Zones 8 I. Situation Zone Responsibilities 8 J. San Luis Obispo County Resources 9 III. Hazard Assessment 10 A. Hazard Assessment 10 IV. Potential Impacts 10 1. Leadership 10 2. Situation Reporting 10 3. Evacuation 10 4. Utilities—Natural Gas—Electric—Water—Sanitation 10 5. Transportation System 10 6. Communications Disruptions 10 7. Emergency Public Information 10 V. Recovery 12 A. Re-entry 12 B. Demobilization 12 C. Final Report and Activity Log 12 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption 13 B. Purpose 13 C. Authorities 13 D. Scope 13 E. Plan Revisions 14 City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 4 of 14 I. Essentials A. Initiating Event A report of a Multiple Casualty Incident is the initiating event that alerts the public and City of San Luis Obispo. The focal point for reporting initial Multiple Casualty Incident is the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Communication Center. B. Plan Activation It is the policy of the City of San Luis Obispo that a Multiple Casualty Incident, as referenced in this Plan, and in the judgment of the City Manager, Fire Chief or Police Chief, or their designee, warrants activation of this plan. If confirmed injuries are brought to the attention of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center, contact with the Unified Incident Commander (or authorized alternate) shoul d be attempted. If contact is possible, the Unified Incident Commander or alternate would be advised of the situation, including initial reports. Additionally, if contact with the Unified Incident Commander or any authorized alternate cannot be made, the on-duty Fire Officer or highest-ranking Police Officer may recommend Plan activation. Unified Command will provide leadership of a Multiple Casualty Incident with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. C. Initial Alerting Upon Plan activation, the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications will notify City departments of Plan and Emergency Operations Center activation, and to instruct them to mobilize should be made as follows:  The on-duty dispatchers (with the assistance of on-duty support staff) will:  Notify the City of San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center.  Alert all off-duty police, fire and public works of the incident.  Poll police and fire units and stations available resources. City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 5 of 14 II. Response A. Emergency Operations Center Locations: The following are the EOC locations for an emergency event. (Note: These locations may be adjusted or changed depending on the specific circumstances of event). EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) Primary: San Luis Obispo City Fire Department 2160 Santa Barbara Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Secondary: Ludwick Community Center 864 Santa Rosa Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 B. Emergency Operations Center – Levels of Activation The number of City staff at the EOC will depend on the level of activation. The person authorizing the activation of the EOC will determine the Level of Acti vation. The Emergency Services Director can, and should, change the activation level throughout the emergency as needed. The levels of activation are:  EOC LEVEL 1 A major disaster wherein local resources in or near the impacted area are overwhelmed and extensive state and/or federal resources are required. A local emergency and a state of emergency will be proclaimed. A Presidential Declaration of Emergency or major disaster will be requested. The EOC will be staffed to the highest number of personnel possible or necessary.  EOC LEVEL 2 A moderate to severe emergency wherein local resources are not adequate and mutual aid may be required on a regional or even statewide basis. A local emergency will be proclaimed, and a state of emergency might be proclaimed. The EOC will be moderately staffed.  EOC LEVEL 3 A minor to moderate incident wherein local resources are adequate and available. A local emergency may or may not be declared. The EOC will be minimally staffed. Note: Upon activation of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Operations Center, contact will be established with the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services. City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 6 of 14 C. Emergency Response Levels Emergency response for Multiple Casualty Incident emergencies is broken down into three levels:  Level 1, Severe Emergency: Total recall of all off-duty police, fire department personnel, and request the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center.  Level 2, Escalating Emergency: Increased number of incidents due to a Multiple Casualty Incident. On-duty crews cannot keep up with calls; however, the incident can be handled by calling out all off-duty Fire Department employees and with the assistance on-duty fire and police units.  Level 3, Non-Emergency: Always in effect day-to-day routine operations. No excessive incident load. On-duty crews can handle all calls. D. Mass Casualty Event—EMSA Levels of Activation  LEVEL I 3-10 patients A suddenly occurring event that has the potential to overwhelm any part of the EMS system and/or the number of patients is greater than can be handled by the usual initial response. Duration of the incident is expected to be less than 1 hour. Examples: Motor vehicle accident, tour bus, etc.  LEVEL II Greater than 11 patients A suddenly occurring event that has the potential to overwhelm any part of the EMS system and/or has the need for additional resources. The medical mutual aid system may be activated. An adequate number of additional ambulances are not likely to be immediately available, creating a delay in transporting patients. The duration of incident is expected to be greater than 1 hour. City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 7 of 14 E. Transportation of the Injured Calculation of the required number of Ambulances This guideline is meant to provide general guidance to determine the initial estimate for the number of transport ambulance units required to respond to a MCI based on the number of immediate patients. As a determination of the number of delayed and minor patients is made, additional ambulances or other transport vehicles, such as a bus, may be required. The request for additional transport vehicles, such as ambulance, bus, etc. should be made as early as possible. A general rule-of-thumb for determining how many ambulances should initially be requested by first-arriving personnel can be calculated using the following formula: REQUIRED AMBULANCES = _ NUMBER OF IMMEDIATE PATIENTS + Plus One (1) DIVIDED BY TWO (2) Example: Ten (10) immediate patients + 1 = Six (6) ALS units/ambulances 2 AIR UNITS=Consider early polling, activation, and integration into transportation plan! F. Handling the Deceased Sheriff-Coroner directs the on-site morgue operations. If it becomes necessary to move bodies in order to accomplish rescue/extrication and/or treatment of casualties, protect the health and safety of others, or to prevent further harm to the bodies, the following procedures should be followed: • Do not remove any personal effects from the bodies. • Tag the bodies with approved triage tags to indicate death. • Bodies must always be secured and safeguarded; personnel should be assigned to monitor morgue areas. • No variations to these procedures are authorized without the approval of the Morgue Manager, Sheriff-Coroner, or their representative. G. Situation Awareness Reporting 1. General The priority upon Plan activation is situation reporting: the process of getting a complete and comprehensive picture of the injuries caused by the event. Immediately after a Multiple Casualty Incident, situation reporting may be minimal. It is recognized that complete injury intelligence may take several hours to several days to get a complete and stable citywide assessment. Continuing situation reporting is critically important and is the foundation on which EOC/field actions are based every effort must be made to immediately initiate a field survey within a Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ) and to gather the best available information, City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 8 of 14 and report that information through channels to the City of San Luis Obispo EOC as soon as possible. Situation Reports may become available from the other sources, i.e.:  General Public  News and Social Media  San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Emergency Communications Center  County of San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services  City of San Luis Obispo Radio equipped field units  Caltrans  California Highway Patrol  SEMPRA (formerly known as Southern California Gas Company)  Area Medical Centers  San Luis Obispo Coastal Unified School District  Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) The individual field Situation Reporting Groups within the Operations Section will conduct a field survey of an area or Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ). Early reports may include the following:  Rescue needs (estimated number trapped)  Serious mass injuries (estimated number)  Deceased (estimated number)  Damaging Multiple Casualty Incident  Serious hazardous material spills  Any other critical emergency or situation observed. Note: Where no injuries occur within an SRZ, “no injury” reports are still required in order to insure complete incident intelligence. H. Situation Reporting Zones In the event of a damaging event, the City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into seven Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ’s). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 9 of 14 Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no injury occurs within an SRZ, “no injury” reports are still required in order to insure complete injury intelligence. I. Situation Zone Responsibilities DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY Police Department Citywide primary survey Fire Department Citywide survey for rescue, injuries and fire Public Works Citywide survey of streets, facilities and, parks Survey of water, wastewater, electric, broadband and solid waste services Information Technology Citywide survey for communication compromise Community Development Citywide survey of critical facilities for, structural issues, and posting of unsafe buildings Utilities Citywide survey of freshwater and waste disposal systems PG & E Utilities Survey for condition of their transmission lines San Luis Coastal Unified School District Survey for condition of their facility and personnel Caltrans Jurisdictional survey for State highways J. San Luis Obispo County Resources The Office of Emergency Services (OES) coordinates all requests for assistance for San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at 805.781.1144. III. Hazard Assessment The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identification and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. Responsibilities Listed below is a general assessment that may result from a Multiple Casualty Incident. The exact circumstances of Multiple Casualty Incident event may dictate some flexibility and adjustments. A. Hazard Assessment 1. Potential Threats The potential for a Multiple Casualty Incident in the City of San Luis Obispo always exists. City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 10 of 14 Surface Roadways US 101 is heavily traveled with trucks, private cars, and passenger buses. Highways 227 and 1 are regular truck routes, carries automobile traffic and tour bus traffic. Railway The coast route of the Union Pacific Railroad passes through the City of San Luis Obispo. The line carries several northbound and southbound freight trains every day. Passenger service is currently limited to one northbound and one southbound train daily. Air In addition to flights in and out of the San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport, McChesney Field, commercial and private air traffic passes over the City of San Luis Obispo. Military aircraft utilizes Vandenberg Air Force Base. As a result, the potential exists for a Multiple Casualty Incident that could quickly overrun the capabilities of the City of San Luis Obispo’s fire departments. 2. Potential Range of Impacts A Multiple Casualty Incident that occurs in a heavily populated residential area can result in considerable loss of life and property. IV. Potential Impacts The following potential emergencies that may be caused as a result of a Multiple Casualty Incident impacting this City of San Luis Obispo are: 1. Leadership 2. Situation Reporting 3. Evacuation 4. Utilities 5. Transportation Systems 6. Communication Disruptions 7. Emergency Public Information This Plan does not presume to predict the full range and depth of a Mass Casualty Incident. It does, however, attempt to reflect the most accurate estimate of the nature of emergencies or complications resulting from a Mass Casualty Incident occurring in or threatening the City of San Luis Obispo. 1. Leadership  The strain on local government and its emergency response organization to command and coordinate the response to a Multiple Casualty Incident could be immediate, severe, and overwhelming.  Out-of-county assistance from state, federal, mutual aid and private agencies will probably not be needed in anything but the most extreme situations. City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 11 of 14 2. Situation Reporting  A Multiple Casualty Incident may initiate many types of emergencies and injuries simultaneously over a widespread area.  This overwhelm emergency resources and preclude the traditional direct response to each emergency. 3. Evacuation  The widespread evacuation of this community based on a Multiple Casualty Incident is a very remote possibility. 4. Utilities  Normal utility systems may be disrupted for short per iods of time because of a Multiple Casualty Incident. 5. Transportation Systems  A Multiple Casualty Incident could disrupt normal transportation systems causing severe traffic management problems as well as delays to response, evacuation and logistical support. 6. Communication Disruptions  Telephone equipment, both hard wired and cell sites, could be adversely affected primarily by overloading (calls in and out of the area), and complicated by condition of equipment.  Essential service lines will most likely survive. 7. Emergency Public Information  During a Multiple Casualty Incident, the public will need basic emergency public information.  This information will be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo's Public Information Officer via:  Emergency Broadcast Messages over the Emergency Alerting System (EAS)  Social Media  AM/FM Radio Stations  Local network television City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 12 of 14 V. Recovery The City of San Luis Obispo has a Recovery Plan, part 4, of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. The following points are a short overview of items covered in more detail in that document. A. Re-Entry During transition into a recovery phase, areas affected by the Multiple Casualty Incident should be inspected to determine if they are safe for public re-entry. Based on joint concurrence by the Unified Command Staff, state or federal representatives, re-entry will be authorized, and an Emergency Alert System (EAS) message to that effect will be issued. B. Demobilization When response agencies are nearing completion of the last remaining life-safety Protective Action Missions, and when the Emergency Services Director (City of San Luis Obispo City Manager) or the Deputy Emergency Services Director (Assistant City Manager) determines that the disaster has entered into a recovery phase, the command staff should develop a formal demobilization plan. Consideration should also be given to assigning appropriate agencies to conduct short term recovery operations (e.g., debris removal, restoration of critical facilities, utilities and communications, and tending to the needs of the homeless and displaced, etc.) The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center should be downgraded as an Emergency Operations Center. The Emergency Operations Center will then become a Recovery Operations Center (ROC). It is desirable to attempt to restore agencies to their normal working routine and environment as soon as possible. The Unified Command Staff, as well as other City of San Luis Obispo agencies, will be heavily involved in short and long-term recovery operations. C. Final Report and Activity Log All department heads from the City of San Luis Obispo departments involved in the Multiple Casualty Incident response will be required to complete a narrative report and a master activity log. The narrative report briefly describes the primary responsibility, the protective action missions performed and the total staff hours of involvement by the agency during the emergency phase of the Multiple Casualty Incident. The master activity log documents names and times of agency personnel involved in a mission, equipment and supplies used, and any contracts with a private vendor to support emergency operations. Most of this information can be extrapolated from individual activity l ogs used by team leaders during the emergency (ICS 214, Emergency Operations Center messages, Emergency Operations Center activity logs). A copy of the narrative report and activity logs should be forwarded to the Plans Section as soon as possible and will be part of the official record of the Multiple Casualty Incident disaster. City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 13 of 14 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption This is the official City of San Luis Obispo Plan for Responding to a Multiple Casualty Incident occurring in, or threatening, the City of San Luis Obispo. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below. B. Purpose The purpose of this Plan is to establish the City of San Luis Obispo's response organization, command authority, responsibilities, functions and interactions required to mitigate the effects of a Multiple Casualty Incident affecting the City of San Luis Obispo. The priority of emergency response to a damaging event shall be to minimize loss of life and property. Although focusing primarily on the City of San Luis Obispo's response, this Plan also identifies other local, county, state, federal and private sector responsibilities. The Plan is designed to unify all response agencies under the Incident Command System (ICS) in order to best utilize joint resources and more effectively minimize any impacts to life and property caused by the effects of a Multiple Casualty Incident. C. Authorities See the Plan Summary, for a listing of all authorities and references. D. Scope 1. Relationship with Other Plans This Plan, a component of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan and is primarily intended to serve as a stand-alone Multiple Casualty Incident Response Plan. Procedures within this Plan address emergency response and short-term recovery. The City of San Luis Obispo Multiple Casualty Incident is compatible with other city, federal, county and state emergency response plans. Should this type of event come about as the result of another disaster, that Disaster Plan will supersede this Plan. 2. Jurisdictional Factors This plan encompasses the City of San Luis Obispo jurisdictional limits of the City of San Luis Obispo. Copies of this Plan have been sent to the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services, incorporated cities, San Luis Coastal Unified School District, and locally based federal, state and military institutions for informational and coordination purposes. E. Revision Page City of San Luis Obispo Annex C Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Multiple Casualty Incident __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 14 of 14 This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, revision title, page number revised date the revision was posted and the name of the person posting the revision. The format for numbering revisions shall be a sequential number followed by the last two digits of the current calendar year (e.g., #1-15, #2-15, and so on). New sequential revision numbers will begin each January 1. Revision # Revision Title Page Number Revised Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency Air-Surface Annex D Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Developed by: David L. Mathe Disaster Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 2 of 14 FORWARD Annex D, City of San Luis Obispo Transportation Emergency Management Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to a Transportation Emergency of significant proportions. Response measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if a major Transportation Emergency impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be responsible for coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standardized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the emergency organization and the emergency management system for response to a Transportation Emergency impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of a Transportation Emergency, the Fire Chief will assume the position of Unified Incident Commander. In the event the Fire Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alternates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo's position as Incident Commander. No. 1 – The Deputy Fire Chief or On-Duty on Duty Battalion Chief No. 2 – The On-Duty Police/Fire Officer as appointed by the Fire or Police Chief No. 3 – The On-Duty highest ranking Fire Officer or Police Officer The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority during an emergency. _________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 3 of 14 Transportation Table of Contents Section Page Forward 2 Table of Contents 3 I. Essentials 5 A. Transportation Definitions 5 1. Transportation Emergency 5 2. Types of Transportation 5 B. Initiating Event 6 C. Transportation Plan Activation 6 D. Initial Alerting 6 II. Response 7 A. Emergency Operations Center Locations 7 B. Emergency Operations Center-Levels of Activation 7 C. Emergency Response Levels 7 D. Situation Awareness Reporting 8 E. Situation Reporting Zones 9 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities 9 G. San Luis Obispo County Resources 9 III. Hazard Assessment 10 A. Hazard Assessment 10 1. Potential Threats 10 2. Range of Damage 10 IV. Impacts 10 1. Leadership 10 2. Situation Reporting 11 3. Multiple Casualties 11 4. Hazardous Materials release 11 5. Major Fires 11 6. Evacuation 11 7. Utilities—Natural Gas—Electric—Water—Sanitation 11 8. Transportation System 11 9. Communication Disruptions 11 10. Emergency Public Information 11 11. Security 11 12. Building Inspections 12 V Recovery 12 A. Re-entry 12 B. Demobilization 12 C. Final Report and Activity Log 12 City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 4 of 14 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption 13 B. Purpose 13 C. Authorities 13 D. Scope 13 E. Plan Revisions 14 City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 5 of 14 I. Essentials A. Transportation Emergency Definitions 1. Transportation Emergency A transportation emergency (semi-truck, railway, commercial or private aircraft, school bus, commercial bus, multiple vehicle or local mass transit), either in the City of San Luis Obispo or threatening the City of San Luis Obispo, or any major transportation event of disastrous proportions that causes any one of the following: Any transportation event that in the opinion of the City of San Luis Obispo Manager, Fire Chief (or designee) Police Chief (or designee) that warrants the activation of this Plan. Transportation incidents can cause great loss of property or life. The greatest loss of life can occur when commercial passenger carriers such as trains, airliners, or buses are involved. Multiple vehicle accidents can result in many injuries and fatalities. 2. Types of Transportation Highways US 101 is the primary highway route . It carries truck, freight, private cars, and passenger buses. Highways 1 and 227 are regular truck routes, carries automobile traffic and tour bus traffic. Railway The coast route of the Union Pacific Railroad passes through the City of San Luis Obispo. Union Pacific carries several northbound and southbound freight trains every day. AMTRAK service is currently offering northbound and southbound passenger trains daily. Air Accident In addition to flights in and out of the San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport, McChesney Field. Military aircraft and commercial aircraft pass over the City of San Luis Obispo on a daily basis. A major air accident that occurs in a heavily populated residential area can result in considerable loss of life and property. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 6 of 14 Damage assessment and relief efforts associated with a major air accident will require support from other local governments, private organizations, and in certain instances, from the state and federal governments. Investigators from the National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB) and the San Luis Obispo County Coroner’s Office will have initial jurisdiction over the accident area and investigations will be completed before the area is released for debris mitigation. The recovery operation may consist of debris removal and disposal. B. Initiating Event The Transportation Emergency is the initiating event that alerts the public and the City of San Luis Obispo. The focal point for reporting a Transportation Emergency is the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Communications Center. C. Plan Activation If damage is confirmed and brought to the attention of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center contact with the Unified Incident Commander (or authorized alternate) should be attempted. If contact is possible, the Unified Incident Commander or alternate would be advised of the situation, including initial damage reports. If contact with the Unified Incident Commander or any authorized alternate cannot be made, Deputy Fire Chief, the on-duty Fire Officer or highest-ranking Police Officer may recommend Plan activation. D. Initial Alerting Upon Plan activation, the San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications will notify City departments of Plan and Emergency Operations Center activation. EOC mobilization instructions are as follows: The on-duty dispatchers (with the assistance of on-duty support staff) will: Notify the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Alert all off-duty police, fire and public works personnel and have them report to assigned work areas. Poll police and fire units and stations for damage assessment and available resources. Alert on-duty police and fire units and instruct them to begin Situation Reporting in the Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ). City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 7 of 14 II. Response A. Emergency Operations Center Locations: The following are the EOC locations for an emergency event. (Note: These locations may be adjusted or changed depending on the specific circumstances of the event). EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) Primary: San Luis Obispo City Fire Department 2160 Santa Barbara Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Secondary: Ludwick Community Center 864 Santa Rosa Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 B. Emergency Operations Center – Levels of Activation The number of City staff at the EOC will depend on the level of activation. The person authorizing the activation of the EOC will determine the Level of Activation. The Emergency Services Director may change the activation level throughout the emergency as needed. The levels of activation are: EOC LEVEL 1 A major disaster where local resources are overwhelmed. State and/or federal resources are required. A local emergency and a state of emergency will be proclaimed. A Presidential Declaration of Emergency or major disaster will be requested. The EOC will be staffed to the highest number of personnel possible or necessary. EOC LEVEL 2 A moderate to severe emergency wherein local resources are not adequate and mutual aid may be required on a regional or even statewide basis. A local emergency and a state of emergency may be proclaimed. The EOC will be moderately staffed. EOC LEVEL 3 A minor to moderate incident wherein local resources are adequate and available. A local emergency may or may not be declared. The EOC will be minimally staffed. Note: Upon activation of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Operations Center, contact will be established with the County of San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services. C. Emergency Response Levels Emergency response for Transportation Emergency emergencies is broken down into three levels: Level 1, Severe Emergency: Total recall of all off-duty police, fire department personnel, and request the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 8 of 14 Level 2, Escalating Emergency: Increased number of incidents due to the Transportation Emergency. On-duty crews cannot keep up with calls however, the incident can be handl ed by calling out all off-duty public works department employees and with the assistance of on-duty fire and police units. Level 3, Non-Emergency: Always in effect day-to-day routine operations. No excessive incidents. On-duty crews can handle all calls. D. Situation Awareness Reporting 1. General The priority upon Plan activation is situation reporting: the process of getting a complete and comprehensive picture of the damages caused by the event. Immediately after a Transportation Emergency, situation reporting may be minimal. It is recognized that complete damage intelligence may take several hours get a complete citywide assessment. Continuing situation reporting is critically important and is the foundation on which EOC/field actions are based. Every effort must be made to immediately initiate a field survey within a Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ) and to gather the best available information. Report that information to the City of San Luis Obispo EOC as soon as possible. Situation Reports may become available from the other sources, i.e.: General Public News and Social Media San Luis Obispo County Emergency Communications Center San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services City of San Luis Obispo Radio equipped field units Caltrans California Highway Patrol SEMPRA (formerly known as Southern California Gas Company) Area Medical Centers San Luis Coastal Unified School District Pacific Gas and Electric (PG & E) The individual field Situation Reporting Groups within the Operations Section will conduct a field survey of an assigned area or Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ). Early reports may include the following: Rescue needs (estimated number trapped) Serious mass injuries (estimated number) Deceased (estimated number) Damaging Transportation Emergency Serious hazardous material spills Any other critical emergency or situation observed. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 9 of 14 E. Situation Reporting Zones In the event of a damaging event, the City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into four Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ’s). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no damage occurs within an SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. F. Situation Zone Responsibilities DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY Police Department Citywide primary survey for all damages Fire Department Citywide survey for damage, rescue, injuries and fire Public Works Citywide survey for streets, facilities and, parks damage Survey for water, wastewater, electric, broadband and solid waste damages Information Technology Citywide survey for communication damage Community Development Citywide survey of critical facilities for adverse weather- related damage, structural damage, and posting of unsafe buildings Utilities Citywide survey of freshwater and waste disposal systems PG & E Utilities Survey for condition of their transmission lines San Luis Coastal Unified School District Survey for condition of their facility and personnel Caltrans Jurisdictional survey for State highways G. San Luis Obispo County Resources The Office of Emergency Services (OE S) coordinates all requests for assistance for San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at 805.781.1144. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 10 of 14 The American Red Cross works together with the Care and Shelter Branch to identify and establish evacuation and general population shelter sites. In most cases the Care and Shelter Branch provides a supporting role to the American Red Cross. III. Hazard Assessment The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identification and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. General Agency Responsibilities Listed below is a general assessment that may result from a damaging Transportation. The exact circumstances of a Transportation event may dictate some flexibility and adjustments. A. Hazard Assessment 1. Potential Threats The potential for a transportation emergency in the City of San Luis Obispo always exists. Transportation emergencies are the primary areas of concern of this annex. The potential exists for a transportation emergency that could quickly over-run the capabilities of both the City of San Luis Obispo’s and other local government fire departments. 2. Potential Range of Impacts Many Transportation emergencies cause little or no damage. IV. Potential Impacts The following potential impacts that may be triggered as a result of a transportation emergency impacting this City of San Luis Obispo include: 1. Leadership 2. Situation Reporting 3. Multiple Casualties 4. Hazardous Materials Release 5. Major Fire 6. Evacuation 7. Utilities-Natural Gas-Electric-Water-Sanitation Security 8. Transportation Systems 9. Communication Disruption 10. Emergency Public Information 11. Security 12. Building Inspection 1. Leadership The strain on local government and its emergency response organization to lead and coordinate the response to a transportation emergency could be immediate, severe, and overwhelming. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 11 of 14 Out-of-county assistance from state, federal, mutual aid and private agencies may not be needed in anything but the most extreme situations. 2. Situation Reporting An overall assessment and prioritization of emergencies/hazards through a centralized means of situation reporting will be one of the first critical actions. 3. Multiple Casualties See Annex C, Multiple Casualty Incident of this Plan for additional information. 4. Hazardous Materials Releases: Refer to Annex B, Hazardous Materials Annex for additional information. 5. Major Fires: Refer to Annex E, Fire Annex for additional information. 6. Evacuation A Transportation emergency could require evacuations on a very limited basis. 7. Utilities--Natural Gas-Electric-Water-Sanitation Normal utility systems may fail or be disrupted for short periods of time because of a transportation emergency. 8. Transportation Systems A transportation emergency could disrupt normal transportation systems, causing severe traffic management problems as well as delays to response, evacuation and logistical support. 9. Communication Disruptions A transportation emergency may temporarily interrupt limited portions of the telephone system in the immediate area. Most of the telephone system will remain in service. 10. Emergency Public Information During a transportation emergency, the public will need basic emergency public information. This information will be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo's Public Information Officer via: Emergency Broadcast Messages over the Emergency Alerting System (EAS) Social Media AM/FM Radio Stations Local network television 11. Security City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 12 of 14 Access into and out of the most highly damaged areas, mostly to ensure public safety, will be a major consideration for law enforcement agencies. 12. Building Inspections • Building inspections may be required. IV. Recovery The City of San Luis Obispo has a Recovery Plan, in the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. The following points are a short overview of items covered in more detail in that document. A. Re-entry During transition into a recovery phase, areas affected by the transportation emergency should be inspected to determine if they are safe for public re-entry. Based on joint concurrence by the Unified Command Staff, state or federal representatives, re-entry will be authorized, and an EAS message to that effect will be issued. B. Demobilization When response agencies are nearing completion of the last remaining life-safety Protective Action Missions, and when the Emergency Services Director (San Luis Obispo City Manager) or the Deputy Emergency Services Director (Assistant City Manager) determines that the event has entered into a recovery phase, the command staff should develop a formal demobilization plan. Consideration should also be given to assigning appropriate agencies to conduct short term recovery operations. The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center should be downgraded as an Emergency Operations Center. The Emergency Operations Center will then become a Recovery Operations Center (ROC). It is desirable to attempt to restore departments to their normal working routine and environment as soon as possible. The Unified Command Staff, as well as other City of San Luis Obispo departments, will be heavily involved in short and long-term recovery operations. C. Final Report and Activity Log All department heads from the City of San Luis Obispo departments involved in the transportation emergency response will be required to complete a narrative report and a master activity log. The narrative report briefly describes the primary responsibility, the protective action missions performed and the total staff hours of involvement by the agency during the emergency phase of the transportation emergency. The master activity log documents names and times of agency personnel involved in a mi ssion, equipment and supplies used, and any contracts with a private vendor to support emergency operations. Most of this information can be extrapolated from individual activity logs used by team leaders during the emergency (ICS 214, EOC messages, EOC activity logs). A copy of the narrative report and activity logs should be forwarded to the Plans Section as soon as possible and will be part of the official record of the transportation emergency disaster. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 13 of 14 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption This is the official San Luis Obispo City Plan for Responding to a Transportation Emergency occurring in, or threatening, the City of San Luis Obispo. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below. B. Purpose The purpose of this Plan is to establish the City of San Luis Obispo's response organization, Leadership authority, responsibilities, functions and interactions required to mitigate the effects of a Transportation Emergency affecting the City of San Luis Obispo. The priority of emergency response to a damaging event shall be to minimize loss of life and property. The Plan is designed to unify all response agencies under the Incident Command System (ICS) in order to best utilize joint resources and more effectively minimize damage to life and property caused by the effects of a Transportation Emergency. C. Authorities See the Plan Summary, for a listing of all authorities and references. D. Scope 1. Relationship with Other Plans This Plan, a component of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan, is primarily intended to serve as a stand-alone Transportation Emergency Response Plan. Procedures within this Plan address emergency response and short-term recovery. The City of San Luis Obispo Transportation Emergency Plan is compatible with federal, county and state emergency response plans. Should this type of event come about as the result of another disaster, that Disaster Plan will supersede this Plan. 2. Jurisdictional Factors This plan encompasses the City of San Luis Obispo jurisdictional limits. Copies of this Plan have been sent to the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services, incorporated cities, San Luis Coastal Unified School District, and locally based federal, state and military institutions for informational and coordination purposes. City of San Luis Obispo Annex D Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Transportation Emergency For Official Use Only Page 14 of 14 E. Revision Page This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, the pages, the date the revision was posted, and the name of the person posting the revision. The format for numbering revisions shall be a sequential number followed by the last two digits of the current calendar year (e.g., #1-15, #2-15, and so on). New sequential revision numbers will begin each January 1. Revision # Revision Title Page Number Revised Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire ANNEX E Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Developed by: David L. Mathe Emergency Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 2 of 16 FORWARD Annex E, City of San Luis Obispo Fire Emergency Management Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo’s response to a fire. Preparedness measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if a fire impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be responsible for coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standardized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the emergency organization and the emergency management system for response to a damaging fire impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of a damaging fire, the Fire Chief will assume the position of Unified Incident Commander. In the event the Fire Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alternates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo’s position as Incident Commander. No. 1 – The Deputy Fire Chief or On-Duty Fire Battalion Chief No. 2 – The On-Duty highest ranking Fire Officer or Police Officer No. 3-- The On-Duty Fire Officer or Police as appointed by the Fire or Police Chief The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority during an emergency. _______________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department Date: City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 3 of 16 Fire Table of Contents Section Page Forward 2 Table of Contents 3 I. Essentials 5 A. Initiating Event 5 B. Fire Plan Activation 5 C. Initial Alerting 5 II. Response 6 A. Emergency Operations Center Locations 6 B. Emergency Operations Center-Levels of Activation 6 C. Emergency Response Levels 7 D. Situation Awareness Reporting 7 E. Situation Reporting Zones 8 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities 9 G. San Luis Obispo County Resources 9 III. Hazard Assessment 10 A. Hazard Assessment 10 IV. Potential Impacts 11 1. Leadership 11 2. Situation Reporting 11 3. Hazardous Materials 12 4. Evacuation 12 5. Utilities: Natural Gas—Electric—Water—Sanitation 12 6. Transportation System 12 7. Communication Disruptions 12 8. Emergency Public Information 13 9. Security 13 10. Donation Management 13 11. Care and Shelter 13 V. Emergency Recovery 14 A. Re-entry 14 B. Demobilization 14 C. Final Report and Activity Log 14 VI. Plan Administration 15 A. Plan Adoption 15 City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 4 of 16 B. Purpose 15 C. Authorities 15 D. Scope 15 E. Plan Revisions 16 City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 5 of 16 I. Essentials A. Initiating Event The fire is the initiating event that alerts the public and the City of San Luis Obispo. The focal point for reporting initial fire damage is the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Communication Center. B. Fire Plan Activation It is the policy of the City of San Luis Obispo that a fire, as referenced in this Plan, and in the judgment of the City Manager, Fire Chief or Police Chief, or their designee, warrants activation of this plan. If a fire is confirmed and is brought to the attention of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center, contact with the Unified Incident Commander (or authorized alternate) should be attempted. If contact by phone is possible, the Unified Incident Commander or alternate would be advised of the situation (including initial damage reports) by the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center. If contact with the Unified Incident Commander or any authorized alternate cannot be made, the Deputy Fire Chief, on-duty Battalion Fire Chief or highest-ranking Police Officer may recommend Plan activation. Unified Command will provide leadership of a Fire with the Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief or on duty Battalion Chief providing guidance to the Unified Command Staff. C. Initial Alerting Upon Plan activation, the San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications will notify City departments of Plan and Emergency Operations Center activation. EOC mobilization instructions are as follows:  The on-duty dispatchers (with the assistance of on-duty support staff) will: Notify the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Alert all off-duty police, fire and public works personnel and have them report to assigned work areas. Poll police and fire units and stations for damage assessment and available resources. Alert on-duty police and fire units and instruct them to begin Situation Reporting in the Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ). City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 6 of 16 II. Response A. Emergency Operations Center Locations: The following are the EOC locations for an emergency event. (Note: These locations may be adjusted or changed depending on the specific circumstances of event). EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) Primary: San Luis Obispo City Fire Department 2160 Santa Barbara Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Secondary: Ludwick Community Center 864 Santa Rosa Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 B. Emergency Operations Center – Levels of Activation The number of City staff at the EOC will depend on the level of activation. The person authorizing the activation of the EOC will determine the Level of Activation. The Emergency Services Director can, and should, change the activation level throughout the emergency as needed. The levels of activation are: EOC LEVEL I A major disaster wherein local resources are overwhelmed. State and/or federal resources are required. A local emergency and a state of emergency will be proclaimed. A Presidential Declaration of Emergency or major disaster will be requested. The EOC will be staffed to the highest number of personnel possible or necessary. EOC LEVEL II A moderate to severe emergency wherein local resources are not adequate and mutual aid may be required on a regional or even statewide basis. A local emergency will be proclaimed, and a state of emergency might be proclaimed. The EOC will be moderately staffed. EOC LEVEL III A minor to moderate incident wherein local resources are adequate and available. A local emergency may or may not be declared. The EOC will be minimally staffed. Note: Upon activation of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Operations Center contact will be established with the County of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Operations Center. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 7 of 16 C. Emergency Response Levels Emergency response for fire emergencies is broken down into three levels: Level 1, Severe Emergency: Total recall of all off-duty police, fire department personnel, and request the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Level 2, Escalating Emergency: Increased number of incidents due to a fire. On-duty crews cannot keep up with calls. The incident can be handled by calling out all off-duty Fire Department employees and with the assistance on-duty fire and police units. Level 3, Non-Emergency: Always in effect day-to-day routine operations. No excessive incident load. On-duty crews can handle all calls. D. Situation Awareness Reporting 1. General The priority upon plan activation is situation reporting: the process of getting a complete and comprehensive picture of the damages caused by the event. Immediately after a damaging fire, situation reporting may be minimal. It is recognized that complete damage intelligence may take several hours to several days to get a complete and stable citywide assessment. Continuing situation reporting is critically important and is the foundation on which EOC/field actions are based. Every effort must be made to immediately initiate a field survey within a Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ) and to gather the best available information, and report that information through channels to the City of San Luis Obispo EOC as soon as possible. Situation Reports may become available from the other sources, i.e.:  General Public  News and Social Media  San Luis Obispo City Emergency Communications Center  San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services  City of San Luis Obispo Radio equipped field units  Caltrans  California Highway Patrol  SEMPRA (formerly known as Southern California Gas Company)  San Luis Coastal Unified School District  Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E)  Area Medical Centers City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 8 of 16 The individual field Situation-Reporting Groups within the Operations Section will conduct a field survey of an area or Situation-Reporting Zone (SRZ). Early reports would include the following:  Rescue needs (estimated number trapped)  Serious mass injuries (estimated number)  Deceased (estimated number)  Fires  Serious hazardous material spills  Any other critical emergency/problem observed. E. Situation Reporting Zones In the event of a damaging major event, the City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into three Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ's). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no damage occurs within a SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 9 of 16 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY Police Department Citywide primary survey for all damages Fire Department Citywide survey for damage, rescue, injuries and fire Public Works Citywide survey for streets, facilities and, parks damage Survey for water, wastewater, electric, broadband and solid waste damages Information Technology Citywide survey for communication damage Community Development Citywide survey of critical facilities for adverse weather related damage, structural damage, and posting of unsafe buildings Utilities Citywide survey of freshwater and waste disposal systems PG & E Utilities Survey for condition of their transmission lines San Luis Coastal Unified School District Survey for condition of their facility and personnel Caltrans Jurisdictional survey for State highways G. San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Management The Office of Emergency Services (OES) coordinates all requests for assistance from San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at 805.781.1144. The American Red Cross works together with the Care and Shelter Branch to identify and establish evacuation and general population shelter sites. In most cases the Care and Shelter Branch provides a supporting role to the American Red Cross. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 10 of 16 III. Hazard Assessment The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identification and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. General Agency Responsibilities Listed below are the potential emergencies or problems resulting from a damaging fire . The exact circumstances of the event may dictate some flexibility and adjustments. A. Hazard Assessment 1. Potential Threats The potential for a fire in the City of San Luis Obispo always exists. Residential, wildland-urban interface, industrial, and commercial areas, along with transportation fires are the primary areas of concern. The City of San Luis Obispo’s geographic location has a threat from a wildland fire. There are several areas in the community where homes and businesses are built closely together, providing difficult access and with very little defensible space. In addition, the construction of many of these buildings, often wood-frame with wood siding and combustible roofs, would offer significant fuel to a wind or topographically driven fire. The City of San Luis Obispo has several older, un-reinforced masonry buildings and many wood framed structures spread throughout the community. Typically, these buildings lack modern fire protection systems and given their construction type could pose challenges for the Fire Department. A significant number of very large buildings can be found in the commercial and industrial areas of the City of San Luis Obispo. As a result, the potential exists for a fire that could quickly over-run the capabilities of both the City of San Luis Obispo’s and other local government fire departments. 2. Potential Range of Impacts Structure fires and wildland-urban interface fires could have a significant fiscal impact on the City of San Luis Obispo. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 11 of 16 IV. Potential Impacts This Section does not presume to predict the full range and depth of fire impacts. The following potential emergencies that may be caused as a result of a light to heavy damage fire impacting this City of San Luis Obispo include: 1. Leadership 2. Situation Reporting 3. Hazardous Materials 4. Evacuation 5. Utilities: Natural Gas, Electric, Water, Sanitation 6. Transportation Systems 7. Communication Disruptions 8. Emergency Public Information 9. Security 10. Hazardous Materials 10. Donation Management 11. Care and Shelter These impacts are discussed in detail below are a basis for response to a fire. This Plan does not presume to predict the full range and depth of fire consequences. It does, however, attempt to reflect the most accurate estimate of the nature of impacts resulting from a fire occurring in, or threatening the City of San Luis Obispo. 1. Leadership  The strain on local government and its emergency response organization to command and coordinate the response to a fire could be immediate, severe, and overwhelming.  Initial out-of-county assistance will probably not occur within the first 24 hours.  Full assistance from out of county departments may not arrive until well after the first 72 hours.  San Luis Obispo must presume that they will essentially be on their own, with only local surviving resources, for 72 hours. 2. Situation-Reporting  A fire may initiate many types of emergencies and damages simultaneously over a widespread area. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 12 of 16  An overall assessment and prioritization of emergencies through a centralized means of situation reporting will be one of the first critical actions taken by the City of San Luis Obispo.  On-duty radio-equipped public safety and public works units may be the only means available to provide an initial survey of field areas and report damage information back to the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Communications Center. 3. Hazardous Materials Releases:  Refer to Annex B, Hazardous Materials Annex for additional information. 4. Evacuation  The widespread evacuation of this community based on a wildland fire threat is a very remote possibility.  A large structure fire may require evacuations on a very limited basis. 5. Utilities: Natural Gas, Electricity, Water, Sanitation  Normal utility systems may fail or be disrupted for short periods of time because of a fire.  Loss of electrical power would primarily be from breakage of overhead wires caused by fire damage to the power poles and lines.  Water line breakage should be anticipated at structures damaged by fire.  Leaks and breaks along main distribution lines may also occur, caused by the heavy flows required for firefighting operations.  Heavy demand on pump stations and storage facilities can be anticipated. 6. Transportation Systems  A fire could disrupt normal transportation systems as well as delaying to a fire. 7. Communication Disruptions  A fire may disable portions of the telephone system.  Telephone equipment, both hard wired and cell sites, could be adversely affected, primarily by overloading by physical damage and condition of equipment. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 13 of 16  Essential service lines will most likely survive and can typically be relied upon in implementing this Plan. 8. Emergency Public Information  During a fire, the public will need basic emergency public information.  This information will be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo's Public Information Officer via:  Emergency Broadcast Messages over the Emergency Alerting System (EAS) Social Media Audio Media Visual Media 9. Security Access into and out of the most highly damaged areas, mostly to ensure public safety, will be a major consideration for law enforcement departments. 10. Donation Management The local Salvation Army and/or Faith Based Organization may aid in receiving, inventorying and distributing volunteer donations of food, clothing, water, etc. 11. Care and Shelter Some displaced persons may be self-sufficient in nature. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 14 of 16 V. Emergency Recovery The City of San Luis Obispo has a Recovery Plan, part 4, of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. The following points are a short overview of items covered in more detail in that document. A. Re-Entry During transition into a recovery phase, areas affected by the fire should be inspected to determine if they are safe for public re-entry. Based on joint concurrence by the Unified Command Staff, state or federal representatives, re-entry will be authorized, and an EAS message to that effect will be issued. B. Demobilization When response departments are nearing completion of the last remaining life-safety Protective Action Missions, and when the Emergency Services Director (San Luis Obispo City Manager) or the Deputy Emergency Services Director (Assistant City Manager) determines that the disaster has entered into a recovery phase, the command staff should develop a formal demobilization plan. Consideration should also be given to assigning appropriate departments to conduct short term recovery operations (e.g., debris removal, restoration of critical facilities, utilities and communications, and tending to the needs of the homeless and displaced, etc.) The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center should be downgraded as an Emergency Operations Center. The Emergency Operations Center will then become a Recovery Operations Center (ROC). It is desirable to attempt to restore departments to their normal working routine and environment as soon as possible. The Unified Command Staff, as well as other City of San Luis Obispo departments, will be heavily involved in short and long-term recovery operations. C. Final Report and Activity Log All department heads from the City of San Luis Obispo departments involved in the fire response will be required to complete a narrative report and a master activity log. The narrative report briefly describes the primary responsibility, the protective action missions performed and the total staff hours of involvement by the agency during the emergency phase of the fire. The master activity log documents names and times of agency personnel involved in a mission, equipment and supplies used, and any contracts with a private vendor to support emergency operations. Most of this information can be extrapolated from individual activity logs used by team leaders during the emergency (ICS 214, Emergency Operations Center messages, Emergency Operations Center activity logs). A copy of the narrative report and activity logs should be forwarded to the Plans Section as soon as possible and will be part of the official record of the fire disaster. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 15 of 16 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption This is the official San Luis Obispo City Plan for Responding to a fire occurring in, or threatening, the City of San Luis Obispo. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below. B. Purpose The purpose of this Plan is to establish the City of San Luis Obispo's response organization, command authority, responsibilities, functions and interactions required to mitigate the effects of a fire affecting the City of San Luis Obispo. The priority of emergency response to a damaging event shall be to minimize loss of life and property. The Plan is designed to unify all response departments under the Incident Command System (ICS) in order to best utilize joint resources and more effectively minimize damage to life and property caused by the effects of a fire. C. Authorities See the Plan Summary for a listing of all authorities and references. D. Scope 1. Relationship with Other Plans This Plan, a component of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan and is primarily intended to serve as a stand-alone Fire Response Plan. Procedures within this Plan address emergency response and short-term recovery. The City of San Luis Obispo Earthquake Plan is compatible with federal, county and state emergency response plans. Should this type of event come about as the result of another disaster, that Disaster Plan will supersede this Plan. 2. Jurisdictional Factors This plan encompasses the City of San Luis Obispo jurisdictional limits of the City of San Luis Obispo. Copies of this Plan have been sent to the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Management, incorporated cities, San Luis Obispo Unified School District, and locally based federal, state and military institutions for informational and coordination purposes. City of San Luis Obispo Annex E Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Fire __________________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 16 of 16 E. Revision Page This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, the pages, the date the revision was posted, and the name of the person posting the revision. Revision # Revision Title Page Number Revised Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Annex F Developed for: Deanna Cantrell Police Chief City of San Luis Obispo Police Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Prepared by: David L. Mathe Disaster Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 2 of 18 FORWARD Annex F, the City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event Emergency Management Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism- Active Shooter Event. Response measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be charged with coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standardized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the emergency organization and the emergency management system for response to a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event, the Police Chief will assume the position of Unified Incident Commander. If the Police Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alte rnates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo's position as Incident Commander. No. 1 – The On-Duty Senior Law Enforcement No. 2 – On-Duty Police Officer/Battalion Fire Chief or Deputy Fire Chief No. 3 – The On-Duty highest ranking Police Officer or Fire Officer The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority. Deanna Cantrell Police Chief City of San Luis Obispo Police Department City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 3 of 18 Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event Table of Contents Section Page Forward 2 Table of Contents 3 I. Essentials 5 A. Definition 5 B. Initiating Event 5 C. Plan Activation 5 D. Initial Alerting 5 II. Response 6 A. Emergency Operations Center Locations 6 B. Emergency Operations Center-Levels of Activation 6 C. Emergency Response Levels 7 D. Situation Awareness Reporting 7 E. Situation Reporting Zones 8 F. Situation Reporting Responsibilities 8 G. San Luis Obispo County Resources 9 III. Incident Support A. Response to Families and Victims B. Reunification C. Family and Victim Support IV. Hazard Assessment 9 A. Hazard Assessment 9 V. Potential Impacts 9 1. Leadership 10 2. Situation Reporting 10 3. Multiple Casualties 10 4. Fires 10 5. Evacuations 10 6. Utility Disruptions 11 7. Effects on Transportation Systems 11 8. Communication Disruptions 11 9. Emergency Public Information 11 10. Security 11 City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 4 of 18 VI. Emergency Recovery 12 A. Re-entry 12 B. Demobilization 12 C. Final Report and Activity Log 12 VII. Plan Administration 13 A. Plan Adoption 13 B. Purpose 13 C. Authorities 13 D. Scope 13 E. Revision Page 14 City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 5 of 18 I. Essentials High density event-oriented populations occur at various times throughout the year in the City of San Luis Obispo. The prospect of a large concentration of individuals who are of a mindset to cause a civil disturbance is a real possibility. The threat of a civil disturbance from the local population is a possibility. The handling of any civil disturbance-terrorism-active shooter is very delicate in nature. Actions in response to a civil disturbance should attempt to prevent an escalation of the situation and to protect people and property. Constantly evaluate the situation and respond at a level necessary to control or mitigate confrontations. A. Definitions Civil Disturbance According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), civil disturbance is "a civil unrest activity such as a demonstration, riot, or strike that disrupts a community and requires intervention to maintain public safety." Civil disturbance or unrest can cause a variety of subsequent issues such as violence and assault, disorderly conduct, vandalism, or larceny. Terrorism FEMA definition of Terrorism: “Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom.” High density event-oriented populations occur at various times throughout the year in the City of San Luis Obispo. Individuals who are of a mindset to cause a terrorist event are a real possibility. The threat of a terrorist event from the local population is a possibility. Active Shooter The frequency of active shooter incidents has increased in recent years, and these incidents have affected numerous places where citizens congregate, such as schools, workplaces, places of worship, shopping malls, public meetings, and movie theaters. An active shooter is an individual or individuals actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people. There is no pattern or method to the selection of victims. Active shooter situations are dynamic and quickly evolve. B. Initiating Event A Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event is the initiating event that alerts the public the City of San Luis Obispo. The focal point for reporting these types of events is the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center. C. Plan Activation The policy of the City of San Luis Obispo that a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event, as referenced in this Plan, in the judgment of the City Manager, Police Chief, Fire Chief, or their designee, City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 6 of 18 warrants activation of this plan. If damage is confirmed and brought to the attention of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center, contact with the Unified Incident Commander (or authorized alternate) should be attempted. If contact is possible, the Unified Incident Commander or alternate would be advised of the situation, including initial damage reports. If contact with the Unified Incident Commander or any authorized alternate cannot be made, the on-duty highest ranking Police Officer or the Deputy Chief or on Duty Battalion Chief ay recommend Plan activation. D. Initial Alerting Upon Plan activation, the San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications will notify City departments of Plan and Emergency Operations Center activation. EOC Mobilization instructions are as follows: The on-duty dispatchers (with the assistance of on-duty support staff) will: Notify the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Alert all off-duty police and fire personnel and have them report to assigned work areas. Poll police and fire units and stations for damage assessment and available resources. Alert on-duty police and fire units and instruct them to begin Situation Reporting in the Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ). II. Response A. Emergency Operations Center Locations The following are the EOC locations for an emergency event. (Note: These locations may be adjusted or changed depending on the specific circumstances of the event). EMERGENCY OPEATIONS CENTER (EOC) Primary: San Luis Obispo City Fire Department 2160 Santa Barbara Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Secondary: Ludwick Community Center 864 Santa Rosa Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 B. Emergency Operations Center – Levels of Activation City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 7 of 18 The number of City staff at the EOC will depend on the level of activation. The person authorizing the activation of the EOC will determine the Level of Activation. The Emergency Services Director or Deputy Emergency Services Director may change the activation level throughout the emergency as needed. The levels of activation are: EOC LEVEL 1 A major disaster wherein local resources are overwhelmed. State and/or federal resources are required. A local emergency and a state of emergency will be proclaimed. A Presidential Declaration of Emergency or major disaster will be requested. The EOC will be staffed to the highest number of personnel possible or necessary. EOC LEVEL 2 A moderate to severe emergency wherein local resources are not adequate and mutual aid may be required on a regional or even statewide basis. A local emergency will be proclaimed, and a state of emergency might be proclaimed. The EOC will be moderately staffed. EOC LEVEL 3 A minor to moderate incident wherein local resources are adequate and available. A local emergency may or may not be declared. The EOC will be minimally staffed. Note: Upon activation of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Operations Center, contact will be established with the County of San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services. C. Emergency Response Levels Emergency response for a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event is broken down into three levels: Level 1, Severe Emergency: Total recall of all off-duty police, fire department personnel, and request the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Level 2, Escalating Emergency: Increased number of incidents due to a Civil Disturbance- Terrorism-Active Shooter Event. On-duty crews cannot keep up with calls. The incident can be handled by calling out all off-duty Police Department employees and with the assistance on-duty fire and police units. Level 3, Non-Emergency: Always in effect day-to-day routine operations. No excessive incident loads. On-duty crews can handle all calls. City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 8 of 18 D. Situation Awareness Reporting 1. General The priority upon plan activation is situation reporting: the process of receiving a complete and comprehensive picture of the damages caused by the event. Immediately after a Civil Disturbance- Terrorism-Active Shooter Event, situation reporting may be minimal. It is recognized that complete damage intelligence may take several hours to get a complete and stable citywide assessment. Continuing situation reporting is critically important and is the foundation on which EOC/field actions are based every effort must be made to immediately initiate a field survey within a Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ) and to report that information to the City of San Luis Obispo EOC as soon as possible. Situation Reports may become available from the other sources, i.e.: General Public News and Social Media San Luis Obispo County Emergency Communications Center San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services City of San Luis Obispo Radio equipped field units Caltrans California Highway Patrol SEMPRA (formerly known as Southern California Gas Company) San Luis Coastal Unified School District Pacific Gas and Electric (PG & E) Ares Medical Centers The individual field Situation Reporting Groups within the Operations Section will conduct a field survey of an area or Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ). Early reports may include the following:  Rescue needs (estimated number trapped)  Serious mass injuries (estimated number)  Dead (estimated number)  Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event damages  Any other critical emergency or situation observed. E. Situation Reporting Zones In the event of an event, the City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into four Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ’s). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 9 of 18 of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no damage occurs within a SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. F. Situation Zone Responsibilities DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY Police Department Citywide primary survey for all damages Fire Department Citywide survey for damage, rescue, injuries and fire Public Works Citywide survey for streets, facilities and, parks damage Survey for water, wastewater, electric, broadband and solid waste damages Information Technology Citywide survey for communication damage Community Development Citywide survey of critical facilities for adverse weather related damage, structural damage, and posting of unsafe buildings Utilities Citywide survey of freshwater and waste disposal systems PG & E Utilities Survey for condition of their transmission lines San Luis Coastal Unified School District Survey for condition of their facility and personnel Caltrans Jurisdictional survey for State highways G. San Luis Obispo County Resources The Office of Emergency Services (OES) coordinates all requests for assistance from San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at 805.781.1144. The American Red Cross works together with the Care and Shelter Branch to identify and establish evacuation and general population shelter sites. In most cases the Care and Shelter Branch provides a supporting role to the American Red Cross. III. Incident Support Once the incident has been stabilized and is no longer a threat, and Law Enforcement have evacuated the wounded, human resources and/or leadershipt should engage in post-event assessments. Including but not limited to: City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 10 of 18 accounting for all individuals at one or more designated assembly points to determine who, if anyone, is missing or potentially injured. coordinating with first responders to account for any occupants who were not evacuated. determining the best methods for notifying families of individuals affected by the active shooter, including notification of any casualties in coordination with Law Enforcement. assessing the psychological state of individuals at the scene and referring them to health care specialists accordingly. Response to Victims and Families Victim and family support is a critical component to ensuring a successful overall response to a critical incident. It is important to ensure the response is coordinated through each phase including the immediate response, transition process, and post-crisis support in a way that integrates into the investigative and operational response. Coordination with local resources is critical to ensure a smooth provision of services throughout the longevity of the event. Account and adjust to meet the needs of the victim/family and the dynamics of the situation. Some considerations include (but are not limited to): information victim identification family response management teams communications Resource coordination Reunification Where the immediate reunification of loved ones is not possible, providing family members with timely, accurate, and relevant information is paramount. Having family members wait for long periods of time for information about their loved ones not only adds to their stress and frustration, but can also escalate the emotions of the entire group. When families are reunited, it is critical that there are child release processes in place where minors might be involved (e.g., childcare or discharged patients) to ensure that no child is released to an unauthorized person, even if that person is well-meaning. Essential steps to help establish trust and provide family members with a sense of control can be accomplished by identifying a safe location separate from distractions and/or media and the general City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 11 of 18 public, but close enough to allow family members to feel connected in proximity to their children/loved ones; scheduling periodic updates even if no additional information is available being prepared to speak with family members about what to expect when reunited with their loved ones. ensuring effective communication with those who have language barriers or need other accommodations, such as American Sign Language interpreters for deaf or hard of hearing family members When reunification is not possible because an individual is missing, injured, or killed, how and when this information is provided to families is critical. Before an emergency, it must determined how, when, and by whom family members/representatives will be informed if their loved one is missing or has been injured or killed. Law Enforcement typically takes the lead on death notifications related to criminal activity. This will ensure that families and loved ones receive accurate and timely information in a compassionate way. While Law Enforcement and medical examiner procedures must be followed, families should receive accurate information as soon as possible. In cases where an individual has been killed, describe the importance of processing the scene for forensic, investigative purposes and to ensure accurate identification of victims. It is best to avoid making promises that cannot be kept with regard to timing of identification and release of victims’ remains. Crisis responders should be on hand to immediately assist family members. Victim and Family Support Victims and their families need the availability of a support system. Victim identification is an opportunity for Law Enforcement to interact in a compassionate way with victims, families. Death notification is a major interaction between the family members and Law Enforcement, as well as the management of personal effects, both evidentiary and non-evidentiary. Identifying victims is a predictable challenge. An incident can result in injured, missing/deceased, walking wounded, and eyewitnesses who may be identified as victims. The victim identification process is likely to be drawn out when victim remains are disfigured, severely damaged, or fragmented. Victim populations tend to be diverse, which creates an opportunity to plan for multi-cultural issues, language barriers, foreign citizens, injured victims and other special populations and those citizens with Functional and Access Needs. Death notification should be done in teams (Law Enforcement and victim services provider). How these issues and death notification are handled has a major impact on families, as well as their relationship to officials and their perception of responding agencies. Management of victim/family response is a challenge. The National Transportation Safety Board estimates City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 12 of 18 that an average of eight to twelve family members for each missing victim will respond to the incident location. Victims and families will begin asking about personal belongings. For the families of the deceased these items assume special significance as they are among the last things their loved ones touched and help maintain a physical connection when it is needed most. The needs of victims and the responsibilities for addressing these needs develop along a continuum to include: the immediate aftermath identifying victims and providing initial information and support transition to services that help stabilize victims and families long-term provision of information and support associated with long investigations and possible prosecutions IV. Hazard Assessment The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identification and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. General Agency Responsibilities Listed below are the potential threats and impact of situations resulting from a Civil Disturbance- Terrorism-Active Shooter Event. The exact circumstances of the event may dictate some flexibility and adjustments. A. Hazard Assessment 1. Potential Threats The threat to the public, Law E nf orcement and safety personnel can be severe and bold in nature. Securing of essential facilities and services is necessary. 2. Potential Impacts Damage possibilities range from the loss of life, multiple casualties, significant property damage from fire and looting, or the loss of infrastructure (electric and water systems). Looting and fires can take place as a res ult of perceived or actual non-intervention by authorities and could take place in both commercial and residential areas of the City of San Luis Obispo. The setting of fires is a common occurrence in these types of events. Major structure fires or conflagrations are a real threat as fire suppression efforts will often be hindered V. Potential Impacts The following potential situations that may be caused as a result of a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 13 of 18 Shooter Event impacting this City of San Luis Obispo include: 1. Leadership 2. Situation Reporting 3. Multiple Casualties 4. Fires 5. Evacuation 6. Utility Disruptions 7. Effects on Transportation Systems 8. Communication Disruptions 9. Emergency Public Information 10. Security These emergencies are discussed in general and are a basis for response to a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism- Active Shooter Event. This Plan does not presume to predict the full range and depth of Civil Disturbance- Terrorism-Active Shooter Event consequences. It does, however, attempt to reflect the most accurate estimate of the nature of emergencies or problems resulting from a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event occurring in or threatening the City of San Luis Obispo. 1. Leadership: The strain on local government and its emergency response organization to command and coordinate the response to a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event could be immediate, severe, and overwhelming. During a large event of this type, the City of San Luis Obispo and County of San Luis Obispo may establish their command post together. 2. Situation Reporting: A Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event may trigger many different types of emergencies and damages simultaneously over a widespread area. An overall assessment and prioritization of emergencies/hazards through a centralized means of situation reporting will be one of the first critical actions. On-duty radio-equipped public safety and public services units may be the only means available to provide an initial survey of field areas and report damage information back to the City of San Luis Obispo’s Communications Center Due to several factors (massive damage, limited personnel, transportation disruptions, communications overload, etc.), a complete situation reporting picture may take several hours to several days. 3. Multiple Casualties: See Annex C, Multiple Casualty Incident of this Plan for additional information. City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 14 of 18 4. Fires: Refer to Annex E, Fire Annex for additional information. 5. Evacuation: Threatened areas of the City of San Luis Obispo may require evacuation to minimize injury and loss of life, and to allow emergency responders to operate without interference. Voluntary evacuation may be hampered due to communications problems, the loss of good judgment by some segments of the public, and the tendency of some people to want to stay and defend their homes. The Unified Command will need to balance several factors when developing evacuation plans: a) Severity of threat b) Time of day c) Type of threat d) Availability of emergency workers 6. Utility Disruptions: Loss of utilities would primarily be from some sort of disruption of the main delivery systems which could be extensive. 7. Effects on Transportation Systems: A Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event could disrupt normal transportation systems causing severe traffic management problems as well as delays to response, evacuation and logistical support. 8. Communication Disruptions: A Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event may damage some portions of the telephone system in the immediate area or be regional in nature. Telephone equipment, both hard wired and cell sites, could be adversely affected primarily by overloading and complicated by physical damage. Effective radio communications may require the augmentation of Amateur Emergency Radio Services personnel and the use of "car to car" relay systems. In the absence of emergency power to some agency base stations, portable radios may be the only available means of radio communications. 9. Emergency Public Information: City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 15 of 18 During a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event, the public will need basic emergency public information. This information will be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo's Public Information Officer via: Emergency Broadcast Messages over the Emergency Alerting System (EAS) Social Media AM/FM Radio Stations Local Network Television 10. Security: • Looting can be anticipated to be a major problem or consideration requiring security. • Security to control access into and out of the most highly damaged areas will be a major consideration for Law Enforcement departments. VI. Recovery City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 16 of 18 The City of San Luis Obispo has a Recovery Plan, in the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. The following points are a short overview of items covered in more detail in that document. A. Re-Entry During transition into a recovery phase, areas affected by the Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event should be inspected to determine if they are safe for public re-entry. Based on joint concurrence by the Unified Command Staff, state or federal representatives, re-entry will be authorized, and a Public Information message to that effect will be issued. B. Demobilization When response departments are nearing completion of the last remaining life-safety Protective Action Missions, and when the Emergency Services Director (San Luis Obispo City Manager) or the Deputy Director of Emergency Services (Assistant City Manager) determines that the disaster has entered into a recovery phase, the command staff should develop a formal demobilization plan. Consideration should also be given to assigning appropriate departments to conduct short term recovery operations (e.g., debris removal, restoration of critical facilities, utilities and communications, and tending to the needs of the displaced, etc.) The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center should be downgraded as an Emergency Operations Center. The Emergency Operations Center will then become a Recovery Operations Center (ROC). It is desirable to attempt to restore departments to their normal working routine and environment as soon as possible. The Unified Command Staff, as well as other City of San Luis Obispo departments, will be heavily involved in short and long-term recovery operations. C. Final Report and Activity Log All department heads from the City of San Luis Obispo departments involved in the Civil Disturbance- Terrorism-Active Shooter Event response will be required to complete a narrative report and a master activity log. The narrative report briefly describes the primary responsibility, the protective action missions performed and the total staff hours of involvement by the agency during the emergency phase of the Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event. The master activity log documents names and times of agency personnel involved in a mission, equipment and supplies used, and any contracts with a private vendor to support emergency operations. Most of this information can be extrapolated from individual activity logs used by team leaders during the emergency (ICS 214, EOC messages, EOC activity logs). A copy of the narrative report and activity logs should be forwarded to the Plans Section as soon as possible and will be part of the official record of the Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event disaster. VII. Plan Administration City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 17 of 18 A. Plan Adoption This is the official San Luis Obispo City Plan for Responding to a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event occurring in, or threatening, the City of San Luis Obispo. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below. B. Purpose The purpose of this Plan is to establish the City of San Luis Obispo's response organization, command authority, responsibilities, functions and interactions required to mitigate the effects of a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event affecting the City of San Luis Obispo. The priority of emergency response to these types of events shall be to minimize loss of life and property. The Plan is designed to unify all response departments under the Incident Command System (ICS) in order to best utilize joint resources and more effectively minimize damage to life and property caused by the effects of a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event. C. Authorities See the Basic Plan, for a listing of all authorities and references. D. Scope 1. Relationship with Other Plans This Plan is primarily intended to serve as a stand-alone response Plan for all effects associated with a Civil Disturbance-Terrorism-Active Shooter Event. Procedures within this Plan solely address emergency response and short-term recovery. The Plan is compatible with other city, county and state emergency response plans. 2. Jurisdictional Factors This plan encompasses the jurisdictional limits of the City of San Luis Obispo. Copies of this Plan have been sent to the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Management, incorporated cities, San Luis Obispo Unified School District, and locally based federal, state and military institutions for informational and coordination purposes. E. Revision Page City of San Luis Obispo Civil Disturbance -Terrorism-Active Shooter Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Annex F For Official Use Only Page 18 of 18 This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, revision title, page number revised date the revision was posted and the name of the person posting the revision. The format for numbering revisions shall be a sequential number followed by the last two digits of the current calendar year (e.g., #1-15, #2-15, and so on). New sequential revision numbers will begin each January 1. Revision # Revision Title Page Number Revised Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Annex G Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Developed by: David L. Mathe Emergency Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA FORWARD Annex G, City of San Luis Obispo Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to a Nuclear Power Plant event. Preparedness measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if a Nuclear Power Plant event impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be responsible for coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standardized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the emergency organization and the emergency management system for response to a Nuclear Power Plant event impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of a Nuclear Power Plant Incident, the Fire Chief will assume the position of Unified Incident Commander. In the event the Fire Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alternates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo's position as Incident Commander. No. 1 – The Deputy Fire Chief or On Battalion Fire Chief No. 2 – The On-Duty Police/Fire Person as appointed by the Fire or Police Chief No. 3 – The On-Duty highest ranking Fire Officer or Police Officer The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director Plan Authentication This Plan was developed by the County of San Luis Obispo and has been approved. This plan is hereby incorporated as the City of San Luis Obispo procedure to dealing with Nuclear Power Plant emergencies impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority during an emergency. _______________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department Date: SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY/CITIES NUCLEAR POWER PLANT EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN REVISION DATE: JANUARY 2014 San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES REVISION PAGE REVISION DATE Original Document August 1982 Rev. 1 December 1982 Rev. 2 January 1984 Rev. 3 March 1985 Rev. 4 March 1986 Rev. 5 July 1987 Rev. 6 October 1988 Rev. 7 February 1990 Rev. 8 March 1991 Rev. 9 July 1991 Rev. 10 August 1994 Rev. 11 October 2006 Administrative Revision November 2009 Administrative Revision, Rev. 12 July 2010 Administrative Revision, Rev. 13 August 2012 Administrative Rev. 14 January 2014 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 ii FOREWORD This San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan (NPP ERP) outlines the authorities, concepts, and operating procedures for responding to potential radiological emergency situations in San Luis Obispo County that may occur at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. The Plan's objectives are to facilitate the command and control of offsite (the term “offsite” is a standard emergency management term that references the area near a nuclear power plant but outside the boundaries of the plant itself) radiological emergency operations and to enhance the County's preparedness in initiating protective actions for the general public in the event of radiation releases at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. Emergency procedures to manage radiological emergencies at the Power Plant site itself are prepared by the Plant operator and are covered in a separate Emergency Plan. 1 The Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan is a component of the San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). The EOP is the county’s master emergency plan and provides authorities and guidance to the overall emergency management and planning system for the county. Authorities and procedures outlined in the EOP also carry over to the NPP Emergency Response Plan. The Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan itself is actually made up of three parts: Part One is the Administrative Plan which provides an overview of the potential hazards from a nuclear power plant, describes the emergency planning process, and provides information on how the overall emergency management system related to nuclear power plant response preparedness works. Part Two is no longer needed as it contained reference material that is now contained and updated in the various Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) in Part Three. Part Three is actually made up of about between fifty and sixty separate “Standard Operating Procedures” (SOPs) which provide emergency response guidelines for various agencies or other entities that would have a role in responding to emergency response related to Diablo Canyon. These SOPs are essentially used as standalone response procedures for agencies such as schools, California Highway Patrol, Sheriff’s Department, County Fire and many other entities with a role in a Diablo Canyon emergency response. In addition to providing guidance for emergency response to a nuclear power plant incident, both the County Emergency Operations Plan and the NPP ERP provide for “continuity of operations” within emergency management. Individuals fulfilling an emergency response position may delegate authority to another individual of choice, therefore granting the designee equal 1Diablo Canyon Power Plant Unit 1 & 2 Emergency Plan, Revision 4, September 2001, with current updated sections. Pacific Gas and Electric Company Nuclear Power Generation. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 iii responsibility and authority. This ensures a continuing line of oversight and authority during any emergency response. While this emergency plan is intended for use by response personnel, nuclear power plant preparedness and related information for the public can be found in the San Luis Obispo County edition of the YP telephone book or online at the County Office of Emergency Services Web site, which can be accessed through the County Web site at http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/oes. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Administrative Plan January 2014 PLAN ADOPTION This Plan is the official San Luis Obispo County/Cities Emergency Response Plan for responding to a radiological emergency at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below: ------------------------------------------------------------ Chairperson San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors ----------------------------- Date iv San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 v DISTRIBUTION COPY QUANTITY LOCATION DATE Original 1 OES Office File Working Copy 1 OES Office File EOC 5 Command Room*, Operations Section, Plans Section, EOC File Cabinet*, Joint Information Center County Depts. 5 Supervisors, Each District 1 County Administrator 1 Assistant County Administrator 5 Office of Emergency Services* 1 County Agricultural Commissioner 1 Air Pollution Control District 1 County Counsel 1 County Public Works 1 Environmental Health Director 1 County Health Agency Administrator 1 County Health Officer 1 Planning Department 1 County Sheriff 1 Patrol Commander 1 Sheriff Substation, North 1 Sheriff Substation, South 1 Sheriff Substation, Coast 1 County Fire, Chief 1 County Fire, ECC 1 General Services 1 Human Resources 1 Social Services San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 vi 1 Information Technology Dept 1 Comm Shop Cities 1 City of Arroyo Grande 1 City of Atascadero 1 City of Grover Beach 1 City of Guadalupe 1 City of Morro Bay 1 City of Paso Robles 1 City of Pismo Beach 1 City of San Luis Obispo 1 City of Santa Maria 1 Police Department, Arroyo Grande 1 Police Department, Atascadero 1 Police Department, Grover Beach 1 Police Department, Morro Bay 1 Police Department, Paso Robles 1 Police Department, Pismo Beach 1 Police Department, San Luis Obispo 1 Fire Department, Atascadero 1 Fire Department, Morro Bay 1 Fire Department, Paso Robles 1 Fire Department, San Luis Obispo 1 Five Cities Fire Authority 1 Fire Department, Cayucos Other Counties 1 Santa Barbara County 1 Monterey County 1 Kern County Hospitals 1 Arroyo Grande Community Hospital San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 vii 1 Atascadero State Hospital 1 French Hospital 1 Sierra Vista Regional Med Center 1 Twin Cities Community Hospital Schools 1 County Office of Education 1 Cuesta College 1 San Luis Coastal USD 1 Cayucos Elementary School District 1 Lucia Mar USD State Agencies 1 Cal Trans, District 5 Ops and Maintenance Director 1 Cal Trans, District 5, Traffic Management Center 1 California Highway Patrol, Coastal 1 California Highway Patrol, SLO 1 California Highway Patrol, Santa Maria 1 California Highway Patrol, Templeton 1 California Men’s Colony 1 Cal OES, Sacramento 1 Cal OES, Southern Region, Los Alamitos 1 Cal Poly, Office of Vice President for Admin and Finance 1 California Dept of Public Health, Environmental Mgmt Branch, Sacramento 1 State Dept of Parks and Rec, SLO Coast Area Office 1 State Dept of Parks and Rec, Oceano Dunes State Vehicle Rec Area 1 Paso Robles Event Center, Mid State Fair Grounds Military Agencies 1 Camp Roberts, Commanding Officer 1 Camp San Luis Obispo, Commanding Officer San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 viii 1 US Coast Guard, 11th District, Alameda, Commanding Officer 1 US Coast Guard Station, Morro Bay, Officer in Charge 1 US Coast Guard, Marine Safety Officer, Los Angeles/Long Beach, Commanding Officer Federal Agencies 2 FEMA, Oakland 1 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Region IV, Arlington, TX 1 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Head Quarters, Local Assistance Other Agencies 1 San Luis Ambulance 1 San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority (SLORTA) 1 Port San Luis Harbor District 1 American Red Cross (SLO Chapter) 1 National Weather Services, Los Angeles/Oxnard Libraries 1 California Polytechnic State University Library, SLO 1 San Luis County Library, SLO Utilities 1 PG&E DCPP, Tech Support Center 1 PG&E DCPP, Emergency Operations Facility 1 PG&E DCPP, Plant Library 1 PG&E DCPP, Emergency Planning 1 PG&E, San Francisco 1 PG&E, Los Padres District Office, SLO 1 YP Telephone Service, SLO 1 Southern California Gas, SLO * Distribution at these locations includes a copy of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant Development of Evacuation Times Estimate San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 ix TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ............................ ii PLAN ORGANIZATION ......................................................................................................... 1 PART 1 – SECTIONS ............................................................................................................... 2 SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................. 3 1. PURPOSE ........................................................................................................................... 3 2. OBJECTIVES ..................................................................................................................... 3 3. COORDINATION WITH OTHER PLANS AND PROCEDURES ..................................... 4 4. AUTHORITIES .................................................................................................................. 5 5. REFERENCES .................................................................................................................... 7 6. AGREEMENTS .................................................................................................................. 7 SECTION 2 - HAZARD ASSESSMENT ................................................................................. 9 1. SITUATION ....................................................................................................................... 9 2. RADIATION AND HAZARDS .......................................................................................... 9 3. EXPOSURE CRITERIA ................................................................................................... 11 SECTION 3 - PLANNING BASIS .......................................................................................... 16 1. EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONES ................................................................................ 16 2. METEOROLOGY............................................................................................................. 18 3. PROTECTIVE ACTIONS ................................................................................................. 18 4. PROTECTIVE ACTIONS FOR EMERGENCY WORKERS ............................................ 20 5. PROTECTIVE ACTIONS RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FOOD COMMODITIES, LIVESTOCK, ETC ................................................................................................................... 21 6. EVACUATION ROUTES, CONCEPTS, AND ASSUMPTIONS ..................................... 22 7. EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATES .............................................................................. 24 8. EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVEL (ECL) .......................................................... 24 9. TIME FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH RELEASE ......................................................... 28 10. EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE ........................................................................................ 28 11. TSUNAMI RESPONSE ................................................................................................. 30 SECTION 4 – EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT .................................................................. 32 1. COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION ................................................................... 32 2. INTERAGENCY ORGANIZATION ................................................................................ 34 3. LINES OF AUTHORITY .................................................................................................. 36 4. COMMAND AND CONTROL ASSIGNMENTS ............................................................. 36 SECTION 5 – CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS ...................................................................... 38 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 x 1. INITIAL EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION (PLAN ACTIVATION CRITERIA) .............. 38 2. NOTIFICATION AND MOBILIZATION......................................................................... 39 3. INFORMATION ACQUISITION AND SITUATION REPORTING ................................ 40 4. PUBLIC ALERTING, NOTIFICATION, AND INFORMATION .................................... 43 5. PUBLIC PRECAUTIONARY AND PROTECTIVE ACTIONS........................................ 48 7. TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................. 53 8. NOTIFICATION OF CITY RESIDENTS ......................................................................... 54 9. HANDLING OF SPECIAL NEEDS OR FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY POPULATIONS 54 10. CONGREGATE CARE .................................................................................................. 55 11. EXPOSURE CONTROL, RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING, AND DECONTAMINATION ............................................................................................................ 55 12. EMERGENCY MEDICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH SUPPORT ................................... 57 13. INGESTION PATHWAY RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................................ 58 14. RECOVERY PHASE ..................................................................................................... 60 15. RECOVERY INTERAGENCY COORDINATION GROUP (RICG) ............................. 62 SECTION 6 - EMERGENCY RESOURCES ........................................................................ 65 1. EMERGENCY FACILITIES ............................................................................................ 65 2. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ............................................................... 66 3. RESOURCE AGREEMENTS ........................................................................................... 68 4. OTHER RESOURCES ...................................................................................................... 68 SECTION 7 - PROGRAM MAINTENANCE........................................................................ 69 1. PLAN AND PROCEDURE MAINTENANCE .................................................................. 69 2. EMERGENCY RESOURCE MAINTENANCE ................................................................ 70 3. TRAINING ....................................................................................................................... 72 4. EXERCISES AND DRILLS .............................................................................................. 78 5. PUBLIC EDUCATION ..................................................................................................... 80 PART 2 – ATTACHMENTS, FIGURES AND TABLES LIST ............................................ 86 ATTACHMENT 1.1: GLOSSARY ........................................................................................... 88 ATTACHMENT 1.2: ACRONYMS ......................................................................................... 95 ATTACHMENT 2: NUREG CROSSWALK .......................................................................... 100 FIGURE 2.1: REGIONAL LOCATION MAP ........................................................................ 105 FIGURE 3.1.1: NRC-DEFINED EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONES (EPZ) ........................ 106 FIGURE 3.1.2: NRC-DEFINED PROTECTIVE ACTION ZONE AND INGESTION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 xi PATHWAY ZONE (IPZ) ........................................................................................................ 107 FIGURE 3.2: STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEFINEDEMERGENCY PLANNING ZONE and PUBLIC EDUCATION ZONE ............................................................................................... 108 FIGURE 3.3: INGESTION PATHWAY ZONE MAP ............................................................. 109 FIGURE 3.4: WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION .................................................................... 110 FIGURE 3.5: MAJOR EVACUATION ROUTES ................................................................... 111 FIGURE 3.6: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES ................................................................... 112 FIGURE 3.7: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES FOR RECEPTION AND CONGREGATE CARE CENTERS ................................................................................................................... 125 FIGURE 3.8: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES PUBLIC SCHOOL RELOCATION CENTERS .............................................................................................................................. 126 FIGURE 3.9: GRAPHICAL DEPICTION OF KEY EVACUATION ...................................... 127 FIGURE 4.1.1: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION ................................................ 129 FIGURE 4.1.2: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – OPERATIONS SECTION ... 130 FIGURE 4.1.3: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – PLANS SECTION ............... 131 FIGURE 4.1.4: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – LOGISTICS SECTION ....... 132 FIGURE 4.1.5: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – FINANCE AND ADMINSTRATION SECTION .............................................................................................. 133 FIGURE 4.2: INTERAGENCY EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION ................................... 134 FIGURE 5.1: RADIOLOGICAL PLUME ASSESSMENT ORGANIZATION ....................... 135 FIGURE 5.2: EVACUATION ROUTE FROM DIABLO CANYON POWER PLANT ........... 136 TABLE 2.1: RELATIONSHIP OF WHOLE BODY DOSE TO HEALTH EFFECTS ............. 137 TABLE 2.2: RADIATION EXPOSURE CRITERIA ............................................................... 138 TABLE 3.1: EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONE DESCRIPTIONS PROTECTIVE ACTION ZONES (PAZ) ........................................................................................................................ 139 TABLE 3.2.1: EPZ PERMANENT RESIDENT POPULATION ............................................. 142 TABLE 3.2.2: PERMANENT RESIDENT VEHCILES BY PAZ ........................................... 143 TABLE 3.3.1: SUMMARY OF POPULATION DEMAND .................................................... 144 TABLE 3.3.2: SUMMARY OF VEHICLE DEMAND ............................................................ 145 TABLE 3.4: RECOMMENDED PROTECTIVE ACTIONS ................................................... 146 TABLE 3.5.1: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 90 PERCENT OF POPULATION................................................................................................ 147 TABLE 3.5.2: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 100 PERCENT OF POPULATION ......................................................................................... 150 TABLE 3.6: EVACUATION TIMES STUDY EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE ......................... 153 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 xii TABLE 3.7: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS AT THE FOUR EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVELS ................................................................................................................................. 154 TABLE 3.7: GUIDANCE ON INITIATION AND DURATION OF RELEASE ..................... 158 TABLE 7.3-1: TRAINING MATRIX ..................................................................................... 159 TABLE 7.3-2: SOP NUMERICAL LISTINGS ....................................................................... 160 TABLE 7.3-3: BLOCK DIAGRAM CROSS REFERENCE .................................................... 162 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 1 PLAN ORGANIZATION PART ONE, THE ADMINISTRATIVE PLAN This part of the Plan is intended as an introduction and overview. It includes the overall planning goals, authorities, glossary, hazard assessments, and a concept of operations section which describes in broad terms the county/cities emergency response to an emergency declared at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. PART TWO, DELETED PART THREE, STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs) This part of the Plan includes procedures describing emergency response at an individual agency or department level, including individual duties for specific emergency positions. The SOPs provide more detailed guidance for the emergency worker to implement the objectives of the Administrative Plan. The SOPs are essentially individual response procedures used by local and state agencies responding to a Diablo Canyon emergency. 2 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 PART 1 – SECTIONS SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION SECTION 2 HAZARD ASSESSMENT SECTION 3 PLANNING BASICS SECTION 4 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SECTION 5 CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS SECTION 6 EMERGENCY RESOURCES SECTION 7 PROGRAM MAINTENANCE 3 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 1, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION 1. PURPOSE The purpose of the Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan is to establish organizational responses and responsibilities for San Luis Obispo County and Cities in the event of a radiological accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). This Plan prescribes the actions required to preclude or to minimize radiation exposure to the general public outside the plant site boundary. In addition, the Plan: ● Identifies the scope of potential hazards which form a basis for planning. ● Identifies authorities and assigns responsibilities for both emergency planning and emergency response activities. ● Establishes the county's official policy in response to an emergency. ● Establishes the County Emergency Organization for handling an emergency, and ● Identifies and incorporates those provisions which must be planned for in advance in order to effectively respond to an emergency. 2. OBJECTIVES This Plan is designed to meet the following specific objectives: 2.1 To identify the county organization responsible for the direction and control of nuclear power plant emergency response plan operations. 2.2 To describe the necessary pre-emergency preparations, concept of operations, organization, protective measures, and supporting systems to implement the Plan. 2.3 To establish the framework for implementing the California Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) and National Incident Management System (NIMS) for San Luis Obispo County. SEMS is intended to facilitate multi-agency and multi-jurisdictional coordination, particularly between San Luis Obispo County and other local governments, including special districts and state and federal agencies, in emergency operations. 2.4 To provide a basis for incorporating nongovernmental agencies and organizations who have resources necessary to meet foreseeable emergency requirements into the County Emergency Organization. 4 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 1, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 2.5 To describe the alert and notification systems and procedures used between County, State and Federal agencies, and with the plant manager or designee, of Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP), owned by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). 2.6 To describe the means and procedures for timely alert and notification of the population in the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) in the event that protective actions are or may become necessary. 2.7 To describe the criteria, means and procedures for implementing specific protective actions, such as sheltering or evacuation of the affected population within the Emergency Planning Zone. 2.8 To respond to specific information requests from Federal and State regulatory agencies such as Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), FEMA, and the California Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES). 2.9 To provide a basis on which county departments and local agencies can establish supporting plans, detailed standard operating procedures, and training programs necessary for the effective execution of emergency response activities. 3. COORDINATION WITH OTHER PLANS AND PROCEDURES Significant interfaces with other plans and procedures include the following: 3.1 The San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) which addresses the planned response to extraordinary emergency situations associated with natural disaster, technological incidents, and national security emergencies in or affecting San Luis Obispo County. 3.2 The State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan, which defines Federal, State and local responsibilities. In addition, departmental annexes such as the California Department of Public Health, Environmental Management Branch procedures document, lists specific tasks to be accomplished by the State in response to an accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. 3.3 Santa Barbara County and the City of Santa Maria will provide support to San Luis Obispo County in terms of added resources and hosting of evacuees. 3.4 The California National Guard (CNG) has prepared a plan for an emergency at Diablo Canyon. That plan contains three major points of coordination with the San Luis Obispo Plan: ● The operation of Camp San Luis in an emergency. ● The operation of Camp Roberts in an emergency. 5 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 1, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 ● The addition of staff support and equipment resources following the first day of an emergency. 3.5 Additional State agencies have developed emergency response plans in coordination with San Luis Obispo County including California Highway Patrol, California Department of Transportation and the CA State Parks. 3.6 The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Energy (DOE), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) may provide assistance to San Luis Obispo County, the State of California, and Diablo Canyon Power Plant based upon their emergency response plans and legislated responsibilities. Space is provided in the co-located DCPP/PG&E Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) and San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) for representatives of state and federal agencies and representatives from other agencies identified in the Plan to provide specific assistance. 3.7 The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for notifying vessels and establishing security and safety zones at sea. The U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Los Angeles/Long Beach (MSO LA/LB), located in Long Beach has authorized the Coast Guard to respond. 3.8 Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) operates the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, and is required by federal regulations to develop and implement emergency preparedness plans as a condition of facility operating licenses. The Diablo Canyon Power Plant facility plan addresses emergency measures necessary to mitigate the spectrum of postulated conventional and nuclear emergency accidents. Such measures include advising local governmental agencies of occurring or potential accidents which could have offsite consequences, and require actions within their jurisdiction for the protection of the population. 3.9 The San Luis Obispo County Emergency Alert System (EAS) Plan, designed in cooperation with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the National Weather Service (NWS) and the State of California Emergency Response Plan and provides direction and assistance with disseminating emergency information and instructions to the public. 4. AUTHORITIES 4.1 Federal: 4.1.1 Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 (Public Law 920, as amended). 4.1.2 Atomic Energy Act of 1954 4.1.3 Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act of 1988 (Public Law 93-288, as amended from time-to-time). 6 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 1, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 4.2 State: 4.2.1 California Emergency Services Act (Chapter 7 of Division 1 of Title 2 of the Government Code). 4.2.2 Agreement between the State of California and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), pursuant to Section 274 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. 4.2.3 California Health and Safety Code. Division 104, Part 9, Radiation 4.2.3.1 Control of Radioactive Contamination of the Environment (Division 104, Part 9 Chapter 5, Sections 144705-114780). 4.2.3.2 Transportation of Radioactive Materials (Division 104, Part 9 Chapter 5, Section 114815-114835). 4.2.3.3 Radiation Control Law (Division 104, Part 9 Chapter 8, Sections 114960-115273). 4.2.3.4 Radiation Protection Act of 1999, Section 114650 et seq. 4.2.4 California Code of Regulations, Title 17, Public Health Part I, Chapter 5, Subchapter 4, Radiation. 4.2.4.1 Registration of Sources of Radiation (Sections 30108 et seq.). 4.2.4.2 Licensing of Radioactive Materials (Sections 30170-30237). 4.2.4.3 Standards for Protection against Radiation (Sections 30250- 30358). 4.2.4.4 Transportation of Radioactive Materials (Section 30373). 4.2.4.5 Participation by Local Health Department (Sections 30385-30397). 4.2.5 California Master Mutual Aid Agreement, Article 11, Sections 8615-8619, California Government Code. 4.2.6 California Government Code 8610.5 concerning nuclear power plant emergency response planning fund. 4.3 Local: 7 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 1, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 4.3.1 County of San Luis Obispo Emergency Services Ordinance No. 1384, San Luis Obispo County Code, Chapter 2.80, Emergency Organization and Functions (including County of San Luis Obispo Resolution Establishing Continuity of Government in an Emergency, San Luis Obispo Code 2.80.140). 4.3.2 San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operation Plan. Current Version. 4.3.3 Participating cities emergency ordinances (Arroyo Grande, Atascadero, Grover Beach, Morro Bay, Paso Robles, Pismo Beach and San Luis Obispo). 4.3.4 California Master Mutual Aid Agreement, adopted by the County of San Luis Obispo December 4, 1950 5. REFERENCES 5.1 NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Federal Emergency Management Agency, November 1980, Revision 1. 5.2 Emergency Planning Zones for Serious Nuclear Power Plant Accidents, California Office of Emergency Services, November 1980. 5.3 State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 2008. 5.4 San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operations Plan 5.5 San Luis Obispo County Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan, 1976, and San Luis Obispo County Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Evacuation Plan, 1976. 5.6 Diablo Canyon Power Plant Units 1 and 2, Emergency Plan, Revision 4, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, September 2001. 5.7 State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan. 5.8 Diablo Canyon Development of Evacuation Times Estimate, KLD Engineering, P.C. November 2012. 6. AGREEMENTS A copy of the March 2004 contract for management, administrative and financial services between the County of San Luis Obispo and the San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority is on file with the County Clerk and the County Office of Emergency Services. Agreements with emergency medical providers are maintained by the utility as part of the 8 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 1, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Diablo Canyon Power Plant Emergency Plan and are also on file with County OES. Arrangements with school districts are contained in those agencies' approved and signed Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), which are updated annually and included in Part 3 of this Plan. The County does not require letters of agreements with each department and agency. The Standard Operating Procedures that are included in Part 3 of this plan serve as that agreement. 6.1 Memorandums of Understanding 6.1.1 School Districts (Buses) (County Office of Education SOP) 6.1.2 Medical (Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Agreements) 6.1.3 Ambulance (Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Agreements) 6.2 Mutual Aid State of California agreements with San Luis Obispo County include the "California Master Mutual Aid Agreement, Article 11, Sections 8615-8619, California Government Code". This agreement will facilitate the acquisition of resources for the County of San Luis Obispo. In addition the state standard operating procedures for California Highway Patrol, Caltrans and CA State Parks are reviewed on an annual basis by San Luis Obispo County to ensure consistency between agencies. Federal (such as NRC) agreements are with the State of California. Federal and state resources necessary to implement concepts of operations contained in the Plan are addressed in approved state and federal general and radiological emergency response plans. (See State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan. July 2008) . 9 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SECTION 2 - HAZARD ASSESSMENT 1. SITUATION The Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP), operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), is located on the coast approximately 12 miles southwest of the city of San Luis Obispo (see Figure 2.1, REGIONAL LOCATION MAP). The plant contains two power generating units, both of which are operational. Each unit is a pressurized water reactor having an electric power generating capacity in excess of 1,000 megawatts. The plant is designed to use slightly enriched uranium dioxide (UO2) as a fuel. This fuel poses no major concern in its un-irradiated state as it has very low radioactivity. However, after being in the core during operation of the reactor, the fuel becomes extremely radioactive from fission by-products. These highly radioactive by-products are the main hazard in a nuclear power plant accident. When any nuclear power plant is operated, a nuclear accident is possible. The principal deterrent to an accident is prevention through correct design, construction and operation which assures the integrity of the reactor system is maintained. Protective systems are installed and are automatically activated to counteract the resulting effects when any part of the reactor system fails. These protective systems cannot provide absolute certainty that a failure will not occur; nor if it does occur, that it will be effectively counteracted. The probability, however, of a radiological emergency at a power plant is extremely low. 2. RADIATION AND HAZARDS Radioactivity is the natural process of unstable atoms releasing their excess energy. This emission - giving up of energy – is called radiation. Radiation is divided into two types: non-ionizing and ionizing. Ionizing radiation is associated with nuclear power generation, as well as other commonly known sources such as medical and dental x-rays. The extent and severity of the radiation effect upon body cells depends upon the amount of radioactive materials, the type of radiation, the exposure rate and time, and how close it is to the body. In general, the closer the source of radiation is to the cells, the greater the possibility of injury. There are two types of ionizing radiation that must be considered in nuclear power plant emergency response planning - beta particles and gamma rays. Fission by-products of nuclear power production generally emit both beta particles and gamma rays. Other types of radiation are not discussed in this section because they are not expected to 10 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 contribute significantly to the total radioactive contamination following an accidental release from a nuclear power plant. As used in this document, beta particle refers to a small, negatively-charged mass that is ejected from an atom as a result of nuclear rearrangement. Due to their limited penetrating ability, beta particles become a significant health hazard only when the radioactive materials emitting them are present on the surface of the skin or when they have been ingested or inhaled. Body surface contamination from beta particle emitters will lead to irradiation of only the superficial body tissue. Ingestion or inhalation of beta particles is much more serious. Frequently the beta-emitting nuclides are isotopes of elements that can be incorporated into body constituents. They may result in long term exposure of the cells, extensive irradiation, and subsequent destruction of cells. Gamma rays are a type of electromagnetic radiation also released from the nucleus of an atom. Because they have no mass, they can penetrate matter more readily than beta particles. They are capable of traveling significant distances in air and penetrating through the protective skin layer to the soft tissue below. This means the entire body can be irradiated from a gamma source outside the body. Similarly, when ingested or inhaled, gamma emitters can produce whole body irradiation, regardless of the location in the body where the radioisotope may be ultimately absorbed. Determining the health effects of overexposure to radiation is complicated by the fact that there is a large range of variation in individual response. Some people may be very sensitive and others somewhat resistant to radiation. Determination of the dose/health effects relationship is further complicated by the fact that the effects of whole body irradiation differ from the effects of partial body exposure; a lethal dose in the first case might be readily tolerated in the second. The effects also depend on the timing of exposure, such as short term exposure (acute) vs. repeated (chronic) exposures spread out over days or weeks. Repeated exposures spread out over time permit a significant degree of recovery and therefore require a larger total dose to show the same effects as for an acute exposure. Radiation is measured in three basic units: ■ Roentgen (R) The Roentgen is the unit of exposure ■ Radiation Absorbed Dose (RAD) The RAD is the unit of absorbed dose ■ Roentgen Equivalent Man (REM) The REM is the unit of dose equivalent For the purpose of the Plan a Roentgen is equal to a RAD is equal to a REM (1R = 1RAD = 1 REM). 11 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Table 2.1, RELATIONSHIP OF WHOLE BODY DOSE TO HEALTH EFFECTS presents representative dose/health effect relationships in man for whole body irradiation. The health effects extend from barely detectable chromosomal changes at 5 REM to a median lethal dose for short-term exposure of 300 REM, assuming no follow-up medical treatment. (A median lethal dose means that death will occur for 50 percent of the population receiving the whole body dose.) A more complete discussion of the health effects of exposure can be found in "Emergency Planning Zones for Serious Nuclear Power Plant Accidents," State of California Office of Emergency Services, November, 1980. 3. EXPOSURE CRITERIA Exposure to large quantities of nuclear radiation over a relatively short period of time can cause disabling sickness and death. Exposure to lesser quantities, either externally or through inhalation and ingestion, may result in chronic impairment to health. Radiation exposure may also damage the genetic material in the body of individuals, resulting in health impairment in future generations. Therefore, stringent guides have been established as follows: (Refer to Table 2.2, RADIATION EXPOSURE CRITERIA.) The unit most commonly used to measure human exposure to radiation is the REM. Most normal exposures involve only a fraction of a REM. The most commonly used unit is the milliREM (mRem), one thousandth of a REM. 3.1 General Population 3.1.1 Whole Body Exposure The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends taking protective actions to protect the general population from exposure to airborne radioactive materials when the projected Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) is 1.0 REM. Lower values may be used if there are no major local constraints in providing protection at that level. Local constraints, such as very dense fog, may make lower values impractical to use, but in no case should the 1.0 REM be exceeded for the general population in determining the need for protective action. Therefore, the San Luis Obispo County Plan will adopt a guideline of 1.0 REM, in accordance with the State Plan. It should be noted, that consistent with the generally accepted principle of maintaining radiation exposures "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA), the County may initiate protective actions at lower projected levels, if the risk of eliminating the exposure is determined to be less than the risk of exposure. 3.1.2 Thyroid Dose 12 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Radioactive iodine concentration in the thyroid of persons exposed to radioactive iodine could result in serious damage to that organ. These isotopes could enter the body either by inhalation or ingestion. It is estimated that approximately 20 percent of that which is inhaled would enter the blood stream and selectively locate in the thyroid. The EPA guides for projected thyroid dose to the general population are 5.0 REM (thyroid Committed Dose Equivalent (CDE)) and are to be used in California, according to the State Plan. 3.2 Emergency Workers Any person engaged in operations to mitigate the effects of an accident is an emergency worker. This includes public employees (and others registered with a disaster council), who are classified as disaster service workers in Section 3211.9 of the California Labor Code and Part 1, Section 4 of this Plan. Emergency workers will have their exposures monitored during the emergency on a 24 hour basis, through the exposure control procedures contained within the Plan (see Part Three, Standard Operating Procedures). EMERGENCY WORKER EXPOSURE GUIDELINES NOTE: DO NOT EXCEED EXPOSURE or DOSE LIMITS LISTED BELOW WITHOUT COUNTY HEALTH OFFICER (CHO) AUTHORIZATION. Category PED Dose Limit Comments 1. EMERGENCY EXPOSURE GUIDELINES Administrative Exposure ( DDE dose) Limit 1,000 mrem (1.00 rem) DDE dose Administrative Exposure limit for emergency workers is set at 1,000 mrem DDE dose. Unless authorized to continue work, return to your EWEC Command Center, or other location as directed, immediately. Emergency Activities Up to 5,000 mrem (5 rem) TEDE dose The CHO must authorize exposure in excess of 1,000 mrem DDE dose. If authorized, you may receive up to 5,000 mrem TEDE dose for emergency activities. Activities to protect valuable property where lower dose is not practical. Up to 10,000 mrem (10 rem) TEDE dose With CHO authorization, up to 10,000 mrem TEDE dose may be authorized for protection of valuable property where a lower dose is not practical. Volunteers Only. Safety Briefing. Life-saving activities or protection of large populations where lower dose is not practical. Up to 25,000 mrem (25 rem) TEDE dose. With CHO authorization, volunteers may be authorized up to 25,000 mrem (25 rem) TEDE dose for the purpose of life saving actions or the protection of large populations where a lower dose is not practical. Volunteers Only. Safety Briefing 13 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Extraordinary 25,000-75,0000 mrem With CHO authorization, volunteers may be Life-saving (25-75 rem) TEDE authorized up to 75,000 mrem (75 rem) TEDE activities or dose. dose for the purpose of extraordinary life- protection of saving activities or protection of large large populations populations where lower dose is not practical where lower and ONLY if they have been made fully aware dose is not of the risks. Volunteers Only. Safety Briefing practical 3.2.1 Emergency Operations Administrative Exposure Limit • Up to 1,000 mrem (1.00 rem) DDE as read on the PED (without CHO authorization) Note: The PED reads and is calibrated to measure the DDE dose in units of mrem. Exposure is in units of R. In this instance exposure and dose are approximately equal. The DDE dose approximates exposure. However it does not measure a TEDE dose. The TEDE dose is calculated based upon a dose correction factor which is based on the isotopic mix of the release. The DDE 1000 mrem (1000 mR equivalent) administrative exposure limit is established at this level to ensure the Federal Dose limit of 5 rem TEDE is not exceeded, which is calculated by multiplying the DDE dose or exposure by the dose correction factor based upon the isotopic mix. If due to the application of a dose correction factor, an emergency worker exceeds the 1000 mrem DDE prior to receiving authorization, notify the CHO. Emergency workers working under the guidance of this procedure are authorized to receive up to 1,000 mrem DDE as read on the PED or 1000 mR exposure (1.00 rem) without CHO authorization. The EWEC Group will inform the CHO when emergency worker exposures approach the Administrative Exposure Limit of 1,000 mrem (1.00) DDE as read on their PEDs. The CHO will evaluate current emergency conditions and authorize DDE exposures in excess of 1,000 mrem (1.00 rem) as read on the PED or (1000 mR on any exposure reading instrumentation), if undertaking activities appropriate to the dose limits listed below. If possible, a dose correction factor should be identified and applied before allowing workers to exceed 1000 mrem as read on their PED to ensure they remain under the TEDE dose limits. Emergency workers may receive up to 5,000 mrem (5.0 rem) TEDE for emergency activities. This will be based upon the calculated TEDE dose using a dose correction factor. This dose may be authorized to allow for emergency activities. 14 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Dose Limit for Emergency Activities • 5,000 mrem (5.0 rem) TEDE TEDE dose above 5,000 mrem (5.0 rem) requires further CHO authorization. The CHO will ensure emergency workers are only authorized to receive additional exposure if they are undertaking activities in accordance with Federal Dose Limits as listed below 3.2.2 Dose Limit for Protection of Valuable Property where a lower dose is not practical. • Up to 10,000 mrem (10.00 rem) TEDE Following authorization from CHO, emergency workers may subsequently receive up to 10,000 mrem (10.0 rem) TEDE. This will be based upon the calculated TEDE dose using a dose correction factor. This dose may be authorized to allow for the protection of valuable property where a lower dose is not practical. Emergency Workers authorized to receive up to 10,000 mrem (10.0 rem) will undertake operations on a volunteer basis only and receive a safety briefing. TEDE dose above 10,000 mrem (10.0 rem) requires further CHO authorization. 3.2.3 Dose Limit for Life Saving Activities or Protection of Large Populations where a lower dose is not practical. • Up to 25,000 mrem (25.0 rem) TEDE Following authorization from CHO, emergency workers may subsequently receive up to 25,000 mrem (25.0 rem) TEDE. This will be based upon the calculated TEDE dose using a dose correction factor. This dose may be authorized for life saving activities or protection of large populations where a lower dose is not practical. Emergency workers authorized to receive up to 25,000 mrem (25.0 rem) will undertake operations on a volunteer basis only. Each emergency worker shall receive a safety briefing. TEDE dose above 25,000 mrem (25.0 rem) requires further CHO authorization. 15 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 3.2.4 Dose Limit for Extraordinary Life Saving Activities or Protection of Large Populations Where a Lower Dose is Not Practical. • >25,000 mrem (>25 rem) TEDE. Up to 75,000 mrem (75.rem) Following authorization from CHO and a safety briefing informing them of their risks, emergency workers may subsequently receive greater than 25,000 mrem (25.0 rem) TEDE, up to 75,000 mrem (75 rem). This will be based upon the calculated TEDE dose using a dose correction factor. The emergency workers must be made fully aware of the risks and be provided a safety briefing. Emergency Workers authorized to receive greater than 25,000 mrem or (25.0 rem) TEDE will undertake operations on a volunteer basis only. Authorization will only be given for operations necessary for extraordinary lifesaving activities and protection of large populations. 3.2.5 Volunteer Criteria When emergency actions require an emergency worker to enter an area where exposures could exceed 5,000 mrem (5.0 rem), the following guidelines will be used: 3.2.5.1 Emergency personnel shall be volunteers and professional rescue personnel, if possible. 3.2.5.2 Volunteers shall be broadly familiar will the consequences of expected exposure, and shall be informed prior to the time of potential exposure. 3.2.5.3 Volunteers above the age of 45 are preferred and will not include women capable of reproduction. 3.2.5.4 Internal exposure shall be minimized, when appropriate, by the use of best available respiratory protection and thyroid blocking. Skin contamination shall be controlled by the use of available protective clothing. 3.2.5.5 Exposure under these conditions shall be limited to once in a lifetime. 16 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SECTION 3 - PLANNING BASIS This plan is based on guidance from the federal planning document titled NUREG-0654/FEMA- REP-1, Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants. NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1 was developed jointly by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) after the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. The document incorporates the lessons learned from inquiries into the response actions taken during the accident. Other FEMA and state agencies’ guidance and direction are also utilized. 1. EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONES Technical experts and government agencies have worked to develop nuclear power plant emergency response plans for all of the nuclear power plants in the United States. As part of this planning, the areas around the plants are divided into planning zones. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency have determined that a federally defined Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) for the plume exposure pathway should be an area that is roughly a 10 mile circle around the nuclear power plant and an approximate 50 mile radius limit for the Ingestion Pathway Zone (IPZ). The (FEMA) has oversight responsibilities for San Luis Obispo County’s emergency plans within this approximate 10 mile area. FEMA also has oversight responsibilities for the California Department of Public Health emergency plans within the 50 mile IPZ radius. The State of California adopted San Luis Obispo County’s recommendations to expand the Diablo Canyon Emergency Planning Zone so that it is much larger than the 10 mile radius EPZ defined by the federal government. The State of California’s Emergency Management Agency has oversight responsibilities for the expanded EPZ beyond the 10 mile area. 1.1 Federal Emergency Planning Zones NRC/FEMA have established a 10 mile radius limit for the plume exposure pathway emergency planning zone and an approximate 50 mile radius limit for the ingestion pathway emergency planning zone (IPZ). Figure 3.1.1 illustrates the NRC/FEMA 10 mile EPZ boundary and Figure 3.1.2 illustrates the NRC defined 50 mile IPZ boundary in 22.5 –degree sectors. 1.2 State Emergency Planning Zones Based upon an extensive study2, the state designated two zones associated with the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) and the Public Education Zone (PEZ). Both are illustrated in Figure 3-2. The Public 2 A Study of Postulated Accidents of California Nuclear Power Plants, Prepared for the State of California, Office of Emergency Services by Science Applications, Inc., July, 1980 17 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Education Zone continues across the county boundary to include an area of northern Santa Barbara County. As described earlier, Figure 3.1.2 illustrates the 50 mile radius IPZ, which includes four total counties (San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Monterey and Kern Counties). A summary description of the state study and process of selection of emergency planning zones is given in "Emergency Planning Zones for Serious Nuclear Power Plant Accidents," State of California Office of Emergency Services (now Cal OES), November, 1980. 1.3 County Planning As noted above, the state planning zones form a basis for county planning. The expanded Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) defined by the state is divided into 12 Protective Action Zones. PAZs 1 – 5 correspond to the approximate ten mile Federal emergency planning area. PAZs 6 – 12 are outside the ten mile area. Having 12 PAZs improve the managing of detailed planning and implementing the protective measures in areas smaller than the entire emergency planning zone. Surrounding the 12 PAZs are three zones known as Public Education Zones (PEZs). • Residents in these areas (zones 13 – 15) are outside but immediately adjacent to the Emergency Planning Zone. The PEZ was established to ensure general information about Diablo Canyon is provided to residents and businesses surrounding the PAZs. PAZs and PEZs are described in Table 3.1 (sheet 1 and 2), and shown in Figure 3.2. The Protective Action Zones may be arranged into four groups of generally increasing distance from the plant. ● PAZ 1 2-mile radius ● PAZ 2 6-mile radius ● PAZs 3-5 Approximate 9- to 10-mile radius - Primary federal oversight areas of PAZs 1-5 ● PAZs 6-12 Balance of State Emergency Planning Zones - State primary oversight ● PEZs 13-15 Public Education Zone - Area where public education materials are provided. Any emergency protective actions would be on an ad hoc basis. 18 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 In addition to the Federal, State, and County Emergency Planning Zones the County has pre-identified Agricultural Sectors for purposes of Ingestion Pathway Planning. (See Figure 3.3, Ingestion Pathway Zone Map.) 2. METEOROLOGY Figure 3.4 indicates annual average wind direction and speed conditions both in graphic and tabular form.3 (The wind rose represents the percentage distribution of wind direction on an annual timeframe.) Extensive meteorological and dispersion data may be found in "Volume II, Site Characteristics, Final Safety Analysis Report, Diablo Canyon Power Plant." In addition, discussion of certain "worst-case" meteorological conditions is included in the Cal OES planning guidance document.4 3. PROTECTIVE ACTIONS A variety of countermeasures (Protective Actions) are available that can be used to reduce or eliminate the effects of radiation and contamination on the public that may result from a nuclear power plant accident. Countermeasures that could be used are described below. For the general public, the two basic protective actions which may be taken immediately to prevent or reduce exposure to a gaseous plume are evacuation and shelter in place. The actual radiation release or projected arrival of the radioactive plume will be key in the selection of the most effective protective response. In the event that this lead time is relatively short and the release is not of long duration, the most effective protection may be afforded by shelter in place with doors and windows tightly closed. Under such circumstances evacuation may not be effectively completed prior to the passage of the radioactive plume, resulting in less protection than that afforded by sheltering. Table 3.4 is a simplified example of how a decision whether to shelter or evacuate might be made. It should be noted that this table is predicated on an accident projection and meteorological conditions so severe that dose projections indicate a need to take protective actions. It should be noted that Table 3.4 does not reflect all of the criteria involved in making a protective action decision. Actual decision-making is based upon detailed calculations and consideration of other variables, including the predicted magnitude and composition of a potential release, meteorology and other offsite conditions. 3 060104/DCPP wind rose map (PG&E) 4 See “Emergency Planning Zone for Serious Nuclear Power Plant Accidents,” State of California Office of Emergency Services. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 19 The protective actions to mitigate the potential offsite consequences should be selected on the basis of the following key factors: ● The accident sequence at the plant ● The projected or actual release, both in terms of content and magnitude ● The projected or actual time of a release ● The projected travel paths of the plume ● The time of day of the accident ● The weather and other conditions that exist at the time of the accident The types of protective actions to be considered for implementation include: 3.1 Evacuation Evacuation is a major countermeasure to prevent or reduce exposure and contamination of the general public. It is a complex operation involving several governmental jurisdictions. The effectiveness of an evacuation is considerably enhanced by detailed planning. Emergency workers should be evacuated when the general public is cleared from the area. 3.2 Sheltering from Radiation Sheltering means staying inside with all doors and windows closed, and ventilation systems turned off. Sheltering reduces exposure to radiation. It reduces the chances of inhaling or receiving body surface contamination from radioactive materials. 3.3 Administration of Iodine Blocking Pills The thyroid gland collects and concentrates iodine. Since large amounts of radioactive iodine are part of the inventory of radionuclides present in the nuclear reactor core, radioactive iodine could be released during a nuclear power plant accident. Iodine blocking liquid or pills are made of potassium iodide (KI). Taken prior to inhalation or ingestion of radioactive iodine, KI will saturate the thyroid gland with non-radioactive iodine, thus reducing the body's assimilation of the radioactive isotope. 5 This can greatly reduce the internal radiation dose to the thyroid. It will not protect against other radioisotope contamination or other organs or external radiation exposure. Iodine blocking pills or liquid may be used for the thyroid protection of emergency workers, general public and may also be recommended for institutionalized populations that cannot evacuate. The ingesting of potassium iodide will be authorized and recommended appropriately by the County Health Officer or a State Health Official after the evaluation of pertinent data. 5 NRC: SECY-98-264 - Proposed Amendments to 10 CFR 50.47; Granting of Petitions for Rulemaking (PRM 50-63 and 50-63a) Relating to a Reevaluation of Policy on the Use of Potassium Iodide (KI) after a Severe Accident at a Nuclear Power Plant.1998. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 20 4. PROTECTIVE ACTIONS FOR EMERGENCY WORKERS An Emergency Worker is any person engaged in operations required to mitigate the effects of an accident. For information about emergency worker operations and exposure limits see Section 2, 3.2. Each county agency or other organizations involved in field emergency response in the affected area will have the means to monitor and minimize radiation exposure to its personnel. Equipment such as dosimeters will be provided to applicable emergency workers at their respective dispatch or work locations. In some circumstances or functions, area monitoring, rather than individual dosimetry, will be permitted for emergency workers. To limit the exposure to emergency workers, every effort will be made to coordinate activities in the affected areas so that unnecessary exposure is limited. The County Health Officer will be assisted by the Emergency Worker Exposure Control Group personnel in tracking exposure of emergency workers. The County Health Officer will be responsible for monitoring and controlling exposures. The County Health Officer will recommend actions to protect county emergency workers including, but not limited to, ingesting potassium iodide (KI), relocating, using protective clothing and respirators. Joint Field Monitoring Teams may wear special respirators in contaminated areas to prevent inhalation of airborne radioactive materials, and protective clothing to prevent contamination of the skin. 4.1 Respirators (For Emergency Workers) Respirators prevent the inhalation of airborne radioactive materials. Respirators may be most applicable to emergency workers conducting field monitoring operations in the contaminated area and will be addressed in their Standard Operating Procedures. Respirators offer no protection from external exposure to gamma radiation. Respirators will only be recommended for those trained and fitted in their use. Protective clothing and respirators should be used in areas of high contamination or airborne activity, providing TEDE is maintained by ALARA. Respirators will only be directed for those trained and fitted in their use. 4.2 Protective Clothing (For Emergency Workers) Protective clothing is worn to prevent contamination of the skin. Its principal value is to reduce or eliminate the need for skin decontaminations, but it offers no protection from gamma radiation exposure. Emergency Workers have Standard Operating Procedures and guidelines to follow in addressing the prevention of contamination. Most emergency workers will not be need to use nor be required to wear protective clothing. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 21 5. AGRICULTURAL PREVENTATIVE AND HOLD ORDERS FOR FOOD COMMODITIES, LIVESTOCK, ETC. 5.1 AGRICULTURAL PREVENTATIVE MEASURES MAY INCLUDE: 5.1.1 Shelter all livestock (including dairy animals, cows, horses, goats, sheep and pigs) and place on stored feed and water. 5.1.2 Shelter all poultry and place on stored feed and water. 5.1.3 Stop pumping from outdoor/ uncovered surface water sources 5.1.4 Stop all harvest activities including apiaries and backyard gardens 5.1.5 Stop field preparations and tillage 5.2 AGRICULTURAL HOLD ORDERS MAY INCLUDE: This is the process of placing a commodity on hold. Agricultural Sectors consist of pre-identified geographic areas where radiological contamination could occur and include buffer areas (See Figure 3.3). 5.2.1 Agricultural Hold Measures: • Hold dairy products • Hold harvested crops • Hold livestock and poultry • Hold other consumables • Cease movement of food within an area 5.3 Support Actions May Include: 5.3.1 Importation of Clean Food and Water Radiation and contamination levels may be low enough to meet occupancy standards but not low enough for contaminated food and water in the area to meet ingestion standards. Such food and water San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 22 will be tested in a laboratory to determine if it meets ingestion standards. Food and water will be imported until local supplies are determined to be free from contamination. 5.3.2 Decontamination Decontamination is the reduction or removal of radioactive material from a structure, area, vehicle, food item, object, or person. Decontamination may be accomplished by treating the surface to remove or decrease the contamination. 5.3.3 Allowing for Radioactive Decay An effective countermeasure for some types of radiation is obtained by allowing the time needed for radioactive particles to decay and by keeping the general population from radioactive items, areas, food and water. The normal use of items and areas can be resumed when radiation and/or contamination levels meet acceptable standards. 6. EVACUATION ROUTES, CONCEPTS, AND ASSUMPTIONS 6.1 Routes Local evacuation routes through individual communities and major recreation centers are shown in the November 2012 Diablo Canyon Power Plant Development of Evacuation Times Estimates, KLD Engineering, P.C., Figure 3.5 and Figures 3.6.1-13 show those evacuation routes. Essentially all state highways and U.S. 101 serve as major evacuation routes. Key local evacuation routes connect to the through routes. Figures 3.6.8-12 show local evacuation routes for state and local parks. The California Highway Patrol (CHP) will coordinate control of evacuation traffic throughout the EPZ to provide optimum usage of available capacity. The CHP has developed an extensive Evacuation Traffic Management Plan. Figure 3.7 shows locations established to receive evacuees toward the south, a Reception Center at the Santa Maria Fairpark, and toward the north a Reception and Congregate Care center at Camp Roberts. These centers are accessible from the evacuation routes and are more than five miles outside the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). Figure 3.8 shows locations established as public school relocation centers. These facilities are accessible from the evacuation routes and are located outside the EPZ. School children are relocated early in the emergency, allowing parents and children to be reunited prior to going to one of the Evacuee Monitoring, Decontamination, Reception and Congregate Care Centers. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 23 6.2 Evacuation Concepts and Assumptions Certain assumptions and operational concepts surround traffic management during any evacuation connected with the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. The following is a discussion of these ideas. Wind Direction: Current and predicted wind conditions are factors involved in the evacuation of specific Protective Action Zones (PAZs). Since more than one PAZ may be affected, the CHP has the zones grouped into three basic sectors; North, San Luis Obispo and South sectors. Wind velocity, specifically the time necessary for a release plume to travel through or over a PAZ, will also have a critical bearing upon the decision to evacuate. It will determine the lead time required to obtain and place a sufficient number of officers in the field to assist with traffic control during the evacuation. CHP Staffing Requirements: Officers will be assembled and dispatched according to Standard Operating Procedures. The number of officers estimated to staff each PAZ during an evacuation has been determined. During an emergency, when it becomes apparent that an evacuation may be necessary, CHP officers will be assembled and briefed at safe locations which lends to expeditious deployment. They will be issued emergency worker exposure control equipment and procedures, and briefed on their use. If an evacuation becomes imminent, CHP officers will be dispatched to direct traffic at their assigned posts. Due to the numbers of officers needed to manage the evacuation traffic, CHP personnel from outside San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Monterey Counties will be required. Traffic Restrictions - U.S. 101: Through traffic on U.S. 101 can be diverted at several points north and south of San Luis Obispo County in anticipation of an evacuation. When the County Command Group determines the evacuation is necessary, traffic can be diverted as follows: ● South of San Luis Obispo: Northbound traffic can be diverted at State Hwy. 126 in Ventura County; Hwy. 246 and Hwy. 154 in Santa Barbara County; and at Hwy. 166 in San Luis Obispo County eastbound and diverted to the Interstate 5 freeway. ● Likewise, traffic westbound on Hwy. 246 and Hwy. 154 can be restricted to residents of northern Santa Barbara and southern San Luis Obispo Counties. ● North of San Luis Obispo: Southbound traffic can be diverted at Hwy. 152 in Santa Clara County, Hwy. 198 in Monterey County and Hwy. 46 in San Luis Obispo County eastbound to the Interstate 5 freeway. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 24 ● Likewise, traffic westbound on Hwy. 46, Hwy. 41 and Hwy. 58 can be restricted to residents of San Luis Obispo County. ● Traffic southbound on Hwy. 1 can be diverted at Carmel Valley Road in Monterey County. Media Coordination: CHP offices in the counties to the north and south of San Luis Obispo County will coordinate and implement the traffic diversion methods. CHP Offices in the Los Angeles and San Francisco metropolitan areas may also be involved. Evacuation Traffic Management: Once an evacuation order is given, two way traffic flow may be able to continue. Emergency vehicles and returning buses used in transporting evacuees must have ingress to the area. People may be allowed to return home to retrieve family members, personal property, pets and medications. For this reason, heavy traffic is expected in and out of the PAZs designated for evacuation. This movement will likely occur during the first one to three hours of the evacuation. Outbound traffic flows should become heaviest as additional PAZs evacuate. Traffic control points will be managed with these anticipated traffic flows in mind. 7. EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATES The estimated evacuation time for a PAZ is used to determine, under a specific projected accident condition, whether evacuation or sheltering provides the best protective action to take. A detailed analysis of evacuation has been conducted and is described in November 2012 Diablo Canyon Power Plant Development of Evacuation Time Estimates.6 Based on these studies, evacuation time estimates for various combinations of protective action zones have been developed. The evacuation time for institutions is a function of the particular institution’s population and the availability of local and outside vehicles suitable for evacuation. The Evacuation Time Estimates is fully incorporated in this plan by reference for brevity purposes and to avoid duplication. The ETE may also be modified or revised in different time periods from this plan. See the distribution page at the beginning of this plan for locations of the full Evacuation Time Estimates. 8. EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVEL (ECL) 6 Diablo Canyon Power Plant Development of Evacuation Time Estimates, KLD Engineering, P.C. November 2012. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 25 Federal regulations and regulatory guidelines7 (NRC/FEMA) classify radiological emergency conditions into four categories. These four categories which cover the entire spectrum of postulated accidents are: ● UNUSUAL EVENT ● ALERT ● SITE AREA EMERGENCY ● GENERAL EMERGENCY Certain planned actions will be taken by the utility and/or offsite authorities in response to each of the four indicated emergency classification levels. DCPP/PG&E and the County of San Luis Obispo have agreed to take actions at each defined emergency level that equal or exceed the minimum response designated in federal guidance. These response actions, by the county and DCPP/PG&E, are described in this section and shown in Table 3.7. However, the Command Group’s Protection Action Decisions are not limited to the response actions in Table 3.7. Actual decision-making is based upon detailed calculations, deliberations and consideration of other variables, including the predicted magnitude and composition of a potential release, meteorology and other offsite conditions. An event need not begin at an Unusual Event classification and progress through higher ECLs. An event may begin and end without escalating to a higher ECL. 8.1 UNUSUAL EVENT UNUSUAL EVENTS are events that are in process or have occurred which indicate a potential degradation of the level of safety of the plant or indicate a security threat to facility protection has been initiated. No releases of radioactive material requiring offsite response or monitoring are expected unless further degradation of safety systems occurs. These events do not constitute emergency conditions in themselves, but could escalate to more severe conditions if appropriate action is not taken. Upon notification of an UNUSUAL EVENT at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, required actions will include notification of the County of San Luis Obispo, Cal OES and dissemination of information to designated elected officials and county governmental agencies. The primary purpose of offsite notification at an UNUSUAL EVENT is to apprise county officials of abnormal conditions at the facility which may create significant public interest. The frequency of UNUSUAL EVENTS may be several times a year or more. Offsite notification also ensures unscheduled testing of the offsite communication links. See Table 3.7 sheet 1. 7 Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Federal Emergency Management Agency, NUREG 0654/FEMA-REP-1, Revisio n 1, October 2011. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 26 8.2 ALERT The ALERT classification is characterized by events that are in process or have occurred that involve actual or potential substantial degradation of the level of safety of the plant or a security event that involves probable life threatening risk to site personnel or damage to site equipment because of hostile action. Any releases are expected to be limited to small fractions of the U. S. EPA Protective Action Guideline exposure levels.11 The ALERT classification constitutes the lowest level where emergency response assistance to the plant site (such as medical, fire, or law enforcement) may be anticipated.8 Limited releases or radioactive material to the environment may occur, possibly resulting in a dose of ≤1 mREM to the whole body at the site boundary (approximately 0.5 mile from the plant) under average meteorological conditions. Upon notification of an ALERT at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, required actions will include: activation of the San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operations Center (EOC), placing key emergency response resources and personnel on standby, provision of confirmatory monitoring, notification of all involved governmental officials designated in this Plan, and dissemination of information to the public. County and State Parks may be closed at the ALERT classification according to the responsible jurisdiction’s Standard Operating Procedures (SOP). The Command Group may also take additional actions. The County Office of Education may confirm the dispatching of buses by San Luis Coastal Unified School District to Bellevue-Santa Fe Charter School. San Luis Coastal School District may dispatch buses to standby at appropriate schools to facilitate possible relocation. Precautionary relocation of some schools may occur at this stage following consultation by the District Superintendent of Schools with the County Superintendent of Schools or designee located at the EOC. The County Superintendent of Schools will maintain communication with each school district’s superintendent and provide briefings to the Command Group regarding each school district’s actions. The purpose of the ALERT classification is to ensure that plant and offsite emergency personnel are readily available to respond if the situation becomes more serious. Secondary purposes are to provide offsite authorities with current status information. See Table 3.7 sheet 2. 11 U. S. EPA 400-R-92-001 (May 92) Manual of Protective Action Guides and Protective Action s for Nuclear Inc idents 8 Diablo Canyon Power Plant Emergency Plan. September, 2001 Revision 4 Change 5 Section 4, 4.1.2. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 27 8.3 SITE AREA EMERGENCY A SITE AREA EMERGENCY is characterized by events in process or that have occurred that involve actual or potential substantial degradation of the level of safety of the plant or a security event that involves probable life threatening risk to site personnel or damage to site equipment because of hostile action. Any releases expected to be limited to small fractions of the U.S. EPA Protective Action Guideline exposure levels. Although emergency actions for public protection may not be necessary, offsite emergency response organizations should be mobilized and ready to implement protective measures. Most events within the SITE AREA EMERGENCY classification constitute actual or probable releases of radioactive material to the environment. This includes any releases not expected to exceed U.S. EPA Protective Action Guides except near the site boundary. In general, offsite doses (should they occur) would be less than 1 REM whole body at the site area boundary (approximately 0.5 mile radius). Protective actions may be advised at the SITE AREA EMERGENCY classification. Closure of parks and beaches may also be advised. Upon notification of a SITE AREA EMERGENCY at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, the San Luis Obispo County EOC will be activated. Other actions may include mobilization of emergency response personnel, public warning, assessment and/or implementation of precautionary actions, monitoring, and continued assessment. The purpose of SITE AREA EMERGENCY notification is to assure that response centers are activated and staffed; to assure that monitoring teams are dispatched; to assure availability of personnel to support protective measures should they become necessary; and to disseminate information. See Table 3.7 sheet 3. 8.4 GENERAL EMERGENCY A GENERAL EMERGENCY classification is characterized by events that are in process or have occurred which involve actual or imminent substantial core degradation or melting with potential for loss of containment integrity or hostile action that results in an actual loss of physical control of the facility. Releases can be reasonably expected to exceed EPA Protective Action Guidelines exposure levels offsite for more than the immediate site area. Most all events within this classification constitute actual or imminent releases of radioactive materials to the environment, one notable exception is an ECL for security issues. Projected offsite doses could be 1.0 REM or greater to the whole body and 5.0 REM or greater to the thyroid. Protective actions, possibly evacuation, will likely be necessary. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 28 Upon notification of a GENERAL EMERGENCY at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, actions will include activation of the San Luis Obispo County EOC; mobilization of emergency response personnel; public notification, information, and instructions; implementation of protective actions as appropriate; continued monitoring, and continued assessment. Depending on the situation, the most likely protective action to be taken would be an evacuation of PAZs 1 and 2 (six miles around plant) surrounding the plant and consideration of evacuation and/or sheltering in areas further downwind. During a Security Event, any protective actions decisions made by the County Command Group will be carefully considered and coordinated with the event. The purpose of the GENERAL EMERGENCY notification is to initiate predetermined protective actions for the public, to provide for continuous assessment of data supplied by DCPP, to initiate any additional measures, and to disseminate information to the public. See Table 3.7 sheet 4. Examples of nuclear power plant emergency initiating conditions which will result in the declaration of an emergency classification can be found in NUREG 0654/FEMA-REP-1, Appendix 1. 9. TIME FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH RELEASE The range of predicted times between the onset of accident conditions and the start of a major release is on the order of one-half to several hours. The subsequent time period over which radioactive material may be expected to be released is on the order of one- half hour (short-term release) to a few days (continuous release). Table 3.7 summarizes the guidance on time of the release. 10. EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE This section addresses emergency response activities necessary to concurrently implement the San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan and the San Luis Obispo County Earthquake Emergency Response Plan (Earthquake Plan). 10.1 Activation of Plans The occurrence of a major earthquake will require the implementation of local and state earthquake emergency response plans if significant damage has occurred. In addition, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has mandated through regulatory guidelines9 the automatic activation of radiologic emergency 9 NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Revision 1, Appendix 1 – Emergency Action Level Guides for Nuclear Power Plants, 1980, as modified by Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Power Reactors, NRC Regulatory Guide 1.101, Revision 3, August 1992. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 29 plans for seismic shock exceeding specified levels as registered at the site of a nuclear power plant. The Emergency Classification Level (ECL) system includes the declaration of an emergency based on any earthquake felt in-plant or detected by the Plant's Seismic Monitoring System. Following the ECL descriptions in Section 3.6 above, an earthquake monitored at the Plant would be classified based on gravitational (g) acceleration: < 0.01 g (or felt within protected area) UNUSUAL EVENT 0.01< to < 0.20 g ALERT 0.20< to < 0.40 g SITE AREA EMERGENCY Plant equipment damaged with GENERAL EMERGENCY potential to cause a significant release * (NOTE: The Diablo Canyon Power Plant is manually tripped at 0.40 g if it hasn't been automatically tripped by instrumentation at 0.35 g.) 10.2 Scope of Earthquake Plans The San Luis Obispo County Earthquake Emergency Response Plan provides guidance for coordinating efforts throughout the county as a result of damaging earthquake. Part of the effort includes guidelines to check on damages throughout the area, including damage at Diablo Canyon. As with other emergency management efforts, response priorities after an earthquake are determined based on what areas need immediate assistance the most, or which situation requires immediate attention. As such, should an earthquake cause damages to Diablo Canyon which require an immediate response, emergency resources can be used to concentrate on needed response efforts as outlined in both this plan and the earthquake plan. The County's Earthquake Plan provides an overview of the range of potential damage caused by earthquake and it provides for immediate response to a major damaging earthquake by local county and city agencies Activation of the earthquake plan provides for immediate implementation of situation reporting and damage assessment efforts by local, state, volunteer and private organizations throughout the county. A more detailed explanation of the organizational structure, command authority, responsibilities, functions and San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 30 interactions required to mitigate the effects of an earthquake-caused emergency is located in the County Earthquake Emergency Response Plan. 11. TSUNAMI RESPONSE This section addresses emergency response activities necessary to concurrently implement the San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan and the San Luis Obispo County Tsunami Emergency Response Plan. The ECL system includes the declaration of an emergency based on emergency response and coordination related to receipt of a tsunami watch, advisory, or warning or the occurrence of an actual tsunami along the San Luis Obispo County coastline. Tsunamis are a series of ocean waves generated by vertical movement of the sea floor. The movement is typically caused by earthquake related faulting, but can also result from submarine landslides or volcanic eruptions. San Luis Obispo County could be affected by a tsunami caused by fault related ground displacement on a local, near or offshore fault (such as the Hosgri), or on a more distant fault. Common sources of tsunamis affecting California in the past have been earthquakes on faults off the coast of Chile and the North American coast (up to Alaska). The tsunami hazard for the San Luis Obispo County coastal areas is greatest for those communities or portions of communities located below the estimated elevations for the 100- to 500-year events, that is, below elevation 24 and 39 feet above mean sea level, respectively. In general, much of the coastline of San Luis Obispo County is protected from tsunami hazards by wide beaches, coastal dunes, or sea cliffs that provide protection to coastal developments. Run-up and inundation modeling and mapping, done by the University of Southern California (USC) under contract to Cal OES in 2005 and 2006, indicates a general potential maximum inundation elevation of 40 feet above mean sea level. However, undersea geology or bathymetry and local natural or manmade structures may alter this estimate and the county has decided to utilize an inundation of 50 feet above mean sea level for emergency planning purposes. DCPP is designed for storm surge waves of 36 feet and tsunami waves of 20 feet (source: Diablo Canyon Independent Safety Committee’s (DCISC) 15th Annual Report, 2004- 2005). In 1981, DCPP experienced a 31-foot storm surge. Diablo Canyon does include tsunami response planning as part of its emergency planning activities, as does the County. DCPP is in direct contact not only with the County as it relates to tsunami warnings, but also has direct communication with the California Emergency Management Agency’s State Warning Center. DCPP’s procedures may include a Notification of an Unusual Event from either a tsunami warning or observation of low or high waters levels at the intake structure being indicative of a tsunami. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 31 Activation of the tsunami plan provides for immediate implementation of situation reporting, evacuation and/or damage assessment efforts by local, state, volunteer and private organizations along the coastline. A more detailed explanation of the organizational structure, command authority, responsibilities, functions and interactions required to mitigate the effects of a tsunami is located in the County Tsunami Plan. 32 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SECTION 4 – EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 1. COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION By State law, all public agency employees in California are “disaster service workers.” San Luis Obispo County Codes states “All officers and employees of this county …. shall constitute the emergency organization of this county” (County Code 2.80.110) The County Emergency Organization responding to a radiological emergency will be similar to the emergency organization designed to respond to other emergencies under the San Luis Obispo County Emergency Operations Plan. (See Figure 4.1.1) The individual in charge of the County during an emergency is the Emergency Services Director, who is the County Administrator. Should the Director of Emergency Services (commonly referred to as Emergency Services Director), who is the County Administrative Officer be unavailable or unable to serve, the following succession order shall be followed, except under the conditions identified in the following paragraph, to serve in the role of Emergency Services Director: 1. Assistant County Administrative Officer 2. County OES Principal Administrative Analyst 3. County Sheriff 4. Health Agency Director 5. County Health Officer 6. County General Services Agency Director 7. On Duty Sheriff’s Watch Commander until relieved by a higher ranking Sheriff’s Department employee. Should a vacancy occur in one of the above positions other than County Administrator or Assistant County Administrative Officer, the County Administrator may remove that position from the line of succession until such time as the person filling that position has sufficient knowledge of the County, including the County's emergency organization and related procedures, to perform the duties of alternate Emergency Services Director. That determination shall be made by the County Administrator or Assistant County Administrative Officer with possible input from other members of the County's emergency organization. The Emergency Services Director may also remove any alternate ESD from the line of succession should conditions develop which would make it in the best interest of the emergency organization of the county. In implementing the Plan, the Emergency Services Director is the ranking individual in the Command Group, which is described in more detail below. The Emergency Services Director is responsible for assuring continuity of resources and the county's capability of 33 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 continuous (24-hour) operations for a protracted period. County departments participating actively in responding to an emergency are classified into five groups, according to function: • Command • Operations • Planning and Intelligence • Logistics • Finance and Administration 1.1 Command The Command Group includes those responsible for directing the emergency response and will function as a Unified Command. Within this group are those individuals with authority to order actions in accordance with the county emergency ordinance, to proclaim a LOCAL EMERGENCY, to request declaration of a STATE OF EMERGENCY, and to enact emergency proclamations. The County Board of Supervisors acts in an advisory/approval role to the Command Group. 1.2 Operations Section The Operations Section includes those functions that coordinate and provide support to field response and direct emergency response actions. As an example, the Law Enforcement Branch and Fire/Rescue Branch help coordinate field operations, while a primary responsibility of the Public Works and Utilities Branch is to mobilize and allocate transit resources as necessary and to support traffic flow by setting traffic control barricades and/or emergency road repairs. In addition to the Operations Section members in these functions, some additional participating agency representatives include Schools Districts, the American Red Cross, State Parks and Port San Luis. See Figure 4.1.2 for Operations Section Organization Chart. 1.3 Planning and Intelligence Section 1.3.1 Those who provide specialized technical information and advice including County Counsel and personnel from the County Planning Department and County Agricultural Department responsible for providing Geographical Information System (GIS) information. 1.3.2 Various County personnel responsible for collecting and disseminating information (Documentation Unit). 1.3.3 Situation Reporting and Advanced Planning from Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC). 34 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 1.3.3.1 The Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC) is the area where radiological data is collected and assessed by various agency representatives who make joint recommendations to the County Health Officer, Emergency Services Director and Command Group. County members of the UDAC are from Environmental Health, the Air Pollution Control District and the County Department of Agriculture. Additional UDAC members are from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and Cal OES, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), etc., and technical representatives from DCPP. The county workers in the UDAC report to the Director of Environmental Health who is designated as the UDAC Coordinator. 1.3.3.2 The duties as assigned to county staff who are UDAC members are described in the Environmental Health Division SOPs (III.06) and HP SOPs. 1.4 Logistics Section The Logistics Section enables the County Emergency Organization to function effectively. County General Services (facilities, purchasing) acts as the Logistics Section Chief. Additional technical communication support staff are personnel with specialized areas of responsibility such as the County Information Technology Department (communications and computers), and the Communications Unit. 1.5 Finance and Administration Section The Finance and Administration section is responsible for financial and cost aspects of the incident that are not assigned or included with other incident functions. Staff members may include Auditor-Controller or Assistant Auditor- Controller or Principal Administrative Analyst. Additional duties would be to track personnel time reports, compensation and claims. This section may function from a different location other than the EOC. 2. INTERAGENCY ORGANIZATION Interagency lines of communication between the county and cities, state departments, federal departments and DCPP/PG&E are indicated in Figure 4.2. This figure shows fundamental lines of communication and coordination. In practice, there would be many additional linkages, especially at the operational level (such as the city police departments and Sheriff's Department working with the California Highway Patrol for traffic control). 35 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 As illustrated, the Command Group, with assistance from Plans and Operations Sections, will be the coordinating unit for dealing with outside agencies. Some of the key lines of coordination are: ● with the City Managers (or emergency services personnel) of the incorporated cities to coordinate county wide response actions. ● with Santa Barbara County and the City of Santa Maria. The Santa Barbara County and/or Santa Maria City may send a representative to the EOC to serve as an Agency Representative. • with DCPP in the exchange of information, implementation of protective measures and public information activities. ● with the California Office of Emergency Services in coordinating state and federal level assistance to the county (such as California Department of Public Health, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (FEMA), Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Energy, etc.). Direct coordination with key local offices of state agencies will be assured through representation of the California Highway Patrol (CHP), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), California Men's Colony (CMC), and California State Parks in the County EOC. The initial point of contact between DCPP and the county will be direct communications to the Sheriff's Watch Commander from the plant site. If an ALERT or higher emergency level is declared, DCPP will activate the Technical Support Center (TSC) and take steps to activate the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF). Prior to EOF activation emergency notifications/messages to the county will come either from the Control Room or the TSC to the Sheriff’s Department Watch Commander. The EOF will have an initial contingent of three assigned persons from DCPP’s staff: ● Advisor to the County Emergency Organization ● Public Information Officer ● Technical Advisor assigned to the Joint Information Center When fully staffed, the EOF will include the Emergency Director who has overall responsibility for the direct management of DCPP’s and PG&E’s response to the emergency. Other DCPP technical staff will be assigned to coordinate with the county. Adjacent to the Sheriff's Department (located next to the EOC) is Camp San Luis Obispo, a California National Guard Facility. If outside resources provided by the State or Federal government agencies are brought in, the National Guard will activate the facility as a logistical support base to provide office space and accommodations. Provisions have been made for the federal response to the local area. Office space is provided for FEMA in the EOF. Telephones to meet the NUREG-0654 requirements are 36 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 provided. The nearest airport is the San Luis Obispo Airport which is approximately 8 miles from the EOC/EOF. Alternate airports are in Santa Maria to the south and Paso Robles to the north. 3. LINES OF AUTHORITY Authority documents are indicated in Section 1.4. This section highlights important legal considerations involved in the implementation of the Plan. 3.1 Direction of County Emergency Response The direction of emergency response rests with the County Emergency Services Director, who has the authority to make use of the broad powers spelled out in the county code. The County Administrative Officer (CAO) is the Emergency Services Director (ESD). A line of succession approved by the County Board of Supervisors indicates who will assume that role if the CAO is unavailable (See Section 4.1). 3.2 Proclamation of Local Emergency The Emergency Services Director is empowered to proclaim a Local Emergency if the Board of Supervisors is not in session. (The Board of Supervisors must ratify the proclamation within seven days.) If in session, the Board of Supervisors must pass the proclamation of emergency. 3.3 Proclamation of State of Emergency The Chairperson of the Board of Supervisors is empowered to request that the Governor declare a "State of Emergency" when the locally available resources are inadequate to cope with the emergency. (If the Chairperson is unavailable, the ESD is empowered to make the request.) If a STATE OF EMERGENCY has been declared, all state agencies operate under the direction of the Governor. This effectively centralizes all emergency operations of State agencies. 4. COMMAND AND CONTROL ASSIGNMENTS The following tasks of overall command and control of the County emergency response are assigned to the Command Group: 4.1 Operate the County Emergency Operations Center. 37 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 4.2 Direct the overall emergency response of the County and the cities within the EPZ. 4.3 Exercise powers as necessary to respond to the emergency. 4.4 Serve as point of contact for state and federal agency leaders. 4.5 Serve as point of contact for DCPP/PG&E. 4.6 Evaluate the emergency situation. 4.7 Supervise the alert, notification and dissemination of emergency instructions to the public. 4.8 Direct the implementation of protective actions. 4.9 Ensure that adequate administrative, technical and material resources are available or are requested including the following: 4.9.1 Local resources: 4.9.1.1 Through the direction of county departments and EOC Logistics. 4.9.1.2 Through mutual aid and cooperation with the cities and other local jurisdictions. 4.9.1.3 Through the use of private resources and volunteers. 4.9.2 State and mutual aid, including California National Guard. 4.9.3 Federal aid or assistance, if needed. 4.10 Provide direction to Section Chefs to ensure response is carried out. 4.11 Set priorities if multiple emergencies exist. 38 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SECTION 5 – CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS The following is an overview of the emergency operations as outlined in this plan. Specific steps to "implement" the operations of various Departments, Agencies, and Jurisdictions are located in PART THREE of the Plan, which is made up of initial Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). 1. INITIAL EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION (PLAN ACTIVATION CRITERIA) The Plan will be activated by the Sheriff’s Department Watch Commander after receiving and verifying the notification. The Watch Commander will have and may use an Emergency Notification Form to assist in receiving emergency information details. The county can be notified that there is a problem at Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP) by two different methods The first method is the plant’s Control Room notifying the County Sheriff's Department Watch Commander's Desk (which is staffed 24 hours a day) via the dedicated telephone line. Alternate / backup communications include a two-way radio system and commercial telephones. The second method is the California Emergency Management Agency, which maintains 24-hour staffing at the State Warning Center in Sacramento. Upon receipt of security related information or indications from the independent near site/offsite radiation monitoring system and remote alarm indicators;10 Cal OES would immediately contact the county, the utility, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). They will resolve with the county, the utility, and the NRC the appropriate initial response to be taken by the county. Unless otherwise indicated, this condition shall be responded to as if it were a Notification of Unusual Event. This will ensure that the county will activate the appropriate response personnel to respond to this situation. Within 15 minutes of the declaration of an Emergency Classification Level (ECL), DCPP will transmit to the county all of the information required for initial assessment. The response will be in accordance with Emergency Classification Level accident classification system, to ensure there is no misunderstanding as to the severity of the situation. Table 3.7 summaries the actions taken by both the county and DCPP/PG&E at each of the Emergency Classification Levels. Detailed response actions are contained in the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for each emergency position/function. Implementation of protective actions will be coordinated by local jurisdictions and County EOC as directed by the County Emergency Services Director. 1.1 Security Events at DCPP 10 These systems are installed as specified by California Health and Safety Code, “Radiation Monitoring Devices for Nuclear Power Plants” (Division 20, Chapter 7.1, Sections 25620-25624) 39 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Notification of a security event or hostile action at DCPP will be initiated by a 9-1-1 call for assistance to the Sheriff’s Dispatch Center or Sheriff Watch Commander. Onsite assistance will be provided as requested. Activation of emergency response facilities will continued to be based on the declaration of an Emergency Classification Level of Alert or higher. 2. NOTIFICATION AND MOBILIZATION A summary of response actions following an Emergency Classification notification regarding Diablo Canyon Power Plant is described in Part One, Section 3 and in Table 3- 9. Notification procedures are described in detail at the individual department level in Part Three, Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). At the time of initial contact with the county, DCPP is required to furnish relevant information concerning the emergency situation. The initial assessment is to include, as appropriate: ● information on plant status and projected status, ● assistance requested to DCPP via “911” ● radiological release status, ● meteorological conditions, ● Protective Action Recommendations, if any The Standard Operating Procedures and county/utility emergency classification system11 will help determine which personnel are notified and mobilized. Emergency response personnel will be notified to stand by and/or mobilize to implement the provisions of this Plan consistent with the Emergency Classification Level categories. For example, at a Notification of Unusual Event, County Office of Emergency Services personnel will be notified to stand by and monitor conditions. In the event that conditions at the plant degrade to more serious action levels, additional emergency response personnel will be notified (per SOP) to standby or be dispatched to initiate preparatory functions. For example, at an ALERT level or higher, the emergency personnel will take immediate steps to activate the Emergency Operations Center (including the Unified Dose Assessment Center) and the Joint Information Center. Primary notification and confirmation is to be by telephone in a "cascade" fashion. Some workers may also be notified by radios, pagers, or tone alert radios and/or have contact numbers where they are reachable on a 24-hour basis. A radio notification may provide a backup to the telephone system.12 Some county departments, schools, medical and other institutions can be provided information by means of a monitor radio with tone alert. In order to minimize the time required to mobilize key personnel, call lists are prioritized. 11 See Table 3.7; “Summary of Actions at the Four Emergency Classification Levels” 12 Exception to this method of operation is with fire and law services, which use two-way radios as a primary notification means, with telephone backup. 40 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 3. INFORMATION ACQUISITION AND SITUATION REPORTING 3.1 Plant Conditions and Radiological Information At ALERT or greater, the county continuously assesses the offsite consequences caused by the possible release of an airborne radioactive plume and recommends the implementation of measures to protect the general public. The county acquires information from both DCPP (concerning onsite events and offsite consequences) and the Joint Field Monitoring Teams (FMT). 3.2 Offsite Situations In any situation where there is a potential for an offsite release (Emergency Classification Level of ALERT or greater), the county will take steps to independently confirm the plant's assessment. The initial response will be to dispatch Joint Field Monitoring Teams to predetermined locations depending on meteorological conditions or place on standby as the situation requires. The county may also provide a representative from Environmental Health to work in the DCPP Offsite Emergency Lab (OEL), which provides more sophisticated instrumentation than hand-held devices. The field monitoring teams will attempt to verify that a release has not occurred or will measure the magnitude and direction of the release. This effort will be expanded if measurements or projections indicate the possibility of a release of significance in offsite areas. Augmentation for the Field Monitoring Teams will primarily come from the U.S. Department of Energy, which coordinates federal radiological assistance. Arrival of outside resources will be in a three-to-eight-hour time frame. Additional state and federal assistance will respond, as resource requests and the situation requires. The offsite radiological assessment capabilities during the plume phase will be centralized through the establishment of a Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC) in the co-located County EOC and the DCPP/PG&E Emergency Operations Facility (EOF). The UDAC will bring the county, utility, state and federal dose assessment participants who are involved in offsite dose assessment together with accident data. This data will form the basis for protective action recommendations which will be provided to, discussed among and decided upon by the County Command Group. The UDAC Coordinator, the County Environmental Health Director or designee, will be responsible for presenting the findings and recommendations of the UDAC to the County Unified Command Group. In accordance with state guidelines, during the plume phase of the emergency, the county has the responsibility for assessing the consequences caused by the passage of an airborne radioactive plume and for implementing precautionary 41 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 and/or protective measures. The assessment of longer-term effects such as the subsequent intake of radioactive materials through contaminated food and water supplies, as well as liquid releases having the potential for offsite consequences, is the responsibility of the state.13 The determination of exposure from the direct (airborne plume) radiation pathway will involve field measurement of direct gamma exposure rates, airborne concentrations of radionuclide particulates and radioiodine, and measurements of radiation exposure rates resulting from the deposition of radioactive material on surfaces. The county will provide appropriately equipped Field Monitoring Teams. The CA Department of Public Health and the federal government will provide supplementary technical expertise and long-term monitoring support. Accident assessment will begin upon indication of an abnormal condition at the plant. In the initial hours, the county and the utility will be involved. If an emergency condition with the potential for an offsite release remains four to six hours after the initial declaration, the county assessment effort will be augmented by state and federal assistance. (See Figure 5-1) Additional state and federal accident assessment personnel will arrive should the emergency continue beyond the first day, and such personnel will also be incorporated into the decision making process. DCPP assessment capabilities include field monitoring teams, offsite laboratory, meteorological data collection towers, onsite and offsite monitors, and health physics and other assessment personnel assisted by the computer based Emergency Assessment and Response System (EARS). DCPP/PG&E Emergency Response Organization (ERO) personnel at the Technical Support Center (TSC, may provide the County with some initial data and projections. However, upon activation of the EOF, data and projections will be the responsibility of the EOF and UDAC. Information will include the following: ● Plant Status and Conditions ● Radioactive Releases (Onsite) ● Offsite Radiation Measurements ● Meteorological Conditions ● Dose Projections ● Protective Actions Recommendations Initially, this information will be transmitted directly from the power plant to the Sheriff's Department. For all Emergency Classification Levels at ALERT or greater, the county will staff the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and UDAC including Field Monitoring Teams from the County Environmental Health 13 See ‘Ingestion Pathway Responsibilities,” Section 5,13 42 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Division. The utility will send a representative to act as an Advisor to the County in the EOC and also send personnel and Field Monitoring Teams to UDAC and the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) to allow face-to-face interaction with the county. Upon activation of the EOF (by the utility) and the EOC (by the County), the Sheriff's Watch Commander will be relieved from the duty of receiving notifications, status reports and from the duty of responding to protective action recommendations received from the power plant. Information will then be routed to the County through the EOF. The DCPP Advisor to the County emergency organization is responsible for ensuring information continues to be received by the County in a timely manner. The County Command Group will: 3.2.1 Continue to collect information, projections and recommendations from TSC and/or EOF. Although Protective Action Recommendations will be considered, the County Command Group may not implement any decision. 3.2.2 Continue to coordinate with and collect information from the Cal OES Warning Center, as needed. 3.2.3 Request federal assistance through the state in monitoring and assessment if the emergency level is “ALERT” or greater. (Channel requests through State Warning Center if no Cal OES representative is present in the EOC.) 3.2.4 Oversee the dispatch of and subsequent receipt of initial field data from the Joint Field Monitoring Teams. 3.2.5 Consult with UDAC (if operational) or with Cal OES concerning radiological consequences and determine if there are any recommendations for protective action. Upon arrival of the UDAC Coordinator or alternate and appropriate staff at the county EOC, the UDAC will be in operation, and radiological assessment responsibility will rest with this individual as UDAC Coordinator. Within four to eight hours, personnel from the California Department of Public Health will arrive to assist in sample analysis, data interpretation, advising the UDAC coordinator, and preparation of dose estimates. In the longer term, their primary function will be to direct the sampling effort for the protection of food and water supplies in conjunction with the County's Agricultural Commissioner’s office. Also within four to eight hours, the U.S. Department of Energy Aerial Monitoring Team can be collecting data by airborne means, if needed. Information acquisition and accident assessment will take place continuously from the time of initial indication of an accident. To maintain this function while the county emergency organization is forming, the county's initial assessment 43 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 rests with the personnel on duty at the Sheriff's Department at time of initial indication of a potential accident. 4. PUBLIC ALERTING, NOTIFICATION, AND INFORMATION Primary responsibility for prompt alert and notification of the public lies with the County.14 Notification of the public involves both alerting that an emergency condition exists and the issuance of instructions to the public so that protective actions may be implemented. For more information on public alert and notification, see the DCPP Design Report for Alert and Notification of the Public. 4.1 Public Alerting and Notification When protective actions are issued, an area-wide siren system, designated as the Early Warning System (EWS) within the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ), will alert members of the general public to go indoors and tune their radios and televisions to any local station to receive emergency information and instructions through the Emergency Alert System (EAS). The siren system has the ability to activated by single siren, groups, by PAZ, or all sirens. The Command Group will decide which sirens to sound. The County Public Information Manager (PIM) will develop emergency instructions based on the Command Group decisions. The emergency information will be approved and signed by the Emergency Services Director or designee prior to release. The County EOC Plans Section Situation Status Unit will inform public safety dispatchers or EOCs prior to activation of the Emergency Warning System sirens. The EAS operator will activate the EAS system to broadcast the approved emergency information at the conclusion of the sounding sirens. The County Public Information Officer (PIO) will release the same approved emergency information to the media at the Joint Information Center (JIC). The State Department of Parks, County Sheriff’s Department, Port San Luis Harbor District, County Fire and incorporated personnel from city police, fire, and other departments as necessary and , depending upon the jurisdiction, will carry out the appropriate notifications, as needed. Isolated rural population and transients may be notified by vehicles with mobile public address systems assisted by helicopter surveillance and warning, as available. 14 See Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants, Appendix 3, “Means for Providing Prompt Alerting and Notification of Response Organizations and the Population, “ U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG 0654, Revision 1, November 1980. 44 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Those at sea on commercial or pleasure craft will be notified by marine radio broadcast from the US Coast Guard. Assistance can be provided by air resources as available. Institutions such as hospitals, nursing homes, and schools may be notified individually via telephone or tone-alert radio with instructions regarding the recommended protective action to be taken. Upon such notification, these institutions will implement their internal emergency response procedures in response to the recommended protective action. Initially, during an emergency, both local residents and persons traveling through the area will be on the area roads. These local travelers will be advised of the emergency conditions through news releases and Emergency Alert System messages. Non-local travelers can be diverted from entering the planning area. Roadblocks outside the perimeter of the planning area may be established depending on the situation. For limited numbers of the special populations – those individuals on the Evacuation Assistance List - phone calls, TTY service, or patrol car visits, as appropriate, will be made. This list is developed from cards returned by citizens who receive the annual emergency information calendar (See Section 5.9.1). Independent living individuals unable to evacuate themselves due to a disability or medical need must return a card each year to remain on the list. Individuals who do not return their card are contacted directly by County Office of Emergency Services for follow-up. The notification system to alert, inform and guide the public has three components: 4.1.1 Notification of the Public Regarding the Emergency One of the ways to alert and notify the public of an emergency at Diablo Canyon Power Plant during an ALERT or greater Emergency Classification Level is through the use of print media. For example, information about early actions to move school children from selected schools near the plant could be provided through the media without the use of the Early Warning Systems sirens. Depending upon the sequence and timing of any safety degradation at the plant, the Emergency Services Director or Public Information Manager (PIM) may provide emergency information to the public using the local Emergency Alert System, and to apprise schools, hospitals and institutions of the conditions at the plant through the use of tone alert radios and or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) all hazards radio system. 45 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 4.1.2 Public Warnings In the event a Protective Action Decision is made for Protective Action Zones (PAZ) to evacuate or shelter in place, warning of the area population can be accomplished by sounding an area-wide outdoor siren system.15 The siren system is activated from the County Sheriff's Watch Commander’s Office, EOC Operations, or the backup location in San Luis Obispo. Sounding the sirens is not a signal to evacuate, but is a signal used alerting of the public to go indoors, turn on a radio or a television to a local station and receive specific information and instructions through use of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) messages. Even though the siren system covers a wide area around the plant, certain population groups may require additional alerting. For example, persons on beaches and in public parks may not have ready access to radios. In these areas, mobile vehicles with public address systems may be used to alert and provide specific instructions. In some isolated areas including portions of Montana De Oro State Park, additional notifications may be carried out with the use of mobile public address systems on a California Highway Patrol helicopter or with Sheriff's Department’s vehicles. In many situations, these areas will be closed prior to the Protective Action Decision being implemented. Commercial and pleasure craft off the coast will be notified via marine radio broadcast and by the U.S. Coast Guard on Marine 16. 4.1.3 Public Guidance Information Immediately following the activation of the siren system, local radio and television stations will broadcast the EAS message with specific guidance information relative to: • That an emergency exists at DCPP • Who is issuing the information • Where to get additional information • To stay tuned and additional information as necessary This guidance information will be broadcast regularly and updated as conditions warrant. The use of EAS messaging may be used without using the Emergency Warning System (EWS) 15 In some instances this may be done at the Site Area Emergency level, at the discretion of the Command Group 46 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 If there is a change in the protective action decision, the siren system will again be activated and additional instructions will be broadcast to the public. 4.2 Public Information In addition to the Emergency Alert System message content, the county will provide clear and prompt information, such as traffic advisories during an evacuation, or additional measures to be taken to protect against radiation inhalation. Information of this nature will be disseminated from the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) by the County Emergency Alert Systems Operator at the EOC and to the media by the County Public Information Officer at the Joint Information Center (JIC). Another method of providing information to the public is through the use of social networks, such as Twitter and Facebook and the County Office of Emergency Services website. The use of social media is another channel allowing recipients to receive emergency notifications beyond those methods of traditional alerting systems. All users who are members of the appropriate network may receive the alert. Social media messages will most often be generated from the Joint Information Center and EOC and overseen by the PIM or designee Because multiple and redundant alerting channels ensure maximum reach of the population in the event of an emergency, alerting via web-based channels allows social network users to receive critical alerts from their trusted organizations. Links can also be provided to sites that are delivering critical information and updates on the emergency. Any social media will be purely as supplemental information source. 4.2.1 NOTIFICATION OF UNUSUAL EVENT At this level, the EOC and JIC are not activated. Accordingly, the Emergency Services Director (ESD) is responsible for the gathering and release of public information concerning the situation, if necessary. The ESD coordinates with a PIO, the County Office of Emergency Services Coordinators, and DCPP media relations representatives if necessary. 4.2.2 ALERT or Greater Emergency Classification Level The designated County PIO, in coordination with the designated DCPP/PG&E personnel, will take steps to activate the Joint Information Center (JIC) located on Kansas Avenue, close to the EOC and EOF. The Joint Information Center will include: 4.2.2.1 An area for media briefings. 47 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 4.2.2.2 A Media Communications Area with telephone facilities for use by the media. 4.2.2.3 A Public Information Center gathering area for use by County, Utility and various agencies’ PIOs and staff collecting information and coordinating with other representatives in preparation of news releases. 4.2.2.4 A Phone Assistance Center/Rumor Control (see point 4.2.3 below for details). The County Command Group shall initiate and authorize public information releases. An approval of a news release will require the authorization of the Emergency Services Director, or others delegated this authority by the ESD. The County PIM will be responsible for the release of information to the media under the supervision of the County Command Group. The County PIO will serve as the County Spokesperson regarding county actions in response to the emergency. Prior to release, county information will be coordinated, as much as possible, with other involved parties, including DCPP, local, state, and federal agencies. No other participating emergency response organization, or agency, should make any public announcement which directly concerns or affects the local county situation without coordinating with the County PIO, PIM or ESD. Participating emergency response agencies and organizations may send qualified representatives to media briefings concerning their agency/organization actions. In addition to the County PIO, a knowledgeable senior government official may be sent to the Joint Information Center by the County Command Group to participate in media briefings, as soon as this is feasible. In addition, PG&E will establish an alternate media center in San Francisco, for the purpose of responding to telephone calls from the media. Information released in San Francisco will be consistent with the information that is released in San Luis Obispo. 4.2.3 Phone Assistance Center (PAC) - RUMOR CONTROL FUNCTION At ALERT or greater Emergency Classification Level, the County Social Services Director will staff the PAC located in the Public Information Center portion of the JIC. The JIC staff will provide current information to the PAC staff, including copies of all news releases and EAS messages. 48 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 The PAC also performs the rumor control function by identifying misinformation or trends of inquiries and relays this information to the County PIM. A rumor identified by the PAC and relayed to the PIM is checked, through the County Emergency Operations Center/PIM. Rumors that have the potential to adversely affect the response to the emergency should be dispelled through the use of accurate information released to the media by the County Public Information function. 5. PRECAUTIONARY AND PROTECTIVE ACTIONS Various actions may be implemented. They include precautionary actions; actions to shield people from radioactive material (sheltering) or actions to remove people from the area where a health hazard exists (evacuation). 5.1 Precautionary Actions Precautionary actions are those steps that can effectively be taken without significant social or economic impact on the area residents while providing increased preparedness in the event of a potential emergency or hazard. These actions may be initiated well in advance of a projected offsite emergency condition and may include some or all of the following: ● Closure of beaches and state ● Mobilization and/or dispatching of bus(es) to standby at appropriate school(s) for possible relocation. ● Restriction of hospital patient admittance to emergency cases only. ● Cancellation of school classes or school closures. ● Relocation of public schools closest to the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. ● Rescheduling of other activities expected to draw large numbers of transients into the area. ● Release of information that the county is monitoring the situation and may recommend protective actions for the public if necessary. These precautionary measures can be instituted when it has been determined that safety issue at the plant presents an onsite emergency condition; even through no offsite hazard is projected to occur. Measures such as closure of state parks and relocation of public schools closest to the plant enhance the counties preparedness. By taking early precautions both vehicles and personnel are available for other emergency responses if the event escalates to a level that requires protective actions. The use of the Early Warning System sirens are not used for precautionary actions, though the use of the EAS can be used as appropriate. 5.2 Protective Actions - Sheltering In Place 49 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 The non-institutionalized population may be sheltered in-place, as a precautionary action, by following emergency instructions received over local radio and television stations. The instructions will tell the population to stay indoors and close doors and windows, if sheltering is ordered. In the event an actual release requires additional safety measures, supplemental emergency instructions will be issued detailing protective measures to be taken, such as sealing off cracks and other openings, turning off ventilation systems, and other forms of improvised protection. Similar measures can be taken within institutions, according to their plans. Public schools districts within the EPZ have sheltering in place procedures in their district’s school Standard Operating Procedures. Hospitals follow their own shelter in place procedures. Should releases occur which would deposit sufficient quantities of radioactive materials in populated areas, sheltered populations would be relocated (i.e., evacuated after plume passage)16. If such a situation were to occur, the County would secure the affected areas. Evacuees would be monitored and decontaminated as necessary. In this instance, significant outside assistance through mutual aid from state and federal resources would be required. 5.3 Evacuation The sole purpose of evacuation is to remove the population from the affected areas as rapidly and safely as possible to locations beyond the health hazard limits. Evacuation Routes are found in Section 3.4. The area population is grouped into four categories according to how they evacuate: ● Auto-owning population, defined as those who ride out of the area in private automobiles. This population segment includes all members of car-owning households (except school children, if schools are in session). ● Public school population (if schools are in session), defined as all children at public schools, County Office of Education and California State Preschool schools. This population is evacuated directly from schools, in school buses, under the control of the school staff if they have not been relocated in advance or if there is an order to evacuate. • Private school and non-California State Preschool students, defined as all children attending private or non-public funded schools. In regards to this Plan, all schools within the EPZ are encouraged to have an emergency response plan that provides information and instructions regarding the care, safety and welfare of the children, personnel and property in the event of an emergency. Protective actions should include sheltering in 16 The potential effectiveness of sheltering followed by relocation is documented in the State study of nuclear power plant accidents and in the planning guidance document which designated the emergency planning zone. 50 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 place, methods of their evacuation and relocations, and how parents will be notified of an emergency. Private schools within the EPZ are notified by the County Office of Education’s notification phone team. ● Non-Auto-Owning population (or carless population), includes all persons in households where a car is not reasonably available for evacuation. Most of this population is evacuated by friends and relatives. Those not evacuated assemble at designated collection points and are evacuated by bus. Those not able to walk to the designated collection points due to a disability or medical need may call the Phone Assistance Center (PAC). (That number is listed in the YP phone book and will also be announced and published in media releases.) ● Population in institutions, defined as primarily those persons in hospitals, nursing homes County Jail, Juvenile Services Center and California Men’s Colony. Following the agency’s specific Standard Operation Procedures, this population may evacuate, if necessary, directly from the institutions using the facility’s buses, special vehicles, or the institution’s staff vehicles. Hospitals follow their own evacuation procedures. The institutional population will be instructed on the evacuation process by the staff of that particular institution. Necessary personal effects will be assembled and essential medical records gathered. Transit vans, other buses and institutional staff vehicles will pick up ambulatory hospital patients, nursing home residents, and other persons not requiring ambulance transportation. These passengers will be transported directly to their host site, medical facility or congregate care center, as appropriate. Non-ambulatory persons will be transported directly from institutions by ambulance and other vehicles. These vehicles will be drawn from local fleets and from in adjacent counties. In specific areas where institutionalized populations cannot evacuate, the County Health Officer may authorize the use of iodine blocking pills made of potassium iodide (KI) for those who remain in affected areas. A summary of the evacuation steps is shown in the table on the following page: 51 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SUMMARY OF EVACUATION STEPS POPULATION SEGMENT ACTION STEPS AND DESCRIPTIONS AUTO-OWNING POPULATION (All members of households, except children at school, having a private vehicle available for evacuation.) 1. RECEIVE NOTIFICATION, including instructions for evacuating 2. LEAVE PLACE OF WORK. 3. TRAVEL FROM WORK TO HOME, similar to normal work trip. 4. PREPARE HOME FOR EVACUATION: Close house, secure property. 5. DRIVE OUT OF THE AREA in private vehicles, using designated routing. SCHOOL POPULATION (All persons in public schools, if not previously relocated) 1. RECEIVE NOTIFICATION, including instructions for evacuating. 2. MOVE ALL STUDENTS INDOORS 3. RELOCATE SCHOOL POPULATION IN BUSES, to pre-designated school relocation centers. NON-AUTO-OWNING POPULATION (CARLESS) (Persons not having a private vehicle available for evacuation.) 1. RECEIVE NOTIFICATION, including instructions for evacuating. 2. PREPARE HOME FOR EVACUATION: Close house, secure property. 3. ASSEMBLE AT COLLECTION POINTS 4. EVACUATE NONAUTO-OWNING POPULATION IN BUSES. PERSONS IN INSTITUTIONS (Hospitals, nursing homes, or medical institutions, etc.) 1. RECEIVE NOTIFICATION, including instructions for evacuating. 2. MOBILE POPULATION, prepare population for evacuation. 3. EVACUATE INSTITUTIONAL POPULATION IN BUSES, STAFF VEHICLES, OR SPECIAL VEHICLES, according to the agency’s Standard Operating Procedures (SOP). Incarcerated Persons 4. RECEIVE NOTIFICATION and institution officials will follow agency’s SOP; if not able to evacuate incarcerated individuals, CHO can authorize the use of potassium iodide (KI). 52 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 5.1.4 Confirmation of Evacuation Evacuation will be confirmed by law enforcement agencies. Confirmation of evacuation will take place both during an evacuation for the purpose of judging the progress and at the end in order to insure completion. Although primarily intended to insure the population has left potential impact areas, confirmation also aids in establishing security control of evacuated areas. 5.1.5 Evacuation of On-Site Personnel Should it become necessary to evacuate personnel from the plant site, DCPP has designated the southern plant access road as a primary evacuation route with a secondary road to the north through Montana De Oro State Park. (See Figure 5.2) Evacuation from the plant site would come in stages with nonessential personnel evacuating first (i.e., visitors, contractor and construction personnel, and any other onsite individuals who do not have an emergency response assignment). On-site personnel are to assemble at designated points for accountability prior to their being released by the DCPP Site Emergency Coordinator. Alternate offsite assembly areas are available for the north: the parking lot by the Ranger's station in Montana De Oro State Park or the Morro Bay Power Plant, and to the south: the Port San Luis Harbor parking lot adjacent to the plant gate at Avila Beach, the Avila Beach parking lot, or the PG&E Energy Education Center on the frontage road (Ontario Road) at the San Luis Bay Drive exit and U.S. 101.17 In the case of an on-site evacuation of DCPP personnel “...an estimated 900 [personal] vehicles would be instructed to evacuate the site, with some personnel remaining on-site for emergency action.”18 County assistance to an on-site evacuation includes the County Command Group providing requested support, as available, to DCPP and notifying off-site locations/operations that may be impacted 5.1.6 Actions During a Security Event Should a security event occur at DCPP, actions to protect the health and safety of the public from that event may be necessary. Any actions necessary will be directed and implemented by the Incident Commander responsible for the security event. Any actions necessary due to the security event, are not considered Protective Action Decisions and will not require the use of the siren system or EAS. Should the security event 17 For details regarding DCPP/PG&E procedures, see the Diablo Canyon Power Plant Units 1 and 2 Emergency Plan, Section 6.4 Protective Actions. 18 Final Report Evacuation Time Assessment for Transient and Permanent Population from Various Areas Within the Plume Exposure Pathway Emergency Planning Zone. Wilbur Smith. September 2002. pg. 36. 53 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 escalate to cause a potential or actual radiological emergency, the County EOC will implement plans and procedures to provide for the health and safety of the public and Protective Action Decisions make be directed. Note* Due to the remote location of DCPP, a security event at the plant may have minimal impact on surrounding areas. 7. TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT The County Unified Command will initiate actions to establish traffic control during the evacuation. The California Highway Patrol (CHP) will be responsible for developing the traffic control strategy and for overall management of the traffic control function. In this role, CHP will be responsible for traffic control on all roads in the unincorporated areas of the county, highways and freeways. 7.1 Coordination The CHP Area Commander assigned to the County EOC will coordinate with the County Command Group to confirm the overall sequence of evacuation by zone and roadway utilization. The CHP will be responsible for coordinating with the County Sheriff’s Department, county public works department, Caltrans, and the affected city police departments in implementing traffic control plans for the evacuation. Coordinated departmental traffic management plans have been developed and incorporated as Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). 7.2 Traffic Management within Cities Traffic management has been pre-planned for evacuation routes, alternate routes, and traffic control points within Emergency Planning Zone Cities. The CHP will dispatch personnel to the individual city emergency operation centers to facilitate traffic management coordination as available. During the evacuation, normal traffic operations will generally be maintained. Specifically, two-way streets will continue in two-way operations; traffic signals will continue to function and so forth. Some modifications may be made, however all operations will be implemented and supervised by city police and the California Highway Patrol. During a total area evacuation, there will be considerable traffic congestion on most major roadways. The locations and extent of this traffic congestion are 54 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 described in a separate report.19 Evacuation of most sub areas, such as the Five Cities, would allow traffic on most roads to flow at low speeds. 8. NOTIFICATION OF RESIDENTS Residents in the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) may first be alerted of a DCPP emergency through the use of media releases, social media channels, and through the Early Warning System sirens if there are protective actions. The County is responsible for sounding the sirens if protective actions are directed and has this capability 24 hours per day. The County ensures the Emergency Alert System (EAS) messages are broadcast immediately following the ending of the sounding sirens. The local EAS stations will continue to broadcast EAS messages developed by the county identifying the appropriate protective actions to be taken. If the siren system should fail, backup public alerting (route alerting) and notification procedures have been developed. If sirens within a city's limits fail to sound, the county will inform that City’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) of the siren failure(s). City personnel will respond to the area of the siren failure and alert the public using vehicle- mounted public address systems and bullhorns. City personnel will inform the public to tune to any local radio or television station for emergency instructions. County resources will help as resources allow. 9. HANDLING OF ACCESS AND FUNCTIONAL NEEDS POPULATIONS 9.1 Access and functional needs population The county has created a register of EPZ residents requiring evacuation assistance in the event of an emergency. If a protective action to evacuate is required, the county Phone Assistance Center will place calls to pre-registered individuals and will coordinate with the Transit Unit for those individuals needing transportation. Evacuation transportation assistance for individuals with disability or medical need is arranged through coordination with County EOC Operations Traffic and Evacuations Branch and Med / Health Branch. For individuals not pre-registered, there will be on opportunity for them to call into the Phone Assistance Center during an emergency are request assistance due to a disability or medical need. 9.2 Non Auto-Owning Population A significant portion of the non auto-owning (carless) population will be evacuated as passengers in private cars driven by family, neighbors, or friends. The evacuation procedure for this group is the same as that of the car-owning population. 19 Evacuation Time Assessment for Transient and Permanent Population from Various Areas Within the Plume Exposure Pathway Emergency Planning Zone. Wilbur Smith. 2002 55 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Persons from carless households who do not evacuate as passengers in private cars will assemble at designated collection points. From these collection points buses will transport people to a reception or congregate care center outside the Emergency Planning Zone area. Most of the populations in urban or suburban areas live within 1/2 to 3/4 mile of a collection point and the majority of this population will walk there. Persons unable to walk to the collection point because of a special need, can, by telephone, request transportation service from their homes Transit and other buses (including school buses, when not required for schools) can pick up the evacuees who have assembled at the collection points and take them to the reception or congregate care center outside the area. 10. CONGREGATE CARE In the event of an evacuation, temporary lodging will be required until return is authorized by the state. Most families will likely stay with relatives and friends or seek lodging in hotels and motels. For those who do not wish to use these alternatives, public accommodations will be operated at locations outside of the Emergency Planning Zone. To the north of the area, facilities at Camp Roberts will be established. To the south, a reception center will be opened at Santa Maria Fairpark in the city of Santa Maria. Fairpark in Santa Maria. Both centers provide the following: ● Registration ● Information and assistance in family unification ● Food and lodging (at facility site or a motel voucher) ● Public telephones available if possible ● First aid ● Radiological monitoring (based on the situation) ● Decontamination (based on the situation) 11. EXPOSURE CONTROL, RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING, AND DECONTAMINATION The County Health Officer with the Unified Dose Assessment Center is responsible for recommending protective actions to the County Command Group to prevent or limit exposure to radioactive materials. Radiation Exposure Criteria for both the general population and emergency workers is found in Table 2.2. 11.1 Exposure Control Responsibility 11.1.1 General Population 56 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Responsibility for limiting exposure to the general population begins with the UDAC, who makes protective action recommendations for the public to the County Health Officer based on radiological data assessment. The County Health Officer is responsible for recommending protective actions for the public to the County Command Group for a decision. 11.1.2 Emergency Workers Primary responsibility for monitoring exposure lies with each individual emergency worker. Emergency workers will monitor and record their exposure while in the field. They will relay exposure readings to their respective EWEC Command Centers. If their exposure readings approach any of the dose or exposure limits or designated reporting increments, they will also contact their EWEC Command Centers and at the end of every shift. The EWEC Command Center records the emergency worker exposure and reports the exposures to the Emergency Worker Exposure Control (EWEC) Group personnel, in the EOC. The EWEC personnel will document and maintain emergency worker exposure information. The EWEC Group personnel will inform the County Health Officer of exposures that approach dose and exposure limits. Only the County Health Officer may authorize emergency worker exposure limits in excess of the exposure or dose limits. 11.2 Radiological Monitoring and Decontamination 11.2.1 General Population If there is a significant release of radioactive materials during an evacuation, evacuees may have to be monitored for contamination (deposition of unwanted radioactive material on persons or objects). Trained personnel (mainly or predominately) from DCPP will operate portal monitors and other radiation monitoring equipment at Reception and Congregate Care Centers to determine if any contamination has occurred. Any persons found to be contaminated will be directed to a Decontamination area at the center. These centers are ADA compliant and will accept service animals. Vehicle monitoring will not take place during the emergency phase. At the Decontamination area, documentation will begin and will continue until the person has been decontaminated (reduction or removal of contaminating radioactive material from a person) or referred for medical follow-up. In San Luis Obispo, County Public Health and other agencies’ 57 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 personnel will assist in the evacuee decontamination process. In Santa Maria, Santa Barbara County Public Health and other Santa Barbara County agencies’ personnel will assist in the evacuee decontamination process at Fairpark. DCPP will provide equipment and personnel for evacuee monitoring. Every effort will be made to limit radiation exposures to staff and to limit the spread of contamination. Radioactive waste generated in the course of decontamination will be disposed of in accordance with state and federal regulations. It will be the responsibility of PG&E to properly dispose of radioactive wastes resulting from an accident impacting off-site areas. Depending on the situation, if no radiological release has occurred, Reception and Congregate Care facilities may be opened without Monitoring and Decontamination at the discretion of the County Command Group. 11.2.2 Emergency Workers Emergency Workers who must work in areas affected by a radioactive plume will wear monitoring devices (dosimeters) to ensure that their exposure to radiation will not exceed specified safe limits. In some cases, area monitoring will be permitted in lieu of individual dosimetry. If a release has occurred, Emergency Worker Decontamination Centers will be established to detect and measure contamination and to decontaminate emergency workers if necessary. Decontamination reduces the potentially harmful effects of radiation exposure by removing radioactive material on the surface and prevents internal contamination. 12. EMERGENCY MEDICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH SUPPORT 12.1 Emergency Medical The County Health Officer ensures continued medical services for the public and emergency workers. This includes health care provisions at the Reception and Congregate Care Centers. The County Health Officer may request CDPH, Disaster Medical Services (DMS) to activate the Regional Disaster Medical Health Coordination Plan and provide state-level assistance. 12.2 Handling Contaminated and Injured Patients The County Health Officer will provide overall direction via the Medical/Health Branch for the coordination of hospital emergency plan activation, medical communications and operational decisions as related to the emergency. This includes the immediate transportation and care for individuals whose injuries are complicated by a radiological exposure or contamination. French Hospital in San 58 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Luis Obispo is the primary receiving hospital. Marian Medical in Santa Maria is the backup hospital. The San Luis Obispo County Emergency Medical Services personnel are trained in handling this type of patient. 12.3 Long-Term Medical Follow-up The medical effects, if any, due to radiation exposure would occur over a very long period of time following any exposure. Even for "acute" effects (associated with a larger dose occurring over a short time period), most symptoms would occur within a three-to-six month time period following exposure. However, with very high exposure some symptoms may occur within two weeks. Accordingly, registration of the potentially affected population will be accomplished at the time of emergency, but actual medical effects would, in general, not occur within the time frame of the emergency. Planning and implementation of long-term medical programs are the responsibility of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The County Health Officer will assist the implementation of procedures, in conjunction with state agencies, for follow-up monitoring of the public and emergency workers that may have been exposed to radiation. This will include: 12.3.1 Maintaining exposure and medical records 12.3.2 Providing medical and psychological counseling for individuals with concerns of possible exposure. 12.3.3 Providing medical and therapeutic treatment in the event exposures received warrant such treatment. 13. INGESTION PATHWAY RESPONSIBILITIES Concern about ingestion of contaminated material begins with the release of a radioactive material plume from the nuclear power plant (plume phase). Initial ingestion pathway preventative and hold orders can be put in place by the Command Group during the emergency or plume phase. Protective actions continue into the recovery phase, until the hazard from exposure to radiation through ingestion of contaminated food or water has been mitigated. The County has the lead for public protection during the plume phase when the primary concern is prevention or reduction of immediate exposure from radioactive material. Preventative and hold orders during the plume phase may include but not be limited to: Shelter all livestock (including dairy animals, cows, horses, goats, sheep and pigs) and place on stored feed and water. Shelter all poultry and place on stored feed and water. Stop pumping from outdoor/ uncovered surface water sources Stop all harvest activities including apiaries and backyard gardens Stop field preparations and tillage 59 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Hold dairy products Hold harvested crops Hold livestock and poultry Hold other consumables Cease movement of food The ingestion pathway phase begins at the end of the emergency phase and concurrently with the recovery phase. During the ingestion pathway phase, the concern is with the intake of contaminated food and foodstuffs. The state has the primary response role with support from local and federal government. The California Department of Public Health (is the lead state agency during the ingestion pathway phase and will manage operations from the State Dose Assessment Center (SDAC). Cal OES will support CDPH during this phase. 20 The emphasis for agricultural actions shifts from the county to the CDPH and Cal OES in the Ingestion Pathway phase. The transition occurs when the plume dissipates and the nuclear power plant reactor is declared stable by DCPP/PG&E with the concurrence from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with no further uncontrolled releases anticipated. The State Dose Assessment Center Action Plan will be developed by State/Federal/Local officials with goals, objectives and Federal Radiological Monitoring Assessment Center (FRMAC) capabilities. Based on the results of the State Dose Assessment Center’s (SDAC) sampling and surveys, the initial ingestion pathway protective action recommendations may be modified when the Recovery Interagency Coordination Group (RICG) is formed. In addition to agriculture holds, Certification of Commodities for Market, and destruction and or disposal of crops and produce may be required. The County Agricultural Commissioner’s office will develop sampling plans and agriculture hold plans (See Ingestion Pathway Zone Map Figure 3.3). Other activities requiring enforcement agency intervention or other support will be coordinated with the appropriate County agency. This coordination will help prevent duplication of effort and unnecessary exposure of emergency workers. Protective decisions will be implemented by the agency having jurisdictional authority. Implementation of these decisions will be accomplished utilizing the California Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). 13.1 Establishment of Ingestion Pathway Zone The Ingestion Pathway Zone (IPZ) is designated for planning and protective actions to prevent ingestion pathway exposure. For pre-emergency purposes, the zone encompasses all the area within an approximately 50-mile radius of the plant (Figure 3.3). The actual zone will be determined by plume deposition. The 20 State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan. Governor’s Office of Emergency Services Technical Assistance Section Radiological Preparedness Unit. Section 2.7.4, 2004.. DRAFT San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 60 boundaries will be modified based on aerial survey data and field survey team results and approved by the State/County unified command management. 13.2 Ingestion Pathway Actions During Recovery Actions will continue to be taken during the recovery phase to avoid or reduce exposure to radiation from food or water. The type and amount of radioactivity present, or likely to be present, and the hazard it represents are the triggers for decisions to take actions to protect the public. These actions may include, but are not be limited to: ● Relocating livestock ● Agriculture quarantine holds on crops and livestock ● Holds on use of surface water ● Destruction or disposal of crops ● Certification of agricultural commodities Federal EPA guidance know as Protective Action Guides (PAGs) help determine the projected radiation dose at which public officials should invoke protective actions. When there is a clear, recognizable hazard, initial protective action decisions will be made by State/Federal/County emergency response staff, using standing orders if possible. Where the hazard is low and the best decision unclear, the Recovery Interagency Coordination Group (RICG) (See Section 5.15) will make the final decision. 14. RECOVERY PHASE The Recovery Phase begins at the end of the plume (Emergency) phase. The recovery phase planning will be initiated before the conclusion of the emergency phase, but it will generally not take place until after the initiating conditions of the emergency have stabilized and immediate actions to protect public health and safety and property have been accomplished. The transition occurs when county and state are notified by DCPP/PG&E that the plant has stabilized and no further release is expected, and the NRC has concurred. The State will, on request, assist the County in developing recovery plans. Recovery is the process of assessing radiation levels in the environment and determining acceptable levels for return by the general public for unconditional occupancy or use after the initial phase of the emergency. 21 The objective of the recovery operation is to protect public health by reducing and limiting the amount of exposure to individuals from deposited radioactivity, inhalation of re-suspended radioactive material, and exposure from radioactive isotopes that enter the 21 State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan. Section 1, Administration, 2005. DRAFT San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 61 food chain from the soil, water, crops or livestock feed. The SDAC will develop guidelines for decontamination, waste disposal, for areas or facilities deemed necessary for recovery operations. The authorities having jurisdiction will review and approve guidelines and will develop plans for implementation. The recovery phase is separated into four sub-phases. Each sub-phase may be in progress at the same time. The four sub-phases and a brief description are as follows: 14.1 Reentry Reentry is for essential personnel to reenter a restricted area to perform critical functions. During reentry, survey and sample team members perform detailed radiation dose rate surveys and conduct environmental sampling. The results will be utilized as the basis for protective actions or release to restricted or unrestricted use. 14.2 Restoration Restoration is the process of reducing exposure rates and concentrations in the environment to acceptable levels before unrestricted or restricted use begins. The State will support local and operational area governments in their efforts to restore the community to its pre-emergency condition. 22 The Recovery Unit develops recovery criteria recommendations for the Planning Chief. The Operations Chief will then oversee implementation of the policy to achieve the goal of environmental restoration. 14.3 Return During the Return Phase, individuals are permitted to reoccupy previously restricted areas. Depending on residual exposure rates and the potential for re- suspension of radioactive particles, precautions may be recommended. Evacuated areas must meet radiation protection criteria to allow for return to homes and businesses. SDAC protective action recommendation (PAR) will be based upon EPA guidance. The decision making authorities will use health effect concerns, the PAR and the socio-economic impacts of relocation to issue a protective action decision (PAD) regarding Return. 14.4 Relocation Relocation represents the inability to restore affected areas to unrestricted use. People are removed or excluded from the areas in order to avoid chronic radiation exposures in excess of established limits. Decisions to relocate or attempt to restore will include both technological and socio-economic considerations. 22 State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan. Section 1, Administration, 2005. DRAFT San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 62 The Recovery Plan will be developed during the plume phase and the early stages of the recovery phase. The State/Federal monitoring and assessment group will use data collected by both plume and recovery phase field sampling teams to begin establishing criteria for decontamination and recovery. Dose commitment, community priorities for critical areas such as hospitals, schools, utilities and technical considerations will be included in the proposed plan. The Recovery Interagency Coordination Group (RICG) (described below in 15) will review the draft plan. After it is approved it will be submitted to other state, county and federal officials. If contamination is extensive, the Recovery Plan may be drafted, reviewed and implemented in several phases, with the earliest actions being implemented while the later phases are developed. During the Plume Phase, the implemented protective actions which limited direct or indirect exposure to the general population may be extended during the recovery phase by limiting or restricting access to contaminated areas. These limits are set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Protective Action Guides (PAGs) for relocation.23 See the following chart: RECOVERY PHASE RELOCATION DOSE LIMITS First Year Dose 2 REM Subsequent Yearly Dose 0.5 REM Fifty Year Total Dose 5 REM 15. RECOVERY INTERAGENCY COORDINATION GROUP (RICG) Local and state governments have the primary responsibility for planning and implementing the recovery of the affected area. Recovery planning will be initiated at the request of the State, but it will generally not take place until after the initiating conditions of the emergency have been stabilized and immediate actions to protect public health, safety, and property have been accomplished by the local authorities. The State will, upon request, assist local governments in developing off-site recovery plans, prior to the deactivation of the State response. Cal OES will assemble a Recovery Interagency Coordination Group (RICG) to manage the overall activity of State agencies involved in the recovery process. The RICG will consist of local decision-makers, state agency decision-makers, and necessary administrative staff. The director of the RICG will be appointed by the Cal OES regional administrator to facilitate local decision-makers in the recovery phase. The purpose of the RICG, is to provide the local decision makers with immediate access to state resources to help implement their decisions. The objectives of the RICG will be: 23 Manual of Protective Action Guides and Protective Action for Nuclear Incidents. Appendices E pg. 269- 270.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revised 1991, second printing 1992 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 63 ● To facilitate local decision-makers in the decision process. ● To provide immediate assistance to local decision-makers with implementation of their decisions. ● To give to the decision-making process the perspectives of different state and county agencies. ● To provide a mechanism for ensuring that the affected agencies and counties are kept informed about decisions, through representation on the RICG. Each affected agency and county will be represented on the RICG. This representative will be an elected or appointed official or a staff member authorized to make decisions for the organization. This level of representation is necessary so that decisions can be made and implemented quickly, without requiring numerous levels of review. San Luis Obispo County is represented by the County Health Officer, County Administrator, and County Agricultural Commissioner. Participating agencies and organizations include (but are not limited to): State  California Department of Public Health  Division of Drinking Water and Environmental Management,  Environmental Management Branch,  Division of Food and Drug and Special Radiation Programs • Radiologic Health Branch, • Food and Drug Branch,  Department of Food and Agriculture  California Emergency Management Agency Affected County  Administrative Officer  Health Officer  Agricultural Commissioner  Cal OES Liaison Planning members will serve as staff to the RICG in the event of an accident. Responsibilities of RICG include: ● Recommend priorities for sampling and agriculture quarantine holds of crops, water, or land areas. ● Review and provide analysis of the State/Federal Monitoring and Assessment Group recommendations. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 4, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 64 ● Ensure that consideration is given to intangible effects such as marketplace rejection of any food produced in the area near the accident. ● Resolve conflicts between the economic effects of agriculture quarantine holds and the actual hazards of delaying the holds. ● Consideration of means for continued marketing of agricultural products not affected by the release. ● Assure that the RICG members' organizational responsibilities under the emergency plan are met. ● Assess the varying costs of long-term remedial actions and recommendations. ● Provide consultation and recommendations on recovery plans and operation including decontamination and waste disposal. ● Review and consider approval of State/Federal Monitoring and Assessment Group recommendations dealing with re-entry into evacuated areas, return to evacuated areas, and relocation of population from impacted areas. ● Propose termination of the RICG management and transfer associated functions to appropriate agencies. For the responsibilities of each participating agency and county, see the appropriate emergency plan for each. 65 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 6, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SECTION 6 - EMERGENCY RESOURCES 1. EMERGENCY FACILITIES The county of San Luis Obispo has multiple facilities that may be activated during an emergency at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. The primary facility is the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at 1525 Kansas Ave, in San Luis Obispo. It is co-located with the Sheriff's Department Watch Commander and Dispatch (Public Safety Answering Point-PSAP, Sheriff's Dispatch and MEDCOM) and the Pacific Gas and Electric/Diablo Canyon Power Plant Emergency Operations Facility. The EOC portion of the facility is maintained by Emergency Services Coordinators from the County of San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services. Additional county emergency facilities that may be utilized include: JIC Outside 10 mile zone Joint Information Center Located on Kansas Ave. San Luis Obispo PAC Outside 10 mile zone Phone Assistance Center Located within the JIC on Kansas Ave. San Luis Obispo County Department Public Works Outside 10 mile zone Public Works and Transportation Depart. Located in the Old Court House in San Luis Obispo on Palm Street Various Public Works Maintenance Yards Outside 10 mile zone Two Yards located throughout the county COE Outside 10 mile zone County Office of Education Located on Hwy. 1 Across from Cuesta College CHA DOC Outside 10 mile zone County Health Agency Department Operation Center (Medical/Health Branch) Located in San Luis Obispo on Johnson Ave, Fire Emergency Command Center (ECC) Outside 10 mile zone County Fire Emergency Command Center Located on Hwy. 1 County Govt. Center Outside 10 mile zone Located on Monterey Street Downtown San Luis Obispo 66 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 6, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 CHP Area Office And Dispatch Center Outside 10 mile zone California Highway Patrol Located in San Luis Obispo California Blvd. Sheriff’s substation Los Osos Substation within 10 mile zone County Sheriff’s Department Headquarters and 3 stations throughout the county DPR Dispatch Facility Outside 10 mile zone CA State Parks Central Communications Monterey County CALTRANS District Dispatch Outside 10 mile zone California Department of Transportation Located on Higuera Street San Luis Obispo Communications Shop Outside 10 mile zone County Information Technology Department Located on Kansas Ave San Luis Obispo ARC Outside 10 mile zone American Red Cross Chapter Office Located on Prado Road in San Luis Obispo RACES Outside 10 mile zone Fixed equipment at various locations throughout the county OEL Outside the 10 mile zone Offsite Emergency Laboratory Located at the PG&E Service Center Lower Higuera Street San Luis Obispo 2. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 2.1 Overview This preparedness function will be coordinated by Cal OES and San Luis Obispo County OES. 2.1.1 Scope The following equipment testing and calibration criteria will be applied to all equipment required for the implementation of the Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan. 67 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 6, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 2.2 Criteria 2.2.1 All Equipment The equipment and instruments including motor vehicles, communication or data processing equipment, and the like, which are in regular non- emergency use by public or private agencies and organizations, but would be required in order to implement a response to a nuclear power plant emergency, will be tested as follows: 2.2.1.1 Manufacturer's recommendations for periodic testing and calibration should be carried out. The necessary testing and calibration instruments, tools, and technically competent personnel for this purpose may be available in the county, or arrangements will be made for compliance with manufacturer's recommendations by shipping equipment elsewhere for periodic testing and calibration-provided that adequate backup exists for equipment temporarily out of service for this purpose. 2.2.1.2 Instruments and equipment which would be used during an actual nuclear power plant emergency will be tested during drills and exercises. Any equipment found to be malfunctioning should be calibrated, repaired or replaced. 2.2.2 Equipment Used Only During Nuclear Emergencies 2.2.2.1 In addition to the criteria above, equipment used only during emergencies should be inspected and inventoried quarterly and after each use (trainings, drills and exercises). 2.2.2.2 All battery-operated equipment or instruments should not be stored with the batteries installed, unless checked, and the batteries should be tested, inventoried, and if necessary, charged or replaced on a regular basis. 2.2.2.3 Manufacturer information regarding radio interference not affecting Personal Electronic Dosimeters is available from County OES. 2.3 Equipment Inventory The County Office of Emergency Services will ensure the inventory of applicable equipment and instruments which are to be used specifically for implementation of this Plan, and are not used for regular non-emergency purposes. 68 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 6, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 This inventory will include the following categories: 2.3.1 Protective equipment 2.3.2 Communications equipment 2.3.3 Radiological monitoring equipment 2.3.4 Emergency supplies This inventory will be reviewed annually and maintained in County Office of Emergency Services files. Each organization to which equipment is assigned is responsible for assisting the County Office of Emergency Services in collecting the required inventory information. San Luis Obispo County OES will review any map products related to the NPP Emergency Preparedness Program annual and update as necessary. 3. RESOURCE AGREEMENTS The County of San Luis Obispo is the Operational Area Coordinator for resources and support during an accident at Diablo Canyon Power Plant and will coordinate with the State Mutual Aid Region I. The Mutual Aid Region will function under the direction of the Cal OES Regional Emergency Operations Center (REOC) Director and will be responsible for coordinating appropriate resources and/or support activities. The Cal OES Secretary, or a designated representative, will have overall responsibility for coordinating state, federal and private resources in support of Mutual Aid Regions. Volunteer and private agencies are also part of the Mutual Aid System. The American Red Cross is an essential element of San Luis Obispo County’s response to meet the care and shelter needs of evacuees. 4. OTHER RESOURCES The county of San Luis Obispo has an Emergency Operations Plan that addresses policies and procedures for providing or coordinating the provision of services, equipment and supplies to support emergency operations. It describes the governmental organizations responsible for providing resources to support emergency response and recovery. The procurement of supplies, personnel, transportation, etc. may be subject to special to special orders and regulations promulgated by the Governor during a State of Emergency. 69 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SECTION 7 - PROGRAM MAINTENANCE 1. PLAN AND PROCEDURE MAINTENANCE 1.1 Overview The County Administrator, using staff assigned to the County Office of Emergency Services, is responsible for the annual review and necessary preparation and distribution of any updated version of this Plan and procedures. All plan call lists should be reviewed quarterly and updated as necessary. Every responding department, agency, and jurisdiction is responsible for developing and maintaining current internal call lists and procedures for prompt alerting and mobilizing those personnel responding to the emergency upon notification. The County Office of Emergency Services will ensure that current updates of the Emergency Notification list are distributed to appropriate notifying agencies at least quarterly, as required. Revisions of the Plan will be distributed in accordance with the distribution list. 1.2 Responsibility The County Administrator is responsible for plan maintenance; the tasks which may be performed by a designated Emergency Services Coordinator in the County Office of Emergency Services are as follows: 1.2.1 This plan will be reviewed annually and updated as needed. The update will incorporate improvements derived from drills, exercises and real events. 1.2.2 Updated or revisions to the Plan are to be distributed per the distribution list. 1.2.3 Recipients of controlled copies will be provided with copies of all revisions. 1.2.4 County and other agencies assigned emergency responsibilities under this Plan will develop and keep current detailed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Agencies will review their SOP’s annually. If there are any revisions to agencies’ SOPs, County Office of Emergency Services will update and distribute the revised SOP according to the distribution list. 1.2.5 The county will conduct training exercises and drills in conjunction with Cal OES and DCPP/PG&E. 70 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 1.2.5.1 The Plan and any approved changes will be forwarded to all organizations and individuals with responsibilities for implementation. Revised pages will be dated and marked to show where changes have been made. 2. EMERGENCY RESOURCE MAINTENANCE 2.1 Overview The majority of the resources needed to support this Plan are used (therefore tested) in daily operations by a variety of agencies and jurisdictions. Failures in daily use are handled in the normal course of business by the affected entity. Detailed information on specific hardware can be found in applicable Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) - see Part Three of the Plan. 2.2 Specific Resource Maintenance Items 2.2.1 Emergency Operations Center (EOC) The County Office of Emergency Services (OES) conducts monthly inspections, inventories, and tests of EOC systems that may not be used on a daily basis. This includes, but is not limited to tests of telephones, computers, printers, fax equipment, radios, dedicated RED phone, Brown phone system, DCPP Operations Radio Net, Tone Alert Monitors, photocopier, EOC/EOF public address system, televisions and a walk down check of interior EOC sprinkler fire extinguisher valves, lights, exterior lighting and drainage system. PG&E is responsible for maintenance and testing of the EOC physical plant, including the standby generator and uninterrupted power supply (UPS). 2.2.2 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) The County Office of Emergency Services (OES) serves as the custodian and central control point for SOPs that are Part Three of this Plan. See Part Three, Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Numerical Listing. SOPs for County Departments are reviewed / revised annually on a rotating schedule. Page changes are made on an interim basis as determined necessary by OES. All SOP holders are queried quarterly for critical changes such as names, phone numbers, and other communications links. 71 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Distribution of SOP controlled or confidential copies to SOP holders and the EOC is handled by County OES. OES removes the proprietary information in controlled copies and provides sanitized copies or copies with confidential information removed for public access. OES also distributes sanitized copies of each SOP to applicable State and Federal agencies. 2.2.3 Tone Alert Monitors The Tone Alert Monitors distributed to schools, hospitals, and other locations are tested monthly during the EOC tests. Schools verify their receipt of the monthly test and verification postcards are distributed to all tone alert monitor holders twice a year. 2.24 Emergency Worker Exposure Control (EWEC) Kits Change-out of kit contents is coordinated by County OES. Kit contents are covered in detail in the SOP HP-11. EWEC kits are inventoried quarterly under guidance from County OES. 2.2.5 Field Monitoring Team (FMT) Equipment FMT kits are inventoried and inspected quarterly in accordance with the SOP, HP-3. DCPP provides instruments and equipment and is responsible for their maintenance and calibration. 2.2.6 Computers All computers that are used in emergency response activities are tested on a regular basis as part of the monthly EOC checks (see 2.2.1 above). 2.2.7 Radios and Emergency Alert System (EAS) The County Communications Shop (County Comm) conducts regular testing of applicable radio systems and the Emergency Alert System. 2.2.8 Radiological Monitoring Equipment Instruments other than those used by the FMTs are provided by California OES, are calibrated on an annual basis and are stamped with a current service stamp. The Ludlums are operationally checked quarterly. Portal monitors are maintained by DCPP. 2.2.9 Early Warning Sirens 72 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 DCPP/PG&E is responsible for the installation, testing maintenance and upgrade of the EWS system. The first sirens were provided for the County by PG&E on 12/20/1982. As of March 2006, all 131 sirens in the EPZ have been replaced and upgraded to have battery back-up power. PG&E is responsible for acoustical testing, as necessary. PG&E owns the operating system, radio mountain top repeaters, poles, provides electrical power to sirens and maintains the operability of the battery back-up system. San Luis Obispo County (SLC) authorizes the use of the sirens. SLC OES incorporates siren information in SOPs, coordinates public information regarding general or basic siren information, public notices and information about quarterly growl testing for individual sirens and the annual full sound test for all sirens simultaneously. Both DCPP and SLC OES provide results of the annual siren testing. 2.3 Joint Information Center (JIC) DCPP/PG&E has a facility on Kansas Avenue near the EOC and is responsible for maintaining the facility, all maps, displays, status boards, and provides security at the JIC during drills, exercises and actual events. San Luis Obispo County OES maintains a common office space for PIO staff and various agency/department PIOs in the facility’s PIO room. The Phone Assistance Center (PAC) is located adjacent to this common office. The telephones used by the PAC personnel are maintained by DCPP/PG&E and County OES. A laptop, projector, screen, tables and chairs are in the common briefing room and are maintained by DCPP/PG&E. All county-maintained equipment is checked monthly. 3. TRAINING 3.1 Overview 3.1.1 Scope The training program is applicable to the county Plan only and is limited to providing for response to offsite emergency actions. (In cooperation with County OES, DCPP Fire provides on-site emergency response training for offsite fire agencies.) Training includes key concepts and principals of the Incident Command System (ICS), Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) and National Incident Management System (NIMS) applicable at all jurisdictional levels and 73 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 across functional disciplines. County OES has the responsibility of coordinating and sometimes providing the training for the various agencies. 3.1.2 Frequency Except where noted differently, training should be provided on an annual basis. It is recommended that participation in training, be done on a rotating basis to continually expand the group of people who are trained. Refresher training or retraining will be provided as determined by the County OES. 3.1.3 Training Needs and Audience Table 7.3-1 indicates the training needs for applicable audiences. Details of the topic content for each training need is listed in item 3.2 below. See individual SOP to determine appropriate training for emergency workers implementing that procedure. 3.1.4 Training Coordination Responsibilities Table 7.3-1 indicates the organization responsible for coordinating the required training for each agency having a role in the county Plan. 3.1.5 Training Record Summary The County Office of Emergency Services will be responsible for ensuring the required training is provided and will maintain records of training courses and attendees. A summary of training conducted is sent to Cal OES. 3.2 Training Needs Detailed This section provides detail on the scope of each of the training needs identified in Table 7.3-1 and specifies the coordinating agency. Table 7.3-1 also provides a summary of audiences and coordination responsibilities. 3.2.1 County Command Classroom training on aspects of emergency management will be provided to the County Command Group. Topics addressed in this training include: 3.2.1.1 Meteorology 3.2.1.2 Protective action recommendations 3.2.1.3 UDAC operations 3.2.1.4 County, state, federal, and utility roles 74 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 3.2.1.5 County Command coordination 3.2.1.6 Incident Command System (ICS) 3.2.1.7 Standardized Emergency Management Systems (SEMS) 3.2.1.8 National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) 3.2.2 Emergency Plan Overview A briefing of the county Plan shall be given to organizations indicated on Table 7.3-1. The topics covered in the briefing include: 3.2.2.1 Emergency plan elements 3.2.2.2 Response organization responsibilities 3.2.2.3 Emergency classification system 3.2.2.4 Planning zones 3.2.2.5 Coordination concepts 3.2.2.6 Concept of operations 3.2.2.7 Incident Command System (ICS) 3.2.2.8 Standardized Emergency Management Systems (SEMS) 3.2.2.9 National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) 3.2.3 Radiation and Biological Effects Organizations with responsibility for conducting field operations in the plume exposure emergency planning zone, as indicated on Table 7.3-1, will be given classroom training covering the basic aspects of radiation and associated biological effects. Topics addressed in this training include: 3.2.3.1 Ionizing radiation 3.2.3.2 Types of radiation 3.2.3.3 Radiation terminology and units of measure 3.2.3.4 Dose vs. dose rate 3.2.3.5 Acute vs. chronic exposure 3.2.3.6 Risks associated with radiation exposure 3.2.3.7 Background radiation 3.2.4 Introduction to Nuclear Power Classroom training is available to organizations expressing an interest in the basic concepts of nuclear power. Topics addressed in this training may include: 3.2.4.1 Fission process 3.2.4.2 Basic components of a nuclear power plant 3.2.4.3 Steam generation and electrical production 3.2.4.4 Cooling and heat removal 75 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 3.2.4.5 Multiple barrier concept 3.2.4.6 Emergency Planning and Response 3.2.5 Exposure Control for Emergency Workers Organizations with responsibility for conducting operations in the plume exposure emergency planning zone, as indicated on Table 7.3-1, will be provided instruction on exposure control. This classroom training will include hands-on training of the exposure control equipment used by emergency workers. Topics covered in this training include: 3.2.5.1 ALARA concepts 3.2.5.2 Dosimetry use 3.2.5.3 Exposure tracking techniques 3.2.5.4 Potassium iodide 3.2.5.5 Protective action guidelines and exposure limits 3.2.5.6 Emergency equipment storage locations 3.2.6 Standard Operating Procedures Organizations with responsibility for implementing standard operating procedures, as indicated on Table 7.3-1, will be provided classroom training specific to their role in emergency response. A numerical listing of the Standard Operating Procedures detailed in Part 3 of the Plan is listed in Table 7.3-2. Topics covered in this training include but are not limited to: 3.2.6.1 Purpose and scope 3.2.6.2 Communications and notifications 3.2.6.3 Emergency organization and responsibilities 3.2.6.4 Initiating conditions 3.2.6.5 Emergency actions 3.2.6.6 Documenting information and actions 3.2.6.7 Demobilization and recovery Tabletops and drills will be conducted as deemed appropriate by the County OES. 3.2.7 Accident Assessment Classroom instruction and working problem sessions shall be given to key individuals designated to perform dose calculations and analysis in UDAC. (See Table 7.3-1). The training shall include: 3.2.7.1 Conversion of monitored data to dose projections 76 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 3.2.7.2 Estimating exposure from source term 3.2.7.3 Dispersion of radioactive material in the atmosphere 3.2.7.4 Recommending protective actions based upon dose projections This course will be coordinated by County OES and DCPP. Participants, in addition to OES and DCPP, may include individuals from County Environmental Health, Agricultural Commissioner, Air Pollution and Control District, CDPH, Cal OES. DCPP will provide training on the Emergency Assessment and Response System (EARS) which has been installed at the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF). The County OES will monitor course content and specify supplemental training as required. Drills will be conducted in conjunction with health physics drills sponsored by DCPP. FEMA also offers an accident assessment course which fulfills the classroom portion of this training requirement. 3.2.8 Fielding Monitoring A briefing and field drills will be provided to those designated in Table 7.3-1 on the use of monitoring equipment for detection of a radioactive plume. The field drill shall include the use of radio and satellite phone communications to report readings to the Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC). Training drills will be provided by DCPP. Training shall also be provided in conjunction with the annual exercise or health physics drills. 3.2.9 Medical Response This training is applicable to health care professionals handling serious accidents involving radioactive contamination, which could occur due to an accident onsite. Federal guidance requires designation of a primary and back-up hospital capable of handling a limited number of patients who would most likely be both injured and contaminated. As indicated in Table 7.3-1, this training is required for the County Health Officer and recommended for other physicians who may be presented with this type of case. The Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/ Training Site (REAC/TS) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, currently offers a 3 ½-day course for medical personnel (including emergency room physicians, nurses, medical technicians, supervisors, and paramedics) which fulfills this training need. . 3.2.9.1 Radiation Fundamentals for Medical Staff Local medical professionals with knowledge of radiation exposure and the medical effects are needed to treat persons not hospitalized but who may have been exposed to 77 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 or contaminated by small amounts of radiation. The County Health Officer and CDPH will identify course candidates and will promote attendance at courses to be developed under their joint guidance. Public Health Nurses also receive annual training in methods for decontaminating non-injured evacuees and emergency workers. 3.2.10 Operations of Reception, Monitoring and Decontamination and Congregate Care Facilities Both the County Emergency Operations Plan and the Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan call for training of the County Health Agency, American Red Cross and Department of Social Services employees who may be involved in the operation of congregate care facilities. Training content includes: 3.2.11.1 Concept of operations 3.2.11.2 Registration 3.2.11.3 Providing care 3.2.11.4 Resources and record keeping 3.2.11.5 Handling welfare inquiries and distributing information 3.2.11.6 Basic radiation fundamentals 3.2.11.7 Incident Command System (ICS) 3.2.11.8 Standardized Emergency Management Systems (SEMS) 3.2.11.9 National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) Training will be provided by the American Red Cross, County OES and DCPP; County OES will ensure participation by appropriate agencies. 3.2.11 Those involved with the Phone Assistance Center operation. Applicable training includes: 3.2.12.1 Use of rumor-control telephones 3.2.12.2 Handling of Evacuation Assistance calls 3.2.12.3 Concept of operation 3.2.12.4 Handling transportation requests 3.2.12.5 Handling shelter inquiries 3.2.12.6 Rumor-control information 3.2.12.7 Standardized Emergency Management Systems (SEMS) 3.2.12.8 National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) 3.3 Training of Mutual Aid Forces 3.3.1 Law Enforcement 78 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 The training provisions include training for the County Sheriff's Department forces, as well as the incorporated cities within the Emergency Planning Zone, which are within the mutual aid district for law enforcement. Such training is applicable to the response outside the DCPP/PG&E property. 3.3.2 Fire Service The training provisions include training for the offsite fire services within the Emergency Planning Zone. The training detailed in this section is applicable to response assignments outside the DCPP/PG&E property. 3.3.3 Ambulance/Rescue Paramedics, including ambulance service personnel are trained in accordance with State Law and their Scope of Practice. In addition, they receive training from DCPP regarding response to the site involving the transport of a contaminated, injured person. 3.4 Training of Personnel Responsible For Transmittal of Emergency Information and Instructions 3.4.1 County Public Information Officers (PIOs) and assistants are included in the training program with regard to Plan content, departmental duties, and specific procedures. 3.4.2 In addition, participation in drills and the full-scale emergency preparedness exercise will serve as training for these designated individual. 3.5 Media Briefing/Training An annual media briefing/training will be conducted in coordination with DCPP. In lieu of attendance, information will be provided regarding nuclear power plant emergency preparedness. 4. EXERCISES AND DRILLS 4.1 Overview 4.1.1 NUREG – Specified Scope Exercises and drills will be conducted by appropriate county agencies in accordance with the standards and criteria of NUREG 0654/FEMAREP-1, Planning Standard N. Exercises will be conducted according to the eight year exercise cycle. 79 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 4.1.2 Added Scope Consistent with the expanded drill sequence initiated by state and federal agencies in 1981, and the 1980, 1985 and 1993 revised Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that establishes policy and terms for mutual cooperation in evaluating emergency preparedness in support of nuclear power plants; the following drills are to be accomplished: 4.1.2.1 Interagency Coordination Exercise (Dress Rehearsal/Training Exercise): To develop a working interface capability between the County EOC, UDAC, DCPP/PG&E, EOF, and Joint Information Center PIOs, Cities, various Department Operations Centers (DOCs) and agencies. 4.1.2.2 Health Physics and Radiation Monitoring Drills: To practice making dose projections and protective action recommendations for UDAC personnel and measuring radiation levels for field monitoring teams. 4.1.2.3 Public Information Drill: To test the effectiveness of communications systems and message handling. 4.1.2.4 Reception and Congregate Care Facilities Drill: To develop and promote a working relationship with others (Red Cross, National Guard, etc.) involved in operating congregate care facilities. (tabletop or walkthrough may be held in conjunction with bi-annual exercise.) 4.1.2.5 School Drill: To permit school officials to practice using their standard operating procedures. 4.2 Implementation of Exercises and Drills Implementing objectives, instructions, procedures, schedules, lists of participants, scenarios, response functions to be exercised or drilled, arrangements for official observers and detailed evaluation criteria are to be developed by the County Office of Emergency Services. The implementation of the exercises and drills are in accordance with the extent of play developed and coordinated with Diablo Canyon Power Plant Emergency Planning and the California Office of Emergency Services prior to each exercise with acknowledgement from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), California Department of Public Health (CDPH) FEMA and approval from FEMA. 80 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 The Radiological Emergency Preparedness REP Program Manual is used as the guidance for preparing and administering the exercise and drill program. Self (player/participant) critiques and controller critiques are conducted immediately after each drill or exercise and a formal evaluation report is generated using the guidance provided in the Radiological Emergency Preparedness Exercise Evaluation Methodology. Full scale exercises of this plan and its procedures are conducted in accordance with the time frame stated in federal requirements and the 8 year exercise schedule. The County Administrator will be responsible for ensuring that all drills and exercises described in NUREG 0654/FEMA-REP-1 are scheduled and carried out by participating agencies as appropriate and will establish the necessary procedures and assign responsibility for ensuring that the results of all exercises and drills are incorporated into the plan documents prior to the next scheduled exercise or drill. The County OES will send a record of training and drills conducted annually to Cal OES. Pursuant to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, periodic exercises will be conducted to evaluate major portions of emergency response capabilities, periodic drills will be conducted to develop and maintain key skills, and deficiencies identified as a result of exercises or drills will be corrected. These exercises and drills are as follows: 4.2.1 Full scale emergency preparedness exercise 4.2.2 Communication drills 4.2.3 Medical emergency drills 4.2.4 Radiological monitoring drills 4.2.5 Health physics drills 5. PUBLIC EDUCATION 5.1 Scope This Plan, the State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan, and the Diablo Canyon Power Plant Emergency Plan provide for government and other identified organizations to perform coordinated action in the event of an emergency at Diablo Canyon Power Plant. To properly implement the Plan, the public must be informed of emergency preparedness activities. This is accomplished through a Public Education program which includes, but is not limited to, the following: 81 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 5.1.1 Annual distribution of Important Emergency Information within the Emergency Planning Zone (PAZs 1-12) and the 3 Public Education Zones (PEZs) adjacent to the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). This annually updated Emergency Information can be in the form of a calendar or a booklet that can be inserted in the recipient’s telephone book and it can include but not limited to the following information: 5.1.1.1 Instructions for public response to an emergency at Diablo Canyon Power Plant including public school relocation center locations, monitoring, decontamination and reception center and congregate care center locations, important information regarding the Emergency Warning System Sirens and the Emergency Alert System messages (heard on all local radio and television stations) and information regarding ingesting Potassium Iodine. 5.1.1.2 General background information about nuclear power generation, radiation, and the Emergency Response Plan for Diablo Canyon Power Plant. 5.1.1.3 Forms for registering members of the public who need special assistance and/or transportation in an emergency. 5.1.2 Annual publication in the local YP telephone book. Calendar or booklet will contain nuclear emergency information pertaining to both the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) and the Public Education Zones (PEZ). The annually reviewed and updated information will provide information relating to the sounding of the Early Warning System Sirens; instructions to tune to a local radio or television station to receive the Emergency Alert System messages; emergency telephone number for inquiries and/or assistance, collection point locations, public school relocation centers, public monitoring, decontamination and reception center and congregate care center locations, pet information, service animal information; monitoring and decontamination centers; information regarding potassium iodine (KI) and a map showing the EPZ (with PAZ descriptions) and PEZs in San Luis Obispo County; Website information, Facebook and Twitter. 5.1.3 Preparation and distribution of siren information stickers for use in hotel and motel rooms, lobbies, and places of public assembly. The stickers remind the public to listen to local radio or television stations for emergency information if a steady siren of three to five minutes should sound. 5.1.4 Promote public awareness of the Emergency Response Plan for Diablo Canyon Power Plant in conjunction with field exercises. Promotion can be accomplished through news releases in cooperation with PG&E, the 82 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 American Red Cross, Cal OES, or other emergency response organizations. 5.1.5 Annual postcard distribution, by DCPP, within the EPZ and PEZs informing residents of annual siren test. Information includes the areas where the sirens will be heard, instructions on what to do if sirens are heard at times other than test days, a request that the public not call 9-1-1 for information about the test, and where to find additional emergency information. 5.1.6 Postcard distribution, by DCPP, for those residents and businesses within the northern Santa Barbara County. The postcard provides information as to where to find emergency information about DCPP and how Santa Barbara County is prepared to assist in the event of an emergency at Diablo Canyon Power Plant. 5.1.7 An Agricultural booklet is produced by CDPH detailing specific information for ranchers, farmers, producers, processors, distributors, etc. regarding specific agriculture issues. Limited Agriculture information is also included in the annual public information. 5.1.8 Although San Luis Obispo County Emergency Planning Zone does not meet the requirement to produce non-English language materials, Spanish information is available. 5.2 Content The following shall be the minimum content addressed in the annual distribution of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant Emergency Response Information: 5.2.1 Emergency Instructions 5.2.1.1 The meaning of the siren (go indoors and stay tuned to a local radio or television station). 5.2.1.2 Other means of notification of the general public. 5.2.1.3 Protective actions emphasizing shelter or evacuation. 5.2.1.4 Description of emergency classification levels. 5.2.1.5 Sheltering -- what steps the public should take. 5.2.1.6 Evacuation -- what steps the public should take and the location of the reception and congregate care centers. 83 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 5.2.1.7 Identification of protective action zones. 5.2.1.8 Main evacuation routes to monitoring, decontamination and reception center and congregate care center locations. 5.2.1.9 Identification of principle arteries to evacuation routes. 5.2.1.10 Identification of telephone numbers for urgently needed information and/or transportation assistance during evacuation. 5.2.1.11 Information regarding Potassium Iodide (KI) for instance, where to purchase and when KI should be taken and by whom. 5.2.1.12 Use telephones for personal emergencies only. 5.2.1.13 How public schools will be relocated, including information on planned public school relocation centers. 5.2.1.14 Notifications for those at sea. 5.2.1.15 Special provisions for individuals with access and functional needs. 5.2.2 General Information The following key points will be provided: 5.2.2.1 Nuclear Power 5.2.2.1.1 Description of potential hazards. 5.2.2.2 Radiation 5.2.2.2.1. Description. 5.2.2.2.2 Health effects. 5.2.2.2.3 Potassium Iodide (KI) 5.2.2.3 Response Plan 5.2.2.3.1 How plan is activated. 84 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 5.2.2.3.2 What preparations are in place according to the Plan. 5.2.2.3.3 What the public can do to assist. 5.2.3 Questions Expected (Example Listing) 5.2.3.1 How will I be notified? 5.2.3.2 Who will decide what to do? 5.2.3.3 What about visitors? 5.2.3.4 When should I take Potassium Iodide (KI)? 5.2.3.5 What can I do to help or be prepared? 5.2.4 Emergency Checklist 5.2.4.1 Shelter 5.2.4.1.1 Securing building or room area. 5.2.4.1.2 Stay tuned to local radio or television station. 5.2.4.1.3 Additional provisions such as emergency supply of water, food, medications and a means of communication.. 5.2.4.2 Evacuation 5.2.4.2.1 What to take (list). 5.2.4.2.2 Where to go. 5.2.4.2.3 Protective Action Zone _ instructed to evacuate. has been 5.2.4.2.4 Ride with friends or offer transportation. 5.2.4.2.5 No transportation; walk to collection point. 5.2.4.2.6 Plan to stay with friends or relatives if possible. 85 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 5.2.4.2.7 Securing the residence. 5.2.5 Preparedness 5.2.5.1 Family plan (meeting places, vehicles, pets, relative/friend to stay with, etc.). 5.2.5.2 Provisions (emergency kit). 5.2.5.3 Registration for those with disability or medical need. 5.2.6 Agricultural Information 86 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 PART 2 – ATTACHMENTS, FIGURES AND TABLES LIST ATTACHMENT 1.1: GLOSSARY ATTACHMENT 1.2: ACRONYMS ATTACHMENT 2: NUREG CROSSWALK FIGURE 2.1: REGIONAL LOCATION MAP FIGURE 3.1.1: NRC-DEFINED EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONES (EPZ) FIGURE 3.1.2: NRC-DEFINED PROTECTIVE ACTION ZONE AND INGESTION PATHWAY ZONE (IPZ) FIGURE 3.2: STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEFINEDEMERGENCY PLANNING ZONE and PUBLIC EDUCATION ZONE FIGURE 3.3: INGESTION PATHWAY ZONE MAP FIGURE 3.4: WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION FIGURE 3.5: MAJOR EVACUATION ROUTES FIGURE 3.6: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES FIGURE 3.7: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES FOR RECEPTION AND CONGREGATE CARE CENTERS FIGURE 3.8: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES PUBLIC SCHOOL RELOCATION CENTERS FIGURE 3.9: GRAPHICAL DEPICTION OF KEY EVACUATION FIGURE 4.1.1: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION FIGURE 4.1.2: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – OPERATIONS SECTION FIGURE 4.1.3: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – PLANS SECTION FIGURE 4.1.4: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – LOGISTICS SECTION FIGURE 4.1.5: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION SECTION 87 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 FIGURE 4.2: INTERAGENCY EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION FIGURE 5.2: EVACUATION ROUTE FROM DIABLO CANYON POWER PLANT TABLE 2.1: RELATIONSHIP OF WHOLE BODY DOSE TO HEALTH EFFECTS TABLE 2.2: RADIATION EXPOSURE CRITERIA TABLE 3.1: EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONE DESCRIPTIONS PROTECTIVE ACTION ZONES (PAZ) TABLE 3.2.1: EPZ PERMANENT RESIDENT POPULATION TABLE 3.2.2: PERMANENT RESIDENT VEHCILES BY PAZ TABLE 3.3.1: SUMMARY OF POPULATION DEMAND TABLE 3.3.2: SUMMARY OF VEHICLE DEMAND TABLE 3.4: RECOMMENDED PROTECTIVE ACTIONS TABLE 3.5.1: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 90 PERCENT OF POPULATION TABLE 3.5.2: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 100 PERCENT OF POPULATION TABLE 3.6: EVACUATION TIMES STUDY EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE TABLE 3.7: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS AT THE FOUR EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVELS TABLE 3.7: GUIDANCE ON INITIATION AND DURATION OF RELEASE TABLE 7.3-1: TRAINING MATRIX TABLE 7.3-2: SOP NUMERICAL LISTINGS TABLE 7.3-3: BLOCK DIAGRAM CROSS REFERENCE 88 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 ATTACHMENT 1.1: GLOSSARY24 ACCIDENT: An uncontrolled event which has the potential for creating an emergency condition. AGRICULTURAL HOLD AREAS: Predetermined areas within the 50 mile Ingestion Pathway Zone. The purpose of the Agricultural Hold Area is to prevent the movement of potentially contaminated food, fodder or water until sampled and certified as being safe for marketing. AIR SAMPLING: The collection and analysis of samples of air to measure its radioactivity or to detect the presence of radioactive substances, particulate matter or chemical pollutants. ALERT: Events are in process or have occurred that involve actual or potential substantial degradation of the level of safety of the plant or a security event that involves probable life threatening risk to site personnel or damage to site equipment because of hostile action. Any releases expected to be limited to small fractions of the EPA Protective Action Guideline exposure levels. ASSESSMENT ACTIONS: Those actions taken during or after an accident to obtain and process information necessary for decisions implementing specific emergency measures. BACKGROUND RADIATION: Radiation arising from material other than the one directly under consideration. Cosmic rays and natural radioactivity are always present, and man-made sources may also contribute to the background radiation levels. COMMAND GROUP: Those in charge of the County Emergency Organization; including the Emergency Services Director as the lead individual and three other members, the County Sheriff, County Fire Chief, and County Health Officer. COMMITTED DOSE EQUIVALENT (CDE): Refers to the radiation dose that will be received over a period of 50 years from the ingestion or inhalation of a particular quantity of a radionuclide or a specific mix of radionuclides. COMMITTED EFFECTIVE DOSE EQUIVALENT(CEDE): Refers to the radiation dose that will be received over a period of 50 years from the inhalation (or ingestion) of radionuclides, where the individual organ doses have been adjusted so that the associated risk of fatal cancer can be added to the risk of fatal cancer from whole-body dose. CONGREGATE CARE CENTER: Refers to a facility for temporary housing, care and feeding of evacuees. Can also be referred to as a Shelter. 24 REV. 50.; MAY 2006 89 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 CONTAMINATION: The deposition of unwanted radioactive material on the surfaces of structures, areas, objects, or personnel. CORRECTIVE ACTIONS: Those emergency measures taken to ameliorate or terminate an emergency situation at or near the source of the problem in order to prevent an uncontrolled release of radioactive material or to reduce the magnitude of a release, e.g., shutting down equipment, firefighting, repair and damage control. Corrective actions are taken by the power plant operators. DECAY: Disintegration of the nucleus of a radionuclide in a radioactive process. DECAY RATE: The decrease in the activity of a radioactive material within a given time. The decay rate is usually expressed in terms of the period during which half of the atoms will disintegrate, i.e., the half-life. DECONTAMINATION: The reduction or removal on contamination (unwanted radioactive material) from a structure, area, object or person. Decontamination may be accomplished by (1) treating the surface to remove or decrease the contamination; (2) letting the material stand so that the radioactivity is decreased as a result of natural decay; and (3) covering the contamination to shield or attenuate the radiation emitted. DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS CENTER (DOC): Location where operational coordination is accomplished for a specific department or function. May also function as a branch of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). DOSE: A general form denoting the quantity of radiation or energy absorbed. For special purposes it must be appropriately qualified. If unqualified, it refers to the absorbed dose. DOSE CORRECTION FACTOR: Any factor that is used to change an environmental measurement to dose. DOSE LIMITS FOR EMERGENCY WORKERS: Refers to the allowable accumulated dose during the entire period of the emergency. Action to avoid exceeding the limit is taken based on actual measurements of integrated gamma exposure. In contrast, protection action guides are trigger levels of projected dose at which actions are taken to protect the public. These actions are taken prior to the dose being received. DOSE RATE: The amount of radiation to which an individual would be exposed per unit of time. DOSIMETER: An instrument for measuring and registering total accumulated exposure to penetrating ionizing radiations EFFECTIVE DOSE EQUIVALENT (EDE): The sum of the products of the dose equivalent to each organ and a weighting factor, where the weighting factor is the ratio of the risk of mortality from delayed health effects arising from irradiation of a particular organ or tissue to the 90 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 total risk of mortality from delayed health effects when the whole body irradiated uniformly to the same dose. EMERGENCY ACTION LEVEL (EAL): Specific contamination levels of airborne, waterborne, or surface deposited concentrations of radioactive materials; or specific instrument indications (including their rates of change) that may be used as threshold for initiating such specific emergency measures as designating a particular class of emergency, initiating a notification procedure, or initiating a particular protective action. EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS): Replaces the Emergency Broadcasting System (EBS). Method of advising public of protective measures via broadcast and cable media. EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVEL (ECL): The four levels of nuclear power plant emergencies established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Federal Emergency Management Agency: Notification of Unusual Event, Alert, Site Area Emergency, and General Emergency. EMERGENCY MEASURES: A collective term encompassing the assessment, corrective, and protective actions taken during the course of the emergency condition. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC): Offsite locations from which control and/or coordination of offsite emergency actions are affected. The center is staffed by key County emergency personnel charged with overall coordination and implementation of offsite emergency operations and protective actions for the public. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS FACILITY (EOF): This is the location from which DCPP/PG&E personnel evaluate and coordinate activities in response to an accident at DCPP. The EOF is co-located with the EOC and is approximately 12 miles from DCPP. PG&E provides information on accident conditions at DCPP to Federal, State and local authorities for implementation of offsite emergency plans. Office space is also provided for the NRC, FEMA, State OES and staff of the UDAC. EMERGENCY PHASE: Refers to the initial phase of response actions, during which actions are taken in response to a threat of release or a release in progress. EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONE (EPZ): The Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP) is completely within San Luis Obispo County. The State of California has divided an area around the Diablo Canyon Power Plant into 12 Protective Action Zones (PAZs). These 12 PAZs form the Emergency Planning Zone for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. PAZs 1 through 5 form an area whose boundary is approximately 10 miles from the DCPP facility. PAZs 1 through 5 comprise the area where the federal government has primary oversight responsibility for plans and preparedness. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (FEMA) is the organization responsible for offsite emergency preparedness within the area defined as PAZs 1 through 5. PAZs 6 through 12 extend beyond the approximate 10 mile limit and comprise the area where the State of California has primary responsibility for plans and preparedness. The planning and preparedness for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant incorporates a single concept of operations for 91 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 the entire emergency planning zone. FEMA evaluates the portions of the plans and preparedness activities associated with the area and population within PAZ 1 through 5. The Governor’s Office of Emergency Services reviews the portions of the plans and preparedness activities associated with the area and population within PAZ 6 through 12. The Emergency Planning Zone is the area where protective actions may be required. The range of protective actions includes sheltering in place and evacuation. EMERGENCY SERVICES COORDINATOR (ESC): A member of the Command Group of the County Emergency Organization acting under the direction of the Emergency Services Director. EMERGENCY SERVICES DIRECTOR (ESD): A member of the Command Group who is in charge of the County Emergency Organization. The County Administrative Officer is assigned this title, however, four alternates are also named. The term Emergency Services Director, as used in this Plan, refers to the County ESD unless otherwise noted. EVACUATION: The process of moving people from a potentially hazardous area to a safe area. EXPOSURE: A measure of the ionization produced in air by X or gamma radiation. The Roentgen (R) is the unit of exposure. The term “dose” is sometimes used interchangeably with exposure and refers to absorbed ionization of energy in air. FIELD MONITORING TEAM (FMT): A group of individuals trained in the use of field radiation detection instruments who conduct field surveys and samplings. GENERAL EMERGENCY (GE): Events that are in process or have occurred which involve actual or imminent substantial core degradation or melting with potential for loss of containment integrity or hostile action that results in an actual loss of physical control of the facility. Releases can be reasonably expected to exceed EPA Protective Action Guideline exposure levels offsite for more than the immediate site area. IMPLEMENTING INSTRUCTIONS: Step by step instructions which implement the provisions of the Emergency Response Plan. INGESTION PATHWAY: A route by which released radioactive material is introduced into the environment, including food chain and/or water supply, and is subsequently ingested by members of the population. INSTITUTIONALIZED INDIVIDUALS: Are individuals who reside in institutions, such as nursing homes or prisons, and may need to depend on others for assistance with protective actions. Institutionalized individuals may or may not have special needs or functional diversity LOW POPULATION ZONE (PAZ 1 AND 2): The area immediately surrounding the exclusion area of the power plant which contains residents, the total number and density of which are such that there is reasonable probability that appropriate protective measures could be taken in their behalf in the event of a serious accident (10 CFR 100.3). For Diablo Canyon 92 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 Power Plant this is an area encompassed by a radius of approximately 6 statute miles (10KM). This area corresponds to Protective Action Zones 1 and 2. NOTIFICATION OF UNUSUAL EVENT (UE): Events are in process or have occurred which indicate a potential degradation of the level of safety of the plant or indicate a security threat to facility protection has been initiated. No releases of radioactive material requiring offsite response or monitoring are expected unless further degradation of safety systems occurs. OFFSITE: Any area outside of the PG&E owned Diablo Canyon Power Plant property line. ONSITE: The area within the property upon which the Diablo Canyon Power Plant is located, and over which the Pacific Gas and Electric Company exercises access control. This area is approximately 900 acres immediately surrounding the plant. PLUME EXPOSURE PATHWAY: The means by which the radioactive material released from the facility (plume) may expose the population at risk to radiation. This exposure may be external exposure from the passing plume, from contaminated surfaces, or may be from inhalation of the passing plume. PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR (PWR): A power reactor in which heat is transferred from the core to a heat exchanger by water kept under high pressure to achieve high temperature without boiling in the primary system. Steam is generated in a secondary system. Diablo Canyon is the type of reactor. PROJECTED DOSE: An estimate of the radiation dose which affected individuals could potentially receive if protective actions are not taken. PROTECTIVE ACTION GUIDE (PAG): Projected radiological dose or dose commitment values to individuals in the general population that warrant protective action following a release of radioactive material. Protective actions would be warranted provided the reduction in individual dose expected to be achieved by carrying out the protective action is not offset by excessive risks to individual safety in taking the protective action. The PAG does not include the dose that has unavoidably occurred prior to the assessment. PROTECTIVE ACTIONS: Those emergency measures taken after an uncontrolled release of radioactive material has occurred for the purpose of preventing or minimizing radiological exposures to persons that would be likely to occur if the actions were not taken. PUBLIC EDUCATION ZONE (PEZ): The State of California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan area enclosed by a boundary beyond the Basic EPZ to include the area where a public education program is implemented. The Public Education Zone for Diablo Canyon consists of zones 13, 14, 15. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY : A situation, excluding events from nuclear warfare, leading to a release of a radioactive material at or produced by a fixed nuclear facility of a magnitude that exceeds or may exceed protective action guides. 93 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING: The operation of locating and measuring radiation by means of survey instruments which can detect and measure radiation. RECOVERY PHASE: The phase that begins at the end of the plume (Emergency) phase. The recovery phase includes decision making and operational actions associated with reentry of personnel into restricted areas, restoration of areas, return of individuals to areas that have been evacuated or restricted and relocation of individuals from areas where exposure rates exceed safe limits. REENTRY: Reentry is for essential personnel or the public to reenter a restricted area to perform critical functions under controlled conditions on a temporary basis. RELOCATION: Relocation represents the inability to restore affected areas to unrestricted use. People are removed or excluded from the areas not previously evacuated in order to avoid chronic radiation exposures in excess of established limits. ROENTGEN EQUIVALENT MAN (REM): The unit of dose equivalent of any ionizing radiation which produces the same biological absorbed dose of ordinary x-ray. A milliREM (mREM) is one-thousandth of a REM. RESTORATION: The process of reducing exposure rates and concentrations in the environment to acceptable levels before unrestricted or restricted use begins. RETURN: Recovery sub-phase when individuals are permitted to reoccupy previously restricted areas. Depending on residual exposure rates and the potential for re-suspension, precautions may be recommended. ROENTGEN (R): Is the unit of exposure. The term “dose”, sometimes used interchangeably with exposure, refers to absorbed ionizing energy. SHELTER: A structure or other location offering shielding from nuclear radiation in the environment. SHELTERING: The use of a structure for radiation protection from an airborne plume and/or deposited radioactive materials. SITE BOUNDARY: The perimeter surrounding the restricted area within which the power plant lies. For Diablo Canyon, an approximate ½ mile radius from the plant may be taken as the site boundary. SITE AREA EMERGENCY (SAE): Events are in process or have occurred which involve an actual or potential substantial degradation of the level of the plant or a security event that involves probable life threatening risk to site personnel or damage to site equipment because of hostile action. Any releases are expected to be limited to small fractions of the EPA Protection Action Guideline exposure levels. 94 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SPECIAL POPULATION: Are groups of individuals with physical or mental handicaps that need assistance when protective actions are implemented. TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER (TSC): The TSC is separated from but in close proximity to the plant Control Room which has the capability to display and transmit plant status to personnel responsible for engineering and management support of reactor operations in the event of an accident. TEDE Total effective dose equivalent. THYROID BLOCKING AGENCY: Or thyroid prophylaxis, a stable (non-radioactive) iodine administered to limit the uptake of ingested or inhaled radioiodine by the body. THYROID EXPOSURE: Radiation exposure to the thyroid through inhalation ingestion of radioactive materials. TOTAL EFFECTIVE DOSE EQUIVALENT (TEDE): See” Effective Dose Equivalent” UNUSUAL EVENT (UE): Same as Notification of Unusual Event - Events are in process of have occurred which indicate a potential degradation of the level of safety of the plant or indicate a security threat to facility protection has been initiated. No releases of radioactive material requiring offsite response or monitoring are expected unless further degradation of safety systems occurs. UNIFIED DOSE ASSESSMENT CENTER (UDAC): A location where offsite dose projections and recommendations for protective actions are developed and reviewed by the combined technical expertise of the utility, County, State, and Federal representatives. UDAC is co-located with the EOF and EOC. WHOLE BODY EXPOSURE: Direct external radiation exposure to the body from airborne radioactive materials or soil contamination. 95 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 ATTACHMENT 1.2: ACRONYMS ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable AMT Aerial Monitoring Team ANI American Nuclear Insures ARAC Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability ARC American Red Cross ARES Amateur Radio Emergency Services Cal OES California Emergency Management Agency CAL FIRE California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection CALTRANS California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) CANG California National Guard CAO County Administrative Officer CDCR California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation CDE Committed Doe Equivalent CDPH California Department of Public Health CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHA County Health Agency CHA DOC County Health Agency Department Operations Center CHP California Highway Patrol DCPP Diablo Canyon Power Plant DMS Disaster Medical Services DOE U.S. Department of Energy DPW&T Department of Public Works and Transportation 96 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 DSS California Department of Social Services DSW Disaster Service Worker EAL Emergency Action Level EARS Emergency Assessment and Response System EAS Emergency Alert System ECC Emergency Communications Center ECL Emergency Classification Level(s) EMAD Center Evacuee Monitoring Decontamination Center EMSA Emergency Medical Services Agency (local); Authority (State) EOC Emergency Operations Center EOF Emergency Operations Facility EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPZ Emergency Planning Zone ERM Emergency Response Manager ESD Emergency Services Director ETE Evacuation Time Estimate EWEC Emergency Worker Exposure Control EWS Early Warning System (sirens) FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FMT Field Monitoring Teams FRERP Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan – now part of the National Response Framework FRMAC Federal Radiological Monitoring & Assessment Center 97 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 GE General Emergency – NRC emergency classification level GIS Geographical Information System (Computerized Mapping) HP Health Physics / Health Physicist IC Incident Commander ICP Incident Command Post ICS Incident Command System IPZ Ingestion Pathway Zone JIC Joint Information Center JMC Joint Media Center – now JIC KI Potassium Iodide MIDAS Meteorological Information Dose Assessment System (Computer System) mR milliRoentgen mRem millirem NCRP National Council on Radiation Protection NIMS National Incident Management System NPP Nuclear Power Plant NPP ERP Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUE Notification of Unusual Event NUREG Nuclear Regulatory Document NWS National Weather Service OA Operational Area OEL Offsite Environmental Laboratory 98 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 OES Office of Emergency Services ORO Offsite Response Organization PAC Phone Assistance Center (Rumor Control) PAD Protective Action Decision PAG Protective Action Guidelines PAR Protective Action Recommendation PAZ Protective Action Zone PED Personal Electronic Dosimeter PEZ Public Education Zone PG&E Pacific Gas and Electric Company PHN Public Health Nurse PIC Pressurized Ion Chamber or Public Information Coordinator PIM Public Information Manager PIO Public Information Officer RACES Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service RAP Radiological Assistance Program (U.S. DOE) REAC/TS Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site REM Roentgen Equivalent Man REOC Regional Emergency Operation Center (State OES) REP Radiological Emergency Preparedness RHB Radiological Health Branch (of CDHS) SAE Site Area Emergency SDAC State Dose Assessment Center 99 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 SEMS Standardized Emergency Management System SOC State Operations Center (Cal OES) SOP Standard Operating Procedure SWC California State Warning Center TEDE Total Effective Dose Equivalent TLD Thermoluminescent Dosimeter TSC Technical Support Center UDAC Unified Dose Assessment Center UE Unusual Event, NRC Emergency Classification Level UHF Ultra High Frequency (a local government radio net) VHF Very High Frequency (a local government radio net) WC Watch Commander 100 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 ATTACHMENT 2: NUREG CROSSWALK 101 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 102 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 103 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 104 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 1, Section 7, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 105 i j S4 6 SH N 0ON 5 4 6 Kern S58 San Luis Obi s po Sa nt a Ba rba ra S.AN LUIS OBSPO COUNTY OFACE OF EJoERGENCY SERVICES PRCDUCEO BY TI-E SAN WIS OBISPO COUNTY AGRICULlURE DEPARTMENT GIS TEAM San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 FIGURE 2.1: REGIONAL LOCATION MAP 106 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES PRODUCED BY THE SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT GIS TEAM San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Eme Part 2, Administrative Plan FIGURE 3.1.1: NRC-DEFINED EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONES (EPZ) PLUME EPZ in SECTORS 107 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Section 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 FIGURE 3.1.2: NRC-DEFINED PROTECTIVE ACTION ZONE AND INGESTION PATHWAY ZONE (IPZ) 50 miles 10 miles 2 miles OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES PRODUCED BY THE SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT GIS TEAM S S 108 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 FIGURE 3.2: STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEFINED EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONE and PUBLIC EDUCATION ZONE 109 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part, Administrative Plan January 2014 FIGURE 3.3: INGESTION PATHWAY ZONE MAP 110 County Line SAN MIGUEL 101 PASO ROBLES CAMBRIA TEMPLETON N ATASCADERO CAYUCOS SANTA MARGARITA San Luis Obispo W 101 2 10 6 20 101 0 5 miles S County Line San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 FIGURE 3.4: WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION 060104/DCP P windrode map mile radius f rom DCPP Dir % Occurrence Mean Wind Speed (mph) N 2.75 4.9 NNE 2.15 2.5 NE 1.94 3.1 ENE 1.98 6.5 E 2.94 9.2 ESE 8.36 11.5 SE 34.13 15.2 SSE 10.19 9.7 S 3.06 7.3 SSW 3.11 6.7 SW 2.71 7.3 WSW 1.78 6.8 W 1.78 5.7 WNW 6.65 6.4 NW 11.56 7.3 NNW 4.91 6.7 Source: PG&E wind rose Map 6 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 111 FIGURE 3.5: MAJOR EVACUATION ROUTES San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 112 FIGURE 3.6: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 1 of 13) MAP 1 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 113 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 2 of 13) MAP 2 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 114 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 3 of 13) MAP 3 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 115 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 4 of 13) MAP 4 116 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 5 of 13) MAP 5 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 117 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 6 of 13) MAP 6 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 118 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 7 of 13) MAP 7 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 119 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 8 of 13) MAP 8 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 120 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 9 of 13) MAP 9 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 121 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 10 of 13) MAP 10 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 122 FIGURE 3.6: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 11 of 13) MAP 11 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 123 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 12 of 13) MAP 12 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 124 FIGURE 3.6 CONT: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES (Page 13 of 13) MAP 13 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 125 FIGURE 3.7: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES FOR RECEPTION AND CONGREGATE CARE CENTERS San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 126 FIGURE 3.8: LOCAL EVACUATION ROUTES PUBLIC SCHOOL RELOCATION CENTERS San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 127 FIGURE 3.9: GRAPHICAL DEPICTION OF KEY EVACUATION (Page 1 of 2) DAYTIME RESPONSE San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 128 FIGURE 3.9 CONT: GRAPHICAL DEPICTION OF KEY EVACUATION (Page 2 of 2) NIGHTTIME RESPONSE San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 129 FIGURE 4.1.1: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION 130 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 FIGURE 4.1.2: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – OPERATIONS SECTION 131 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 FIGURE 4.1.3: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – PLANS SECTION 132 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 FIGURE 4.1.4: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – LOGISTICS SECTION 133 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 FIGURE 4.1.5: COUNTY EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION – FINANCE AND ADMINSTRATION SECTION 134 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 FIGURE 4.2: INTERAGENCY EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION Lines of Command = Lines of Coordination Communication City Public Works US Department of Energy US Department of Homeland Security US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Other State Agency Support CA Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) CA Dept Public Health Santa Barbara County/Santa Maria City Manager PG&E/DCPP San Luis Obispo County Unified Command Group City Council City Fire City Police Other Federal Agency Support San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 135 FIGURE 5.1: RADIOLOGICAL PLUME ASSESSMENT ORGANIZATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 136 FIGURE 5.2: EVACUATION ROUTE FROM DIABLO CANYON POWER PLANT Evacuation Routes for DCPP Onsite Personnel Scale in Miles Source: DCPP Emergency Planning 2006 COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT COUNTY EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER PG&E EMERGENCY OPERATIONS FACILITY JOINT INFORMATION CENTER San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 137 TABLE 2.1: RELATIONSHIP OF WHOLE BODY DOSE TO HEALTH EFFECTS Representative Absorbed Dose of Nature of Whole Body (REM) Minimal dose detectable by chromosome analysis or other specialized analyses, but not by hemogram 5-2525 Minimal acute dose readily detectable in a specific individual (e.g., one who presents himself as a possible exposure case) 50-751 Minimal acute dose likely to produce vomiting in about 10 percent of people so exposed 75-1251 Acute dose likely to produce transient disability and clear hematological changes in a majority of people so exposed 150-2001 Median lethal dose for single short exposure, no medical treatment 3001 Median lethal dose for a single short exposure with supportive medical treatment (e.g., antibiotics and whole blood and platelet transfusions) 51026 25 Source: Basic Radiation Protection Criteria, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, NCRP Report No. 39, January 1971and NCRP Report No, 91, June 1987. 26 Source: Reactor Safety Study: An Assessment of Risks in U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants, (WASH-1400, NUREG 75/014) U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, October 1975 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 138 TABLE 2.2: RADIATION EXPOSURE CRITERIA GENERAL POPULATION Protective Action Guides 27 (PAGs) Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE): 1.0 REM Thyroid Committed Dose Equivalent (CDE): 5.0 REM EMERGENCY EXPOSURE GUIDELINES EMERGENCY WORKER EXPOSURE GUIDELINES NOTE: DO NOT EXCEED EXPOSURE or DOSE LIMITS LISTED BELOW WITHOUT COUNTY HEALTH OFFICER (CHO) AUTHORIZATION. Category PED Dose Limit Comments 1. EMERGENCY EXPOSURE GUIDELINES Administrative Exposure ( DDE dose) Limit 1,000 mrem (1.00 rem) DDE dose Administrative Exposure limit for emergency workers is set at 1,000 mrem DDE dose. Unless authorized to continue work, return to your EWEC Command Center, or other location as directed, immediately. Emergency Activities Up to 5,000 mrem (5 rem) TEDE dose The CHO must authorize exposure in excess of 1,000 mrem DDE dose. If authorized, you may receive up to 5,000 mrem TEDE dose for emergency activities. Activities to protect valuable property where lower dose is not practical. Up to 10,000 mrem (10 rem) TEDE dose With CHO authorization, up to 10,000 mrem TEDE dose may be authorized for protection of valuable property where a lower dose is not practical. Volunteers Only. Safety Briefing. Life-saving activities or protection of large populations where lower dose is not practical. Up to 25,000 mrem (25 rem) TEDE dose. With CHO authorization, volunteers may be authorized up to 25,000 mrem (25 rem) TEDE dose for the purpose of life saving actions or the protection of large populations where a lower dose is not practical. Volunteers Only. Safety Briefing Extraordinary Life- saving activities or protection of large populations where lower dose is not practical 25,000-75,0000 mrem (25-75 rem) TEDE dose. With CHO authorization, volunteers may be authorized up to 75,000 mrem (75 rem) TEDE dose for the purpose of extraordinary life-saving activities or protection of large populations where lower dose is not practical and ONLY if they have been made fully aware of the risks. Volunteers Only. Safety Briefing 27 Source: U.S. EPA 400 -R-92-001 (May 92) Manual of Protective Action Guides and Protective Actions for Nuclear Incidents San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 139 TABLE 3.1: EMERGENCY PLANNING ZONE DESCRIPTIONS PROTECTIVE ACTION ZONES (PAZ) (Sheet 1 of 2) PAZs approximately 0 - 10 miles from Diablo Canyon Power Plant AREA OF PRIMARY OVERSIGHT BY US DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (PAZ) Designation PAZ Includes 1 2 - miles Identified residences, isolated hill areas within 2 miles of the plant 2 6 - miles Identified residences, plant access road, upper segments of See Canyon and Prefumo Canyon Road, Montana de Oro State Park and isolated hill areas extending out to 6 mile radius of the plant. 3 Avila/San Luis Bay/ See Canyon/ Squire Canyon Avila Beach, Port San Luis, Pirate's Cove, San Luis Bay Estates, Avila Road, San Luis Bay Drive, See Canyon Road outside the 6-mile limit. Squire and Gragg Canyons and Sunset Palisades extending to the east and south to about 9 or 10 miles from the plant 4 Prefumo Canyon/Los OsosValley Prefumo Canyon Road, outside 6-mile limit. Los Osos Valley Road between Turri Road and Foothill Boulevard extending out to approximately 10 miles from the plant 5 Baywood/Los Osos Baywood Park, Los Osos, Turri Road, Los Osos Valley Road west of Turri Road, Clark Valley extending to the north approximately 10 miles from the plant. -----------------AREAS EXCEEDING 10-Mile NRC EPZ----------------- AREA OF PRIMARY OVERSIGHT BY STATE OF CALIFORNIA (PAZ) Designation PAZ Includes 6 City of Pismo Beach City of Pismo Beach (including beaches), Shell Beach, south of Spyglass Drive (including adjacent beaches). 7 Indian Knob/Price Canyon Price Canyon Road and isolated hill areas north of Pismo Beach. 8 San Luis Obispo Area City of San Luis Obispo, Cal Poly, Calif. Men's Colony, Camp San Luis Obispo, Cuesta College, O'Connor Way, Orcutt Road north of East Corral de Piedra Creek, San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 140 o Edna, Country Club, and Davenport Creek area. 9 Morro Bay/ Cayucos State Highway 1 west Cuesta College, Morr Bay, Cayucos, Whale Rock Reservoir area. 10 Five Cities (southern portion) City of Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, Oceano, Halcyon, and Pismo State Beach. 11 Orcutt Road/Lopez Drive/State Highway 227 Canyon area north of Five Cities (bounded by Price Canyon, Orcutt Road, Huasna Creek and northern limits of Arroyo Grande and Pismo Beach). 12 Nipomo north of Willow Road Nipomo Mesa north of Willow Road, Cienga Valley, Pismo Dunes State Recreational Vehicle Area. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 141 TABLE 3.1: PUBLIC EDUCATION ZONE DESCRIPTIONS (Sheet 2 of 2) AREA WHERE ANY SUBSEQUENT PROTECTIVE ACTIONS WOULD BE DONE ON AN AD HOC BASIS Public Education Zone (PEZ) Designation PEZ Includes 13 Nipomo Nipomo Mesa south of Willow Road, Nipomo Valley, Santa Maria Valley north of Santa Maria and Cuyama Rivers. 14 Cuesta Pass/ Santa Margarita U.S. 101 north of San Luis Obispo, Santa Margarita, isolated hill areas north and east of San Luis Obispo within 20 miles of plant 15 State Highway 41/ Old Creek Road State Highway 1 north of Cayucos, Old Creek Road, State Highway 41, isolated hill areas north and east of Cayucos and Morro Bay within 20 miles of the plant. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 142 TABLE 3.2.1: EPZ PERMANENT RESIDENT POPULATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 143 TABLE 3.2.2: PERMANENT RESIDENT VEHCILES BY PAZ San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 144 TABLE 3.3.1: SUMMARY OF POPULATION DEMAND San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 145 TABLE 3.3.2: SUMMARY OF VEHICLE DEMAND 146 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 TABLE 3.4: RECOMMENDED PROTECTIVE ACTIONS14 Projected Dose (REM) to the Population (a) Recommended Protective Actions (b) Comments TEDE - less than 1.0 REM AND No planned protective actions beyond those actions followed in appropriate Standard Operating Procedures. (c) Off-site authorities may take precautionary actions. Previously directed protective actions may be reconsidered or terminated. Thyroid CDE - less than 5.0 REM TEDE - ≥ 1.0 REM OR Evacuate. or Shelter in Place (d) Sheltering should be the preferred protective action when it will provide protection equal to evacuation or, if evacuation is not feasible. Institutionalized persons who are not readily mobile and are treated as a special group by off-site authorities may be sheltered. Thyroid CDE - ≥ 5.0 REM Order ingestion of KI for general population for Thyroid CDE > 5.0 (f) Thyroid CDE- ≥5.0 REM Administer thyroid blocking for the appropriate emergency workers and institutionalized persons. (e) (f) Thyroid blocking may be authorized by off- site authorities for populations which cannot be evacuated. (a) Dose thresholds are expressed in terms of Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) and Thyroid Committed Dose Equivalent (CDE). (b) These actions are a recommendation for planning purposes. At the time of the incident, Protective Action Decisions (PAD) should take existing conditions into consideration (e.g., plant conditions, adverse weather, evacuation time estimates, projected plume arrival time, competing disasters, etc.). (c) Off-site authorities may implement low impact protective and precautionary actions to reduce potential health effects from radiation exposure. (d) Sheltering should always be implemented in cases when evacuation is not carried out at projected TEDE of 1.0 REM or more. And except in very unusual circumstances, should never be relied upon at projected doses greater than 10.0 REM TEDE (e) In the event that an institutionalized person is under 18 years of age, thyroid blocking medication may be administered for thyroid CDE >5 REM (f) May also order ingestion if (1) a release of radioactive iodine occurs that poses a threat to public health or (2) when the release information is unknown but other environmental and plant conditions suggest KI ingestion may be a prudent measure. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 147 TABLE 3.5.1: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 90 PERCENT OF POPULATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 148 TABLE 3.5.1 CONT: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 90 PERCENT OF POPULATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 149 TABLE 3.5.1 CONT: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 90 PERCENT OF POPULATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 150 TABLE 3.5.2: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 100 PERCENT OF POPULATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 151 TABLE 3.5.2 CONT: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 100 PERCENT OF POPULATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 152 TABLE 3.5.2 CONT: EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE BY SCENARIO AND CONDITIONS – 100 PERCENT OF POPULATION San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 153 TABLE 3.6: EVACUATION TIMES STUDY EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE UPDATED INFORMATION REGARDING THE EVACUATION TIMES ESTIMATE AFTER AN EARTHQUAKE WILL BE DETAILED IN THE COUNTY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 154 TABLE 3.7: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS AT THE FOUR EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVELS (Sheet 1 of 4) UNUSUAL EVENT Provide fire, emergency medical or law enforcement assistance if requested. ● Promptly inform County, State and offsite company support agencies of the ALERT or higher condition and its status. ● Escalate to a more severe class. ● Escalate to a more severe class. ● OR OR Standby of designated County Emergency Services Staff until verbal closeout. ● Close out with verbal summary to offsite support agencies followed by written summary within 24 hours. ● Release of public information as necessary. ● Assess and respond. ● Notify agencies and personnel indicated on Watch Commander’s notification list (County Sheriff, County Office of Emergency Services, and activate the Red Phone ● Augment on-shift resources as required ● Provide fire, emergency medical or law enforcement assistance if requested. ● Promptly inform County, State and offsite company support agencies of nature of the unusual event. ● General Actions of County or Local Authorities General Actions of Plant Staff San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 155 TABLE 3.7: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS AT THE FOUR EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVELS (Sheet 2 of 4) ALERT General Actions of Plant Staff General Actions of County or Local Authorities consider actions listed for UE plus the following: ● Promptly inform County, State and offsite company support agencies of nature of the unusual event. ● Augment resources by activating onsite Technical Support Center, onsite Operational Support Center and Emergency Operations Facilities. ● Assess and respond. ● Dispatch onsite monitoring teams and associated communications as required. ● Provide periodic Meteorological assessments to offsite authorities. ● Provide periodic plant status updates to offsite authorities at least every 45 minutes. ● Provide a dedicated individual (advisor to the County Emergency Organization) for plant status updates to offsite authorities and periodic media briefings (joint with offsite authorities). ● Close out by verbal summary to offsite authorities followed by written summary within 24 hours. OR ● Escalate to a more severe class. All responders will follow their Standard Operation Procedures which may include but not limited to the following: ● Activate the County Emergency Operations Center, JIC, PAC and Field Monitoring Teams. ● Provide assistance requested, as available. ● Notification of all local, state, and federal officials involved in emergency response. ● Alert to standby status key emergency personnel and associated communications. ● Provide confirmatory offsite radiation monitoring and ingestion pathway dose projections ● County / State Parks and Beaches may be closed according to authorized jurisdiction’s SOPs as appropriate. ● County Superintendent of Schools will consult with Bellevue- Santa Fe School and all District Superintendents regarding possible relocation. Relocation of certain schools may occur at this stage. Buses may be directed to standby at appropriate schools to facilitate the possible relocation of students, faculty and staff as the situation necessitates . ● Place EAS on standby. ● Request Cal OES to notify Camp Roberts and place National Guard and Camp Roberts on standby as necessary. ● Consider implementing precautionary actions. ● Consider opening or putting on standby all or some of the following facilities: Monitoring, Decontamination, Reception and Congregate Care facilities. ● Consider request DCPP to have an American Nuclear Insurer’s respond to County Counsel. ● Maintain ALERT status until closeout or reduction of emergency class. OR ● Escalate to SITE AREA EMERGENCY or higher class. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 156 TABLE 3.7: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS AT THE FOUR EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVELS (Sheet 3 of 4) SITE AREA EMERGENCY General Actions of Plant Staff General Actions of County or Local Authorities ● Promptly inform County, State, and offsite company support agencies of the Site Area Emergency condition and its status. ● Augment resources by activating onsite Technical Support Center, onsite Operational Support Center, and offsite Recovery Center. ● Assess and respond. ● Dispatch onsite monitoring teams and associated communications. ● Provide a dedicated individual (advisor to County Emergency Organization) for plant status updates to offsite authorities and periodic media briefings (joint with offsite authorities). ● Make senior technical and management staff onsite available for consultation with NRC and State authorities on a periodic basis. ● Provide meteorological and dose estimates to offsite authorities for actual releases via a dedicated individual or automated data transmission. ● Provide release and dose projections based on available plant condition information and foreseeable contingencies. ● Close out or recommend reduction in emergency class by briefing of offsite authorities at County Emergency Operations Center by phone followed by written summary within 24 hours. OR ● Escalate to General Emergency class. Complete the actions for ALERT, if appropriate, plus the following: ● Notification of key local, state, and federal officials involved in emergency response. ● Activation of the Emergency Operations Center, and Field Monitoring Team. ● Activate JIC and PAC provide joint media briefings with DCPP/PG&E and various agencies. ● Provide assistance requested, as available. ● Dispatch key emergency personnel, including monitoring teams and associated communications as appropriate ● Consider sheltering or evacuating. Assess need to extend precautionary actions. (County and State Parks and Beaches may be closed according to authorized jurisdiction’s SOPs) ● Alert to standby status other emergency personnel (e.g., those needed for evacuation) and dispatch personnel to near-site duty stations. ● Consider implementing school relocation and limiting hospital admissions. ● Provide monitoring results to DCPP and others and jointly assess data (use UDAC). ● Assess need for preventive and protective agriculture measures. ● Continuously assess information from DCPP and offsite monitoring with regard to changes to protective actions already initiated for public and mobilizing evacuation resources. ● Activate Monitoring and Decontamination, Reception and Congregate Care facilities as appropriate. ● Mobilize response staff necessary to conduct operations throughout EPZ. ● Maintain SITE AREA EMERGENCY status until closeout or reduction of emergency class. OR ● Escalate to GENERAL EMERGENCY class. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 157 TABLE 3.7: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS AT THE FOUR EMERGENCY CLASSIFICATION LEVELS (Sheet 4 of 4) GENERAL EMERGENCY General Actions of Plant Staff General Actions of County or Local Authorities ● Promptly inform County, State and offsite company support agencies of the General Emergency condition and its status. ● Augment resources by activating onsite Technical Support Center, onsite Operational Support Center, and Emergency Operations Center. ● Assess and respond ● Evacuate nonessential people from the site. ● Dispatch onsite and offsite monitoring teams and associated communications. ● Provide a dedicated individual (Advisor to County Emergency Organization) for plant status updates to offsite authorities and periodic media briefings (joint with offsite authorities). ● Make senior technical and management staff onsite available for consultation with NRC and the State on a periodic basis. ● Provide meteorological and dose estimates to offsite authorities for actual releases via a dedicated individual or automated data tran smission. ● Provide release and dose projections based On available plant condition information and foreseeable contingencies. ● Close out or recommend reduction of emergency class by briefing of offsite authorities at County Emergency Operations Center by phone followed by written summary within 24 hours. Complete the actions for SITE AREA EMERGENCY, if appropriate, and include the following: ● Notification of key local, state and federal officials involved in emergency response. ● Provide assistance requested, as available. ● Activate the County Emergency Operations Center, JIC and PAC. ● Activate public notification of emergency status and provide public periodic updates. (Use EAS) ● Shelter or evacuate as appropriate. Assess need to extend protective actions. • Use Siren Systems as appropriate if public protective actions are ordered ● Dispatch key emergency personnel including monitoring teams and associated communications. ● Dispatch other emergency personnel to duty stations within Emergency Planning Zone and alert all others to standby status. ● Provide monitoring results to PG&E, if any, and others in UDAC and continually assess information from PG&E and offsite monitoring with regard to changes to protective actions already initiated for the public and mobilizing evacuation resources. ● Assess need for action to prevent or mitigate Ingestion pathway exposure and recommend preventative and protective measures. ● Consider relocation to an alternate EOC if actual dose accumulation in near-site EOC exceeds lower bound of EPA Protective Action Guides. ● Maintain GENERAL EMERGENCY status until closeout or reduction of emergency class. San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 158 TABLE 3.7: GUIDANCE ON INITIATION AND DURATION OF RELEASE IF A RELEASE OCCURS Source: NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, 1980 Section I.D, Planning Basis, Table 2 Time from initiating event to start of atmospheric release 0.5 hour to 1 day Time period over which radioactive material may be continuously released 0.5 hour to several days Time at which major portion of release may occur 0.5 hour to 1 day after start of release Travel time for release to exposure point (time after release) 5 miles: 0.5 to 2 hours 10 miles: 1 to 4 hours 159 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 TABLE 7.3-1: TRAINING MATRIX San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 160 TABLE 7.3-2: SOP NUMERICAL LISTINGS Part Three Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Numerical Listing NPP SOPS SOP No. SOP Title Responsible Organization / Authenticator III.01 Emergency Services Director County Administrative Officer III.02 County Sheriff’s Department Sheriff III.02A County Sheriff’s Watch Commander Procedures Sheriff III.03 CAL FIRE/County Fire Department County Fire Chief III.04 County Public Works and Transportation Public Works Director III.05 County Public Health Agency Health Agency Director III.06 County Environmental Health Environmental Health Director 06-HP1 Offsite Dose Assessment Environmental Health Director 06-HP1A Offsite Dose Assessment-Computerized Environmental Health Director 06-HP2 Protective Action Guidelines Environmental Health Director 06-HP3 Emergency Environmental Monitoring Environmental Health Director 06-HP6 Vehicle Monitoring Environmental Health Director 06-HP7 Evacuee Decontamination-Camp Roberts County Health Officer 06-HP8 Area, Vehicle, and Equipment Decon County Health Officer 06-HP9 Emergency Worker Decon County Health Officer 06-HP11 Emergency Worker Exposure Control County Health Officer 06-HP12 Unified Dose Assessment Environmental Health Director 06-HP15 Southern Evacuee Monitoring, Decon (EMAD) and Reception Center Operations Santa Barbara County III.07 Department of Social Services DSS Director III.08 Public Information Officer County PIO/OES Manager III.10 General Services Agency General Services Director III.11 County Counsel Dept Head or Lead County Counsel III.12 County Agriculture Commissioner Ag Commissioner III.13 Air Pollution Control District Supervisor Air Quality Specialist III.14 Plans Emergency Services Manager III.15 Logistics Emergency Services Manager III.16 Operations Emergency Services Manager III.17 Incident Command Post Emergency Services Manager III.20 California Highway Patrol CHP Commander III.21 Caltrans Caltrans III.22 State Parks and Recreation State Parks and Recreation III.23 American Red Cross American Red Cross San Luis Obispo County/Cities Part 2, Administrative Plan Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan January 2014 161 SOP No. SOP Title Responsible Organization / Authenticator III.24 Cal Poly Cal Poly III.25 USCG USCG Morro Bay III.30 City of Morro Bay Fire Chief of Morro Bay III.31 City of San Luis Obispo Fire Chief of SLO City III.32 City of Pismo Beach City Manager/Police Chief III.33 City of Arroyo Grande Police Chief III.34 City of Grover Beach Police Chief III.41 Cayucos Fire Protection District Fire Chief III.44 Port San Luis Harbor District Harbor Master III.50 County Office of Education County Office of Education III.51 San Luis Coastal Unified School District Superintendent III.53 Cayucos Elementary School Superintendent/Principal III.54 Lucia Mar Unified School District Superintendent III.55 Cuesta College College President III.56 Paso Robles Event Center Paso Robles Event Center III.57 Bellevue Santa-Fe Charter School Superintendent/Principal III.58 Before/After School Care Providers County Office of Education III.59 Nipomo Evacuation Center Superintendent III.60 RACES Comm Shop Director III.62 Private Schools County Office of Education III.64 Route Alerting and Carless Collection OES Manager * Gaps in numbering indicate SOPs that have been deleted or combined. 162 San Luis Obispo County/Cities Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Plan Part 2, Administrative Plan January 2014 TABLE 7.3-3: BLOCK DIAGRAM CROSS REFERENCE City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan Adverse Weather • Drought • Erosion • Storm • Windstorms • Severe Winter Storm • Localized Flooding • Severe Heat ANNEX H Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Prepared by: David L. Mathe Disaster Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 2 of 16 FORWARD Annex H, City of San Luis Obispo Adverse Weather Emergency Management Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to adverse weather. Response measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Organization are contained herein. Coordinated Response It is recognized that if major adverse weather impacts the City of San Luis Obispo and is regional in nature, Unified Command will be charged with coordinating the response. ICS/SEMS/NIMS The City of San Luis Obispo has adopted the Incident Command System (ICS), the Standardized Emergency System (SEMS), and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) as the emergency organization and the emergency management system for response to damaging adverse weather impacting the City of San Luis Obispo. Unified Incident Command Authority In the event of adverse weather, the Fire Chief will assume the position of Unified Incident Commander. In the event the Fire Chief is not available, the following chain of command is provided to identify authorized alternates to fill the City of San Luis Obispo's position as Incident Commander. No. 1 –Public Works Director (Flooding)/ Deputy Fire Chief, or On-Duty Fire Battalion Chief No. 2 –Public Works person as appointed by the Public Works Director (Flooding) No. 3 – The On-Duty highest ranking Fire Officer or Police Officer The Unified Incident Commander will: Alert the San Luis Obispo City Manager as to the severity of the incident. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Persons with Access and Functional Needs It is the intent of the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that Persons with Functional and Access Needs have equal services that are provided to the citizens of San Luis Obispo and are a priority during an emergency. _________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 3 of 16 Date: Adverse Weather Table of Contents Section Page Forward 2 Table of Contents 3 I. Essentials 5 A. Adverse Weather Advisory 5 B. Initiating Event 6 C. Adverse Weather Plan Activation 6 D. Initial Alerting 6 II. Response 7 A. Emergency Operations Center Locations 7 B. Emergency Operations Center-Levels of Activation 7 C. Emergency Response Levels 8 D. Situation Awareness Reporting 8 E. Situation Reporting Zones 9 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities 10 G. San Luis Obispo County Resources 10 III. Hazard Assessment 10 A. Hazard Assessment 10 IV. Potential Impacts 11 1. Leadership 11 2. Situation Reporting 11 3. Building Collapse/Rescue 12 4. Multiple Casualties 12 5. School Disruptions 12 6. Hazardous Materials release 12 7. Fires 12 8. Evacuation 12 9. Utilities—Natural Gas—Electric—Water—Sanitation 12 10. Transportation System 13 11. Communications 13 12. Emergency Public Information 13 V. Emergency Recovery 14 A. Re-entry 14 B. Demobilization 14 C. Final Report and Activity Log 14 City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 4 of 16 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption 15 B. Purpose 15 C. Authorities 15 D. Scope 15 E. Plan Revisions 16 City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 5 of 16 I. Essentials A. Adverse Weather Drought: Periods of drought can have significant environmental, agricultural, health, economic and social consequences. Drought can also reduce water quality, because lower water flows reduce dilution of pollutants and increase contamination of remaining water sources. Wildfires are typically larger and more severe in periods of drought due to the lower fuel moisture content. Erosion: erosion is a natural geological process caused by currents, storms, earthquakes, winds, and the gradual movement of tectonic plates. It may take place slowly over thousands of years, or it may occur dramatically, as with landslides or severe storms. Rates of erosion are reported as a yearly average. Local annual erosion rates range from three inches a year to over one foot. However, this pattern is not indicative of future annual changes. Storm: Storms usually do most of their damage in the form of erosion and localized flooding. The winds originate from low-pressure systems offshore and circulate counterclockwise around the low. The duration of such a storm, can be the most significant measure of its destructiveness. Wind Storms: Refers to any dangerous meteorological phenomena with the potential to cause damage, serious social disruption, or loss of human life. Severe windstorms pose a significant risk to life and property in the region by creating conditions that disrupt essential systems such as public utilities, telecommunications, and transportation routes. High winds can and do occasionally cause tornado-like damage to local homes and businesses. Severe windstorms can present a very destabilizing effect on the dry brush that covers local hillsides and wildla nd urban interface areas. High winds can have destructive impacts, especially to property trees, power lines, and other utility services. Severe Winter Storm: Severe winter storms are a combination of high winds and heavy rains. These events occur on a regular basis when two fronts combine to create the storm. Localized Flooding: Advisories, watches and warnings are often issued by the National Weather Service regarding storms or floods. The basis of these advisories is predictable weather patterns and existing knowledge of the flooding history of an area. For all practical purposes, these notifications require nothing more than a heightened level of awareness on the part of both emergency responders and the general public. Flood Advisory – Minor general or area flooding of streets, low-lying areas, urban storm drains, creeks, and small streams is occurring, imminent, or highly likely. City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 6 of 16 Flood Watch is issued when conditions are favorable for flooding. It does not mean flooding will occur, but it is possible. Flood Warning is issued when flooding is imminent or occurring. Severe Heat: In the event of an extended Severe Heat period, the event will be led from the appropriate Department Operations Center (DOC). B. Initiating Event Adverse weather is the initiating event that alerts the public and the City of San Luis Obispo. The focal point for reporting initial adverse weather damage is the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Communications Center. C. Plan Activation It is the policy of the City of San Luis Obispo that adverse weather, as referenced in this Plan, and in the judgment of the City Manager, Fire Chief or Police Chief, or their designee, warrants activation of this plan. If confirmed damage is brought to the attention of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center, contact with the Unified Incident Commander (or authorized alternate) should be attempted. If contact is possible, the Unified Incident Commander or alternate would be advised of the situation, including initial damage reports. If contact with the Unified Incident Commander or any authorized alternate cannot be made, the Deputy Fire Chief or on-duty Battalion Chief or highest-ranking Police Officer may recommend Plan activation. D. Initial Alerting Upon Plan activation, the San Luis Obispo Emergency Communications Center will notify City departments of Plan and Emergency Operations Center activation. EOC mobilization instructions are as follows: The on-duty dispatchers (with the assistance of on-duty support staff) will: Notify the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads and have them report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Alert all off-duty police, fire, public works, utilities, Parks and Recreation and Community Development building inspectors. Poll police and fire units and stations for damage assessment and available resources. Alert on-duty police and fire units and instruct them to begin Situation Reporting in the San Luis Obispo Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ). City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 7 of 16 II. Response A. Emergency Operations Center Locations: The following are the EOC locations for an emergency event. (Note: These locations may be adjusted or changed depending on the specific circumstances of the event). EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) Primary: San Luis Obispo City Fire Department 2160 Santa Barbara Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Secondary: Ludwick Community Center 864 Santa Rosa Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 B. Emergency Operations Center – Levels of Activation The number of City staff at the EOC will depend on the level of activation. The person authorizing the activation of the EOC will determine the Level of Activation. The Emergency Services Director or Deputy Emergency Services Director may change the activation level throughout the emergency as needed. The levels of activation are: EOC LEVEL 1 A major disaster where local resources are overwhelmed. State and/or federal resources are required. A local emergency and a state of emergency will be proclaimed. A Presidential Declaration of Emergency or major disaster will be requested. The EOC will be staffed to the highest number of personnel possible or necessary. EOC LEVEL 2 A moderate to severe emergency wherein local resources are not adequate and mutual aid may be required on a regional or even statewide basis. A local emergency and a state of emergency may be proclaimed. The EOC will be moderately staffed. EOC LEVEL 3 A minor to moderate incident wherein local resources are adequate and available. A local emergency may or may not be declared. The EOC will be minimally staffed. Note: Upon activation of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Emergency Operations Center, contact will be established with the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services. City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 8 of 16 C. Emergency Response Levels Emergency response for adverse weather emergencies is broken down into three levels: Level 1, Severe Emergency: Total recall of all off-duty police, fire department personnel, and request the San Luis Obispo City Manager and all department heads report to the City’s Emergency Operations Center. Level 2, Escalating Emergency: Increased number of incidents due to damaging adverse weather. On-duty crews cannot keep up with calls. The incident can be handled by calling out all off-duty public works department employees and with the assistance of on-duty fire and police units. Level 3, Non-Emergency: Always in effect day-to-day routine operations. No excessive incidents. On-duty crews can handle all calls. D. Situation Awareness Reporting 1. General The priority upon plan activation is situation reporting: the process of getting a complete and comprehensive picture of the damages caused by the event. Immediately after damaging adverse weather, situation reporting may be minimal. It is recognized that complete damage intelligence may take several hours to several days to get a complete and stable citywide assessment. Continuing situation reporting is critically important and is the foundation on which EOC/field actions are based. Every effort must be made to immediately initiate a field survey within a Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ) and to gather the best available information, and report that information through channels to the City of San Luis Obispo EOC as soon as possible. Situation Reports may become available from the other sources, i.e.: General Public News and Social Media San Luis Obispo County Emergency Communications Center San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services City of San Luis Obispo Radio equipped field units Caltrans California Highway Patrol SEMPRA (formerly known as Southern California Gas Company) San Luis Coastal Unified School District Pacific Gas and Electric (PG & E) Area Medical Centers City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 9 of 16 The individual field Situation Reporting Groups within the Operations Section will conduct a field survey of an area or Situation Reporting Zone (SRZ). Early reports may include the following: Rescue needs (estimated number trapped) Serious mass injuries (estimated number) Deceased (estimated number) Damaging adverse weather Serious hazardous material spills Any other critical emergency or situation observed E. Situation Reporting Zones In the event of a damaging event, the City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into three Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ’s). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no damage occurs within an SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 10 of 16 F. Situation Zone Responsibilities DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBILITY Police Department Citywide primary survey for all damages Fire Department Citywide survey for damage, rescue, injuries and fire Public Works Citywide survey for streets, facilities and, parks damage, bridges and culverts Information Technology Citywide survey for communication damage Community Development Citywide survey of critical facilities for adverse weather- related damage, structural damage, and posting of unsafe buildings Utilities Citywide survey of freshwater and waste disposal systems PG & E Utilities Survey for condition of their transmission lines San Luis Coastal Unified School District Survey for condition of their facility and personnel Caltrans Jurisdictional survey for State highways G. San Luis Obispo County Resources The Office of Emergency Services (OE S) coordinates all requests for assistance from San Luis Obispo County (beyond mutual aid agreements established for fire, law, medical, or public works resources). To request assistance from San Luis Obispo County, contact the Duty Officer at 805.781.1144. The American Red Cross works together with the Care and Shelter Branch to identify and establish evacuation and general population shelter sites. In most cases the Care and Shelter Branch provides a supporting role to the American Red Cross. III. Hazard Assessment The City of San Luis Obispo Hazard Identification and Analysis process used the FEMA Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. General Responsibilities Listed below is a general assessment that may result from damaging adverse weather. The exact circumstances of adverse weather may dictate some flexibility and adjustments. A. Hazard Assessment 1. Situations Any one of the adverse weather events may be considered a threat to the City of San Luis Obispo. 2. Potential Threats City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 11 of 16 Threats as the result of adverse weather impacting San Luis Obispo may range from erosion, winds and localized flooding; Windstorm may damage residences, businesses, trees, and power lines. 3. Potential Range of Damage Most of the adverse weather causes little or no damage. IV. Potential Impacts This Section does not presume to predict the full range and depth of adverse weather impacts. The following, attempts to present the most likely impacts from adverse weather occurring in or near the City of San Luis Obispo: 1. Leadership 2. Situation reporting 3. Building collapse causing need for rescue 4. Multiple Casualties 5. School disruptions 6. Hazardous material releases 7. Fires 8. Evacuation 9. Utilities – Natural Gas, Electricity and Sanitation 10. Transportation systems 11. Communications 12. Emergency Public Information 1. Leadership: The strain on local government and its emergency response organization to command and coordinate the response to adverse weather could be immediate, severe, and overwhelming. Initial out-of-county assistance will probably not occur within the first 24 hours. Full assistance from out of county departments may not arrive until well after the first 72 hours. San Luis Obispo must presume that they will essentially be on their own, with only local surviving resources, for 72 hours. It is estimated that full mobilization of local government personnel will be difficult due to internal casualties, transportation disruptions, and family status concerns. 2. Situation Reporting: City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 12 of 16 An overall assessment and prioritization of emergencies/hazards through a centralized means of situation reporting will be one of the first critical actions. On-duty radio-equipped public safety and public services units may be the only means available to provide an initial survey of field areas and report damage information. Due to several factors (massive damage, limited personnel, transportation disruptions, communications overload, etc.), a complete situation reporting picture may take several hours to several days. 3. Building Collapse/Rescue: The structures that will most commonly receive damage and fail in adverse weather are structures adjacent o flowing water or adjacent to large trees. The collapse of such buildings is often responsible for many casualties and the need for rescue. 4. Multiple Casualties See Annex C, Multiple Casualty Incident of this Plan for additional information. 5. School Disruptions: Should school be in session during major adverse weather, some serious injuries of students and faculty can be anticipated. Schools would be immediately disrupted requiring them to either close or evacuate. 6. Hazardous Materials Releases: Refer to Annex B, Hazardous Materials Annex for additional information. 7. Fires: Refer to Annex E, Fire Annex for additional information. 8. Evacuation: Evacuation that may be required because of adverse weather will be a high priority. 9. Utilities: Natural Gas, Electricity, Water, Sanitation Normal utility systems may fail or be disrupted. Electrical power loss would primarily be from breakage of overhead wires. Water line breakage should be expected. Localized damage to pump stations and storage facilities is anticipated. City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 13 of 16 Water System contamination may occur. The city wastewater and water treatment plants may be damaged. 10. Transportation Systems: Adverse weather could disrupt normal transportation systems. The primary cause of surface transportation failure would be from road deformation, landslides, water flowing in streets and the loss of bridges. Power outages will impact traffic signals. Surface street blockage by debris would also cause delays and temporary road closures. 11. Communications: Normal means for reporting emergencies/hazards via a 911 phone dependent system may be lost to the general public. Adverse weather may disable the telephone system. Telephone equipment, both hard wired and cell sites, could be adversely affected primarily by overloading and physical damage. Essential service lines will most likely survive and can typically primarily be relied upon in implementing this Plan. Effective radio communications may require the augmentation of ARES personnel and/or the use of "car to car" relay systems. In the absence of emergency power to some agency base stations, portable radios may be the only available means of radio communications. 12. Emergency Public Information: During and following adverse weather, the public will need basic emergency public information. This information will be provided by the City of San Luis Obispo's Public Information Officer via: Emergency Broadcast Messages over the Emergency Alerting System (EAS) Social Media AM/FM Radio Stations City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 14 of 16 Local network television V. Emergency Recovery The City of San Luis Obispo has a Recovery Plan, in the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. The following points are a short overview of items covered in more detail in that document. A. Re-Entry During transition into a recovery phase, areas affected by adverse weather should be inspected to determine if they are safe for public re-entry. Based on joint concurrence by the Unified Command Staff, state or federal representatives, re-entry will be authorized, and a Public Information message to that effect will be issued. B. Demobilization When response departments are nearing completion of the last remaining life-safety Protective Action Missions, and when the Emerg ency Services Director (San Luis Obispo City Manager) or the Deputy Emergency Services Director (Assistant City Manager) determines that the disaster has entered into a recovery phase, the command staff should develop a formal demobilization plan. Consideration should also be given to assigning appropriate departments to conduct short term recovery operations (e.g., debris removal, restoration of critical facilities, utilities and communications, and tending to the needs of the displaced, etc.) The City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center should be downgraded as an Emergency Operations Center and then become a Recovery Operations Center (ROC). It is desirable to attempt to restore departments to their normal working routine and environment as soon as possible. The Unified Command Staff, as well as other City of San Luis Obispo departments, will be heavily involved in short and long-term recovery operations. C. Final Report and Activity Log All department heads from the City of San Luis Obispo departments involved in the adverse weather response will be required to complete a narrative report and a master activity log. The narrative report briefly describes the primary responsibility, the protective action missions performed and the total staff hours of involvement by the agency during the emergency phase of the adverse weather. The master activity log documents names and times of agency personnel involved in a mission, equipment and supplies used, and any contracts with a private vendor to support emergency operations. Most of this information can be extrapolated from individual activity logs used by team leaders during the emergency (ICS 214, EOC messages, EOC activity logs). A copy of the narrative report and activity logs should be forwarded to the Plans Section as soon as possible and will be part of the official record of the adverse weather disaster. City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 15 of 16 VI. Plan Administration A. Plan Adoption This is the official San Luis Obispo City Plan for responding to adverse weather occurring in, or threatening, the City of San Luis Obispo. The Plan's responsibilities and authorities are effective as indicated below. B. Purpose The purpose of this Plan is to establish the City of San Luis Obispo's response organization, Leadership authority, responsibilities, functions and interactions required to mitigate the effects of adverse weather affecting the City of San Luis Obispo. The priority of emergency response to a damaging event shall be to minimize loss of life and property. The Plan is designed to unify all response departments under the Incident Command System (ICS) in order to best utilize joint resources and more effectively minimize damage to life and property caused by the effects of adverse weather. C. Authorities See the Plan Summary, for a listing of all authorities and references. D. Scope 1. Relationship with Other Plans This Plan, a component of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan and is primarily intended to serve as a stand-alone adverse weather response plan. Procedures within this plan address emergency response and short-term recovery. The City of San Luis Obispo Adverse Weather Plan is compatible with federal, county and state emergency response plans. Should this type of event come about as the result of another disaster, that Disaster Plan will supersede this Plan. 2. Jurisdictional Factors This plan encompasses the City of San Luis Obispo jurisdictional limits of the City of San Luis Obispo. Copies of this Plan have been sent to the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services, incorporated cities, San Luis Coastal Unified School District, and locally based federal, state and military institutions for informational and coordination purposes. City of San Luis Obispo Annex H Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan _ Adverse Weather ______________________________________________________________________________ For Official Use Only Page 16 of 16 E. Revision Page This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, revision title, page number revised date the revision was posted and the name of the person posting the revision. The format for numbering revisions shall be a sequential number followed by the last two digits of the current calendar year (e.g., #1-15, #2-15, and so on). New sequential numbers will begin each January 1. Revision # Revision Title Page Number Revised Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 8 Initiating and maintaining communication within and outside of the City may be difficult in a Disaster. The various communication systems available to the City and Emergency Operations Center are listed below. In an emergency a large volume of information must be accurately conveyed to specific individuals in a short period of time. This is called “messaging”. Messaging will occur within the Emergency Operations Center, as well as with other agencies and the San Luis Obispo County Operational Area Emergency Operations Center A. Communication Systems In a disaster, communication systems may be damaged or destroyed. Several methods are available and include: 1. Telephone Land-Lines The San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center has land-lines in its Emergency Operations Center. The numbers are: ADMINISTRATION/POLICY GROUP 805.781.7370 (prefix is 781 not 783) PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER 805.783.7788 EOC SAFETY AND SECURITY 805.783.7789 LEGAL 805.783.7787 LIAISON 805.783.7793 OPERATIONS 805.783.7791 FIRE BRANCH 805.783.7782 FIRE WORK AREA 805.783.7790 LAW ENFORCEMENT BRANCH 805.783.7784 LAW WORK AREA 805.783.7785 & 805.783.7786 PUBLIC WORKS BRANCH 805.783.7790 UTILITIES 805.783.7790 PLANNING/LOGISTICS WORK AREA 805.783.7795 & 805.783.7796 PLANS AND INTELLIGENCE 805.783.7792 LOGISTICS 805.783.7794 FINANCE 805.783.7799 INCIDENT COMMANDER 805.783.7797 City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 2 of 8 City of San Luis Obispo and County of San Luis Operational Area Emergency Operations Center Fax Numbers are: The Emergency Operations Center fax number is (805) 543.8019 The OA Emergency Operations Center fax number is (805) 781.4553 2. Cellular/Mobile Cellular phones may work during an emergency. The City maintains a list of cell phone numbers for vital personnel, which is confidential, request cell phone numbers from the Emergency Services Directory or the Deputy Emergency Services Director. Text messages should be transmitted when voice networks are overloaded. 3. Radio Communications Portable radios will be available in the Emergency Operations Center. 4. Amateur Radio Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) and Amateur Emergency Service (ARES) are Amateur Radio groups that consist of experienced volunteer radio communicators that have the ability to obtain a great deal of information for local government even when other communications systems are unavailable. These organizations can be contacted through the San Luis Obispo County Operational Area. ARES activation Protocol is in Section 5. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 3 of 8 5. E-mail Communications Procedures for using the City’s e-mail system are as follows. Documentation is a very important part of emergency response. Responders are the targets of litigation on a regular basis, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency will audit the reimbursement claims of state and local governments in the past. The rule of thumb in emergency response is, despite any verbal agreements or good intentions, if it’s not documented, then it did not happen. To avoid leaving the City and its responders open to audits and litigation, all e-mails sent through the City’s e-mail system will be automatically copied to the Documentation Unit. No exceptions! a. Failure of E-mail Service In case of a failure of the City’s e-mail system, the City will use a combination of telephones and radio systems. Documentation needs to continue, so each Emergency Operations Center staff member needs to keep notes (ICS Form 214) of all phone and radio communications. These notes need to include an accurate date and time, who sent and received the message, and the content of the message. These notes need to be collected and sent by runner to the Documentation Unit every hour. b. Web EOC – San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services c. RIMS The Response Information Management System (RIMS) is used by the San Luis County Operational Area, Southern Region and State Operations Centers to communicate. Information travels over the internet, however, it has a redundant satellite back-up. 6. Emergency Warning Systems Emergency information, advice, and action instructions are given to the public by various media. The Emergency Alert System (EAS), Community Emergency Notification System (Reverse 911) and social media are the primary media. Other available media are bulletins, handbills, and the press. The Public Information Officer maintains pre-scripted, hazard-specific warning messages for high impact events which require time sensitive warnings. a. REVERSE 9-1-1 The Reverse 9-1-1 System protocol is in Section 3. b. Emergency Alert System (EAS) The Emergency Alert System protocol is in Section 4. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 4 of 8 B. Messaging in the Emergency Operations Center Information and resource requests flowing into and out of the City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center must be properly tracked and recorded to ensure an effective emergency response. The following procedures apply to information coming into the Emergency Operations Center or being passed from one Emergency Operations Center position to another. Forms for use are attached at the end of this Section. All personnel shall keep a duty log (ICS 214) which records activities and information. 1. Messages/Information within the Emergency Operations Center: Information and resource requests passed from position to position within the Emergency Operations Center should be conveyed in electronic message or hard copy. If person-to-person or telephone is used, each person should note the conversation and its outcome in their duty log. a. Electronic Process The City uses Web EOC software to communicate with the San Luis Obispo County Operational Area Emergency Operations Center electronically during an Emergency/Event. All Emergency Operations Center staff should be trained in Web Emergency Operations Center communications and procedures. b. Hard Copy Processes If electronic communication is not possible hard copy forms will be used. The following information is crucial to include on internal Emergency Operations Center hard copy forms. i. Time and date must always be indicated. ii. Priority must be indicated: Immediate, High, and Routine. iii. Message initiator must indicate their Emergency Operations Center section and job function. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 5 of 8 2. Messages/Information to/from Outside the Emergency Operations Center Information entering and leaving the Emergency Operations Center must be properly documented. The following systems are available for recording and transmitting information. a. Electronic Process The use of the internet to communicate with the San Luis Obispo County Operational Area Emergency Operations Center will be possible through the Web EOC software. Not all staff will be able to communicate with the Operational Area Emergency Operations Center. The Primary use of Web EOC is to send situation/status reports to the San Luis County Operational Area Emergency Operations Center. b. Hard Copy Process If electronic communication is not possible hard copy forms will be used. The following information is crucial for Emergency Operations Center external messaging to function properly. i. Time and date must always be indicated ii. Priority must be indicated: Immediate, High, Routine iii. Messages coming from outside the E Emergency Operations Center will most likely be via telephone. Any Emergency Operations Center staff person transcribing the message must indicate their Emergency Operations Center Section as well as from where the message came. For instance, if Communications receives a message from the Incident Commander the message must read “FROM: Incident Commander VIA Communications”. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 6 of 8 City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Registration Form Position EOC Position Time In Time Out Signature City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 7 of 8 City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Message Form Emergency Operations Center Message Form Date: Time: Message Text Retain Original Copy PRIORITY High Immediate Routine To: Initial Message From: Emergency Operations Center Director Operations Plans Logistics Finance Other: Date/Time Sent: Reply Emergency Services Director Operations Plans Logistics Finance Other: Date/Time Sent: Disposition: File in Plans Message Thread City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Operations Center Communications and Messaging Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 8 of 8 An attempt should be made to fill all applicable resource information before sending to Logistics City San Luis Obispo – Emergency Operations Center Resource Request INCIDENT / ORDER NUMBER: LOGISTICS REQUEST NUMBER: Resource Requested: Priority: Critical/Life Safety Urgent Routine Incident Location: Incident Type: Resource Accepted By: Agency / Dept: Duration Needed: Phone: Staging/Delivery Location: Delivery Contact: Form Prepared By: EOC Position: Latest Acceptable Delivery: (Date / Time) Purpose / Use: Suggested Source(s): Approval by Section Coordinator Signature: Date: Time: Filled by Operations? Send to Logistics? FOR LOGISTICS USE ONLY Resource Ordered From: Vendor/Agency Address: Vendor/Agency Contact Person: Phone: Date Ordered: Time Ordered: Estimated Date/Time of Arrival: PO Number: Comments: Originator: Any EOC position. Retain Copy. Routing: Approval by Section Coordinator; forward to Logistics This form is used to request all resources for field use and for EOC use. Additional Notes: Top copy to receiver 2nd copy to receiver 3rd copy to originator 4th copy to plans City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Confidential Leadership Team Communications Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 1 Telephone numbers for Executive Team Members are confidential and not available for publication. Contact information is available from the City Manager, Assistant City Manager, Deputy City Manager or the Fire Chief on an as needed basis. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Reverse 911 Section 3 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 6 COUNTY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES AND INFORMATION REVERSE TELPHONIC NOTIFICATION SYSTEMS AUTHORIZED USE AND PROCEDURES FOR THE REVERSE 911 SYSTEM I. POLICY The Reverse 911 system will be utilized by the Sheriff’s Dispatch Center to create a message to be delivered to residents of San Luis Obispo County during critical incidents. The system is designed to blend geography with the 911 database in order to efficiently transmit messages to affected areas. II. PURPOSE To establish procedures for use of the Reverse 911 system by agencies in the County of San Luis Obispo and for Sheriff’s Department personnel who will be administering the program. III. COORDINATED USE: For Nuclear Power Plant Emergency use: The Reverse 911 system is one option that can be used for alert and notification following an emergency at Diablo Canyon Power Plant. The system can be used to supplement or provide backup to the primary systems which include the Early Warning System sirens and the Emergency Alert System. During a nuclear power plant emergency, any use of the Reverse 911 system will be coordinated and directed by the County EOC. Any usage of the Reverse 911 system by the County EOC that affects local cities or jurisdictions will be preceded with a Red Phone call or other form of notification to the affected jurisdiction’s EOC or dispatch. Messages broadcast during a nuclear power plant emergency will be drafted by the County Command Group or designee utilizing predrafted sample messages. The County Command Group, or designee will evaluate the situation and base calling priority on areas with urgent action required or areas with notification challenges. For Other Emergencies and Incidents: During incidents such as fires, floods, hazardous materials incidents where the County EOC is not activated or is acting as a resource to the affected city/jurisdiction, language should be drafted by the affected city. The Reverse 911 Request Form should be filled out in entirety and faxed or called in to the Sheriff’s Watch Commander. If the County EOC is activated, the EOC can assist with the creation and coordination of needed messages as appropriate. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Reverse 911 Section 3 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 2 of 6 If more than one city or jurisdiction is affected and have requested use of the system; priority of calls will be decided by the County Emergency Services Director or designee if the County EOC is activated. If the EOC is not activated, the Sheriff’s Watch Commander, with assistance by County OES as necessary will decide on the priority of requested calls. IV. ASSOCIATED COSTS All requested usage of the Reverse 911 system that can be implemented over standard T1 lines are covered by the Sheriff’s Department. If “Mass Calling” (higher volume calling) is necessary, fees may be billed to the requesting agency. V. AUTHORIZED USE The Reverse 911 system may be utilized for the following reasons: • A protective action such as evacuation or sheltering due to a natural or man-made disaster such as fire, flood, tsunami, nuclear power emergency, or chemical or biological incidents. • Incidents where protective action would reduce the likelihood of injury or death (i.e. hostage incident) • Incidents where a timely notification may result in the safe return of a missing child or adult. • In the event of a jail or prison escape to notify the public of the location of the escape and safety procedures they should take in the affected area. • Any other incident affecting public health or safety. All Reverse 911 notifications will be reviewed and approved by the Sheriff’s Watch Commander* prior to activation. *In a Nuclear Power Plant Emergency, once the EOC is activated the County Command Group or designee will review and approve the Reverse 911 message. The following people are authorized to request/release a Reverse 911 notification: • County Emergency Services Director • County Public Health Director or County Public Health Officer • A Sheriff’s Department supervisor or manager • Fire department Duty Chief or Incident Commander • Police department supervisor or manager • County Office of Emergency City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Reverse 911 Section 3 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 3 of 6 VI. Services PROCEDURE The Reverse 911 Emergency Notification Request Form must be completed for all Reverse 911 requests and include the following information: • The geographical area to be notified and reason for notification • A scripted message to the public which contains the following a. Reason for notification b. Date, Time, and issuing agency c. Type of action required d. Recommended evacuation route if applicable e. Shelter location if applicable f. Other information as relevant After an activation of the system and a resolution to the emergency, a termination notification may need to be broadcast to notify the affected area of the termination. The Reverse 911 database shall only be used for the intended purpose of emergency services and emergency notification. It shall not be used for marketing, advertising, public relations, or other commercial or no emergency purposes. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Reverse 911 Section 3 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 4 of 6 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY REVERSE 911 REQUEST CHECKLIST Determine whether it is appropriate to use Reverse 911 as opposed to other means of communication with the public. Reverse 911 is reserved for emergency notifications only. Please Check Applicable Notification Reason: An evacuation or sheltering order as a result of a natural or man-made disaster. Evacuation to reduce the likelihood of injury or death. Notification may result in the safe return of a missing child or adult. Jail, prison, or other relevant escape Other incident affecting public health or safety. Other: Please explain Complete the Reverse 911 Emergency Notification Request Form. Be sure to keep the message clear and concise. The length of the message will influence the time it takes to complete the calls. Call the Sheriff’s Watch Commander at 781-4553.  Identify yourself and state that you want to activate the REVERSE 911 system. Be prepared to positively identify yourself in order to prevent unauthorized use of the system. After verification of identity is complete, fax or e-mail the REVERSE 911 Reverse 911 Emergency Notification Request Form to 781-1234. If form cannot be sent or emailed, provide information over the phone. Sheriff’s Department personnel will then record the message and begin the notification calling session. Contact the Watch Commander to cancel the notification session if circumstances change and the notification is no longer necessary. See Request Form on Next Page REVERSE 911 EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION REQUEST FORM City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Reverse 911 Section 3 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 5 of 6 Call Sheriff Watch Commander at 781-4553 Fax Form to 781-1234 Requesting Agency: Notify businesses? Yes No Contact Name: Number of attempts per # 1 2 Contact Phone: Leave a message: If Yes is checked, message will be left rather than a second attempt Yes No Contact E-mail: Require acknowledgement? Caller can be asked to press a number to acknowledge Yes No ID/Badge #: Pre-defined list / Name: Your Title/Position/Rank Supervisor Name & Phone: Verbatim Message Text: Must include reason for notification, issuing agency, date & time, action required, and phone number to call for additional information. Should also include as applicable, evacuation route, shelter location, other relevant info. (Message will be recorded exactly as written) Geographic area to receive message: Include city, zip code, and street names if possible. Can also use parameters such as a 5 mile radius centered at a street or designated location. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Reverse 911 Section 3 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 6 of 6 This page intentional left blank. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Alerting System EAS Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 2 Activating the Emergency Alert System 1. EAS can be activated by a Chief Officer or Incident Commander. 2. Notify the Sheriff Watch Commander, 805.781.4533 or, San Luis Obispo County Emergency Communications Center, 805.543.4244. 3. If the incident is local, without Mutual Aid Assistance, a Public Information Officer is required. Emergency Message  Message cannot exceed one (1) minute, forty-five (45) seconds, (1:45) City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Emergency Alerting System EAS Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 2 of 2 General Warning (add or delete information as needed) Your attentions please your attention please. This is an Emergency Alert System Message. This is not a test; repeating, this is not a test. This message is for the public in the general area of: At approximately a.m. /p.m., a (type of emergency) occurred/ may occur at (location) This emergency involves (Describe the emergency including the threat to the public). The City of San Luis Obispo advises that residents/businesses/institutions with the boundaries of: Take the following actions: Additional Instructions/ information include: Listen to this station for further information, or call . At such time as the emergency situation changes or the emergency no longer exists, you will be promptly advised by another Emergency Alert message. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Services) Activation Process Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 1 Purpose: To provide guidance in activating ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Services) members for emergencies or other incidents. Cooperation and Coordination The San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services, the Director of Emergency Service or EOC Manager San Luis Obispo may attempt to activate ARES by phone, cell phone, or pager in accordance with the alerting roster provided by ARES, updated by ARES on an annual basis. San Luis Obispo Office of Emergency Services: 24/7 805.781.1144 City San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory City of San Luis Obispo Resources Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 1 Fire Department 1. Type 1 Engine a. Engine 1 Pierce 2000gpm BLS b. Engine 3 Pierce 2000gpm ALS c. Engine 4 Pierce 2000gpm ALS d. Engine 5 Pierce 2000gpm BLS 2. Type 2 Engine a. OES HME 1500gpm ALS 3. Type 3 Engine a. Engine 6 Weststates 500gpm BLS 4. Type 6 Patrol a. Patrol 1 Ford 125gpm BLS 5. Ladder Truck a. Truck 1 Pierce 100’ ALS b. Truck 2 Pierce 75’ ALS 6. Type 1 Ambulance a. Medic Rescue 1 Leader ALS 7. UTV a. UTV 1 Polaris 4x4 BLS 8. Technical Rescue a. TRT 1 Ford 4x4 9. Mechanic a. Mechanic 1 Ford 4X4 10. Staff Vehicles a. Battalion 1 Chevrolet 4x4 BLS b. DC 1 Chevrolet 4x4 BLS c. C-1 Toyota 4x4 BLS d. STEN Chevrolet 4x4 e. 426 Chevrolet 4x2 f. 427 Ford 4x4 g. Fire Marshal Chevrolet 4x2 City San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory City of San Luis Obispo Resources Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 2 of 4 h. Rav 1 Toyota 4x2 i. Rav 2 Toyota 4x2 j. 4Runner Toyota 4x4 Police Department 1. Patrol Vehicles a. Explorer Ford 4x2 b. Explorer Ford 4x2 c. Explorer Ford 4x2 d. Explorer Ford 4x2 e. Explorer Ford 4x2 f. Explorer Ford 4x2 g. Explorer Ford 4x2 h. Explorer Ford 4x2 i. Explorer Ford 4x2 j. Explorer Ford 4x2 k. Explorer Ford 4x2 l. Explorer Ford 4x2 m. Explorer Ford 4x2 n. Explorer Ford 4x2 o. Taurus Ford p. F-150 Ford 4x2 FST Truck 2. Traffic/Motorcycles a. ST 1300 Honda Motorcycle b. ST 1300 Honda Motorcycle c. ST 1300 Honda Motorcycle d. ST 1300 Honda Motorcycle e. ST 1300 Honda Motorcycle f. ST 1300 Honda Motorcycle g. ST 1300 Honda Motorcycle h. American Trailer Pace DUI Trailer 3. SWAT Vehicles a. F-550 Ford 4x4 Armored Truck b. F-350 Ford 4x4 Pulls SWAT Trailer c. America Trailer Pace Mobile Command Trailer d. Cargo Trailer Wells SWAT Equipment Trailer 4. Investigations Vehicles a. Explorer Ford 4x2 b. Explorer Ford 4x2 c. Taurus Ford City San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory City of San Luis Obispo Resources Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 3 of 4 d. Taurus Ford e. Taurus Ford f. Taurus Ford g. Taurus Ford h. Sienna Minivan Toyota i. Suburban Chevrolet 4x4 j. Ram 2500 Van Dodge Transport Van k. E-250 Van Ford Evidence Tech Van 5. Police Admin a. Taurus Ford b. Taurus Ford c. Taurus Ford d. Explorer Ford 4x2 e. Explorer Ford 4x2 Transit Unit ID City ID # Make Length Model Fuel 754 861 Gillig 30’ Low Floor Diesel 755 824 Gillig 30’ Low Floor Diesel 856 911 DOUBLE K 30’ TROLLEY Gasoline 857 912 Gillig 40’ Low Floor Diesel 858 913 Gillig 40’ Low Floor Diesel 859 914 Gillig 40’ Low Floor Diesel 860 915 Gillig 40’ Low Floor Diesel 861 916 Gillig 35’ Low Floor Diesel 862 917 Gillig 35’ Low Floor Diesel 963 1106 Dennis 40’ Deck Diesel 1264 1204 Gillig 40’ Low Floor Diesel 1365 1303 Gillig 40’ Low Floor Diesel 1366 1304 Gillig 40’ Low Floor Diesel 1167 1645 El Dorado 28’ Cut-Away Gasoline 1768 1726 GILLIG BRT 40’ Low Floor Diesel 1769 1727 GILLIG BRT 40’ Low Floor Diesel 1770 1728 GILLIG BRT 40’ Low Floor Diesel 1636 1636 Ford Service Truck Gasoline 1202 1202 Chrysler Town/count Gasoline CONFIDENTIAL For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services San Luis Obispo County RESOURCE DIRECTORY OF SELECTED PUBLIC AND PRIVATE AGENCIES REVISION 11 March 2015 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 1 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only COUNTYWIDE RESOURCE DIRECTORY - SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY Developed by the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of resources that may be needed in an emergency. This directory is intended to be used by County public safety and related agencies, although it may have practical application for all public safety and related entities/jurisdictions in San Luis Obispo County. Most of the resources can be obtained by using a commercial telephone book during business hours. However, it is sometimes difficult to contact private companies after hours. In addition to providing 24-hour numbers where possible, this directory also provides information on the types and number of resources available, and any additional relevant information. There are a number of small businesses throughout the county that are not listed because of the limited scope of this directory. It should be kept in mind that during large incidents, and many types of smaller incidents, an almost unlimited number of resources are available through the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services. Fire and Law Enforcement needs can be met through normal mutual aid channels. For any requests that cannot be filled through normal channels, Cal OES may be contacted through County OES. During non-business hours, County OES may be contacted through their Duty Line at 781-1144, or the Sheriff Watch Commander at 781- 4553. For routine State mutual aid information, Cal OES may be contacted at (562) 795-2900. Of course, each jurisdiction may wish to produce their own directory or augment this one with local resources. The listings in this directory are formatted similar to the commercial yellow pages, including an index at the beginning of the directory. Should any errors be noted in this directory, please contact County OES with the correct information. Please be aware that a number of the 24-hour phone numbers for small businesses are personal phone numbers at private homes. As a courtesy, please obtain permission from the appropriate company/agency prior to releasing numbers. County OES may be contacted at (805) 781-5011 or Room D-430, County Government Center, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 2 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES RESOURCE DIRECTORY DISTRIBUTION March 2015, Revision 11 JURISDICTION AGENCY / DEPT. CONTACT LOCATION Hard Copy CD COUNTY OES Each ESC and Admin Asst. BAGs 11 OES OES CD Binder, OES DOC 1 OES OES CD Binder, EOC 1 OES OES OES Veh #1709 1 EOC OES Ops, Command, OES, Logistics, Planning 5 1 JIC OES Office 1 Administrative Office CAO & ACAO BAGs 2 Communications Comm Manager Shop 1 1 Environmental Health Director Office, HAZ MAT Vehicle 2 2 County Fire Fire Chief Office 2 2 County Fire Dispatch 1 Health Health Officer CHO, CHADOC 2 3 Public Works Director Office / PW DOC 2 1 Sheriff Watch Commander W/C Emergency Plans Binder 1 Sheriff Sheriff and Undersheriff Sheriff's Admin 2 Sheriff Dispatch 1 Five Cities Fire Authority Fire Dept. Fire Chief and Dispatch Headquarters/AG Station 2 2 City of Arroyo Grande Police Dept. Police Chief and Dispatch Office 2 1 City of Grover Beach Police Dept. Police Chief EOC 1 City of Atascadero Fire Dept. Fire Chief Station 1 1 Police Dept. Police Chief Office 1 City of Morro Bay Fire Dept. Fire Chief EOC 1 Police Dept. Police Chief Office 1 City of Paso Robles Fire Dept. Fire Chief EOC 1 Police Dept. Police Chief Office 1 City of Pismo Beach Fire Dept. Battalion Chief Office 1 Police Dept. Police Chief EOC 1 City of San Luis Obispo Fire Dept. Fire Chief EOC 1 Police Dept. Police Chief Office 1 City PSAPS 7 Cambria Fire Dept. Fire Chief Fire Hall 1 Cayucos Fire Dept. Fire Chief Office 1 San Miguel Fire Dept. Fire Chief District Headquarters 1 Santa Margarita Fire Dept. Fire Chief Station 1 Templeton Fire Dept. Fire Chief Station 1 American Red Cross Disaster Services Executive Director Office 1 Cal Poly Administration Associate VP EOC 1 CHP Dispatch 1 CMC Watch Office EOC/Watch Office 1 SLO COE Operational Services Director Operational Services/ Safety Coordinator Office 1 TOTALS 36 45 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 3 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Index AIRCRAFT, Medical-Fixed Wing ..................................................................................... 6 AIRCRAFT, Non-Medical, Fixed Wing and Rotary Wing ................................................. 6 AMBULANCES ............................................................................................................... 7 BACKHOES .................................................................................................................... 7 BARRICADES ................................................................................................................. 7 BOATS ............................................................................................................................ 8 BULLDOZERS ................................................................................................................ 9 CHAINSAWS .................................................................................................................. 9 COMMUNICATIONS, FAX Machines............................................................................ 10 COMMUNICATIONS, General ...................................................................................... 10 COMMUNICATIONS, Radios ........................................................................................ 10 COMMUNICATIONS, Runners ..................................................................................... 11 COMMUNICATIONS, Telephones, Cellular .................................................................. 12 COMMUNICATIONS, Telephones, Hardwire ................................................................ 13 COMMUNICATIONS, Vehicles ..................................................................................... 13 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, Construction Companies .......................................... 14 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, Rental ....................................................................... 16 EMERGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES, Basic ................................................................. 18 FACILITIES ................................................................................................................... 18 FOOD, Caterers ............................................................................................................ 19 FOOD, Field Kitchens ................................................................................................... 20 FOOD, Grocers ............................................................................................................. 22 FOOD, Water ................................................................................................................ 23 FUEL, Diesel, Commercial Stations .............................................................................. 24 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 4 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only FUEL, Wholesale Distributors and Trucks ..................................................................... 25 GENERATORS ............................................................................................................. 25 HAND CREWS .............................................................................................................. 27 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, CONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIES .................................. 27 HOSPITALS .................................................................................................................. 29 LANGUAGE SERVICES ............................................................................................... 30 LAUNDRY ..................................................................................................................... 30 LOADERS ..................................................................................................................... 31 MEDICAL CLINICS ....................................................................................................... 31 PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES, Local ............................................................................ 32 PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES, State............................................................................. 35 PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES, Federal ......................................................................... 37 PUBLIC WORKS AGENCIES ....................................................................................... 37 PUMPS ......................................................................................................................... 39 RAILROAD .................................................................................................................... 40 SAND AND GRAVEL .................................................................................................... 40 SANDBAGS .................................................................................................................. 41 SANDBAGS, Retail Sources ......................................................................................... 41 SANDBAGS, Out of County Bulk Sources .................................................................... 42 SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL DISTRICTS ........................................................................ 43 SEARCH AND RESCUE ............................................................................................... 45 SECURITY GUARD COMPANIES, Private ................................................................... 45 SELF CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS FILL STATIONS ................................ 46 SHOWERS, Portable .................................................................................................... 46 TENTS AND PARTY RENTALS.................................................................................... 47 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 5 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only TOILETS, PORTABLE .................................................................................................. 48 TOOLS, Other Sources ................................................................................................. 50 TOW SERVICES, CHP SLO area ................................................................................. 50 TOW SERVICES, CHP Templeton area ....................................................................... 51 TRAFFIC CONTROL EQUIPMENT .............................................................................. 53 TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................................... 54 TRANSPORTATION, RAILROAD ................................................................................. 54 UTILITIES, Pipelines ..................................................................................................... 54 UTILITIES, Public .......................................................................................................... 55 UTILITIES, Sewer ......................................................................................................... 56 VEHICLES .................................................................................................................... 57 BUSES, Charter ............................................................................................................ 57 BUSES, Regional and City Transit ................................................................................ 57 BUSES, School ............................................................................................................. 58 VEHICLES, Car Rentals................................................................................................ 59 VOLUNTEER SERVICES ............................................................................................. 60 WATER ......................................................................................................................... 65 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 6 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only AIRCRAFT, Medical-Fixed Wing For medical helicopters contact MEDCOM (781-4563), UNLESS COUNTY EOC IS ACTIVATED. If County EOC is activated, make requests through the EOC. Name ANGEL FLIGHT WEST Contact Jim Weaver Address 3161 Donald Douglas Loop South, Santa Monica, CA 93532 Phone (310) 398- 6123 24-Hour Phone: Same as business (night service will answer) Web URL www.angelflightwest.org or angelflight.org Information Angel Flight will transport ambulatory patients that are not in need of constant medical care (with 3-5 day notice on patients). They will also transport equipment, supplies, and people required for an emergency. They will fly up to 1,000 miles one way. This is a nationwide organization with access to numerous fixed wing aircraft. Name CALSTAR – 7th Service Area Address 3996 Mitchell Rd, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone (805) 938-9038; 24-Hour Phone: (800) 252-5050 FAX: (805) 938-9022 Web URL www.calstar.org E-mail info@calstar.org Information CALSTAR operates an EC 135 helicopter with 150 mile range and can carry one (1) patient and field versions of the same medical equipment found in most emergency rooms. AIRCRAFT, Non-Medical, Fixed Wing and Rotary Wing Sheriff's aero squadron aircraft (helicopters and fixed wing) are available through the Sheriff's Office Watch Commander, (805) 781-4553. Name AIR SAN LUIS Address San Luis Obispo County Airport, 785 Airport Dr., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 541-1038; 24-Hour Phone: (805) 541-1038 Web URL www.airsanluis.com E-mail al@airsanluis.com Information Maintenance facility only Name CAL FIRE AIR PROGRAM Address Phone Request through ECC, 24 hour emergency 543-4242 Web URL www.calfire.ca.gov E-mail SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 7 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Information Airtankers: 23 Helicopters: 11 Air-tactical Aircraft: 14 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 8 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CHP AIR OPERATIONS Address 4115 Broad Street, #B-10 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone Request through CHP, dispatch 593-3344 Web URL E-mail Information A fixed wing aircraft used for speed enforcement and a helicopter used for search and rescue missions are housed at Paso Robles Airport Name DEL RIO AVIATION Address 5062 Wing Way, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 238-0800; No 24-hour number. Information Maintenance facility only AMBULANCES For emergency or immediate needs, contact MedCom at (805) 781-4563. (This is not a public number, and should be used by public safety or related agencies only.) Name CAMBRIA COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE DISTRICT Address 2535 Main St, Cambria, CA 93428 Phone (805) 927-8304 Web URL www.cambria-healthcare.org Name SAN LUIS AMBULANCE Address 3546 South Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone San Luis Obispo (805) 543-26 26; Paso Robles (805) 238-2622; Templeton (805) 599-0468; Atascadero (805) 599-0470; Morro Bay (805) 599-0469; Arroyo Grande (805) 599-0475; Nipomo (805) 599-0477. FAX: (805) 546-0885 Web URL www.sanluisambulance.com BACKHOES See Construction Equipment. BARRICADES See Traffic Control Equipment. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 9 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only BOATS Name CAL FIRE / COUNTY FIRE Address 635 North Santa Rosa Street, San Luis Obispo. CA 93405 Phone (805) 544-5105; 24-Hour Emergency: (805) 543-4242 Information County Fire has an Avon Boat with a motor based at the San Luis Obispo Airport Station. This boat travels with County Fire Heavy Rescue 21 and is available for County wide response. County Fire also has larger boats available based at Oak Shores and Heritage Ranch with fire pump capabilities. These boats are available for use on Nacimiento Lake. Name COAST GUARD Address 1279 Embarcadero, Morro Bay, CA 93443-1319 Phone (805) 772-2167; 24-hour: LA/Long Beach - (562) 980-4444; Emergency - 800- 221- 8724 FAX (805) 772-9100 Information 2 Motor life boats 47’ length (surf boats), 1 response boat small generation II, trailer-able 29’ length. All assets are located at CG Station Morro Bay and are for all ocean response needs. Name LAKE NACIMIENTO RESORT AND MARINA Address 10625 Nacimiento Lake Drive, Bradley, CA 93426 Phone Resort:(805) 238-3256; Marina:(805) 238-1056 or (805) 238-0786 Web URL www.nacimientoresort.com E-mail res@nacimientoresort.com Information Lake Nacimiento Marina has two 18’ 4 person open bow ski boats, six 21’ open bow ski boats, three 21’ pontoon boats, three 24’ pontoon boats and three 15’ aluminum fishing boats. Can request additional boats from offsite location. Name LOPEZ LAKE MARINA Address / Phones 6820 Lopez Drive (Store): (805) 489-1006 (private vendor) 6800 Lopez Drive (Lake): (805) 788-2381 (computerized - county parks number, to reach staff press #4) Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 24-hour: 489-1006 Web URL www.lopezlakemarina.com Information Lopez: eleven (11) 14' small aluminum boats with six horsepower motors, two (2) 24’ patio boats with eight horsepower motors, one 24’ Tri-toon (pontoon boat) with a nine horsepower motor, one (1) 24’ pontoon boat with 115 horsepower motor, one (1) 26’ Tri-toon boat with 115 horsepower motor, one (1) 20’ ski boat and three (3) jet skis. Name NORTH COAST OCEAN RESCUE Information Inflatable – Contact via Cambria Fire Department: (805) 927-6240 or Cal Fire/Co Fire: (805) 543-4242 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 10 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE Address 1585 Kansas Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 781-4550; 24-Hour: Same. Information The Sheriff’s Office has one 22’ inflatable boat, one 25’ Aluminum hull and two larger jet ski type boats. Name SANTA MARGARITA LAKE (County of San Luis Obispo) Address 4695 Santa Margarita Lake Road, West Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, CA 93453 Phone (805) 788-2397; (805) 781-5200 (General Services) Web URL www.slocountyparks.org Information Santa Margarita Lake has two (2) medium aluminum boats in dry storage, and also a fiberglass medium boat in water. Boats are rotated in & out of water. BULLDOZERS See Construction Equipment. CHAINSAWS Name NOBLE OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT Address 2935 South Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 2280 S. Meredith, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 541-6090; FAX: (805) 541-3784 Santa Maria: (805) 349-1300; FAX: (805) 349-1334 24-hour, Tim Peterson: (805) 544- 8458 (cell) or (805) 440-9900 (home) Web URL www.noblesaw.com E-mail tim@noblesaw.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 11 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only COMMUNICATIONS, FAX Machines Name CHAPARRAL BUSINESS MACHINES, INC. Address 825 Riverside Dr. #6, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 239-3555 (805) 541-5200 (SLO) (805) 922-4515 (Santa Maria) Web URL www.cbmachines.com Name ULTREX BUSINESS PRODUCTS Address 712 Fiero Lane, #33, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 735 State St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Phone (805) 783-1234 (SLO) (805) 962-1234 (Santa Barbara) 24-hour (877) 503-8755 Web URL www.ultrex.net COMMUNICATIONS, General Name John Whitford Communications Address 7575 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 461-3030; 1-866-461-3030 FAX: (805) 461-8848 24hr: John Whitford (805) 610-4982 Web URL www.johnwhitford.com E-mail sales@johnwhitford.com Information JWC participates in the Satellite Community Aid Relief Efforts program (Satellite CARES) program. Satellite CARES partners with the IT Disaster Resource Center to deploy technical resources and emergency communications. Provides Satellite, phone, network, TV connectivity. Has mobile trailer or portable Skid mount unit. Satellite phones COMMUNI CATIONS, Radios Cal OES: Cal OES has a cache of portable radios and command vehicles which are available through County OES. Call County OES at (805) 781-5011 during business hours. After hours, contact County OES through the Duty Line (805) 781-1144, Sheriff's Office at (805) 781-4553 or (805) 781-4550. For routine information, contact the State Office of Emergency Services at (562) 795-2900. COUNTY OES: Has a variety of radio resources, including multiple caches of portables on law, med, fire, public works and OES frequencies, as well as portable base stations and repeaters. Contact County OES at numbers above. COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPT.: Has self-propelled and trailer command / communications vehicles with radios on all public safety frequencies. See listing under Communications Resources, Vehicles. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 12 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only CAL FIRE / COUNTY FIRE: Has a cache of fire frequency portables. Business hours: (805) 543-4244; 24-hour Emergency: (805) 543-4242. (CAL FIRE/County Fire may also be contacted on County Fire Radio Net by those with that capability.) Name RADIO AMATEUR CIVIL EMERGENCY SERVICE(RACES) Phone Contact County Communications at 781-5129. For emergencies after hours, contact duty County OES Coordinator at (805) 781-1144. Information ARES/RACES provides excellent alternate communications services for agencies during emergencies. RACES is an integral part of the County's emergency response system and regularly works with CAL FIRE/County Fire on large incidents. COMMUNICATIONS, Runners Name CALIFORNIA CONSERVATION CORP Address P.O. Box 1380, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 549-3561; 24-hour: to request CCC for emergency use, contact County OES at (805) 781-5011 during business hours or the Sheriff's Office after hours, at (805) 781-4553 Web URL http://www.ccc.ca.gov/EMERGNCY/emergncy.htm Information The California Conservation Corp has personnel that may be used as runners for on-site communications or for site to site communications using vehicles. CCC Central Coast District fields three to four 12-15 person crews at the base camp in San Luis Obispo and two crews in Santa Maria. Normal work week hours of the crews may not be charged to the requesting agency, however overtime and any required food and lodging (if crews are working beyond commute range from their base center) will be. or 781-4550. Provide the following information: Nature of problem; approximate number of personnel needed; approximate time frame; and why the CCC resources are needed. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 13 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only COMMUNICATIONS, Telephones, Cellular Name AT&T WIRELESS Address 11998 Los Osos Valley Rd., San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 546-6400, press 2 for local store 24 Hour Emergency (707) 336-2497 Web URL att.com Information Call the 24 Hour emergency line to dispatch emergency services. Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES Address County Government Center, Room D-430, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 Phone (805) 781-5011 (after hours contact Sheriff’s Watch Commander 781- 4553); Duty Line: 781-1144 Information For COWs or cellular emergency resources. Name SPRINT AUTHORIZED DEALERS Address 1506 Froom Ranch Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 2210 S. Bradley Rd., STE D4, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 439-2660/2662 Santa Maria: (805) 739-2288 Emergency Response Team: (888) 639-0020 Govt Emergency Telecommunications Services (GETS): (254) 295-2220 Web URL sprint.com Information For dispatch of cellular emergency services contact the Emergency Response Team. Name VERIZON WIRELESS Address 994 Mill Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 549-6260 Press #3 for local store Emergency Line: (800) 922-0204 Web URL verizonwireless.com Information Call the Emergency line to dispatch COWs or other cellular emergency services. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 14 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only COMMUNICATIONS, Telephones, Hardwire Name AT&T Address 196 Suburban Road (P.O. Box 8111), San Luis Obispo, CA 93403-8111 Phone Network Operations Center: (800) 662-0266 Emergency Control Center: (916) 977-7777 Central Control Office /Network Reliability Center: (916) 977-7582, Repair Service (Emergency Response Agencies Only): (800) 332-1321, (800) 275-0014; (800) 310-2355 Engineering: Neil Zakaria: (W) (805) 546-7012; (C) (805) 704-3813 Engineering Supervisor: David Whitehead (805) 546-7389 Web URL www.att.com Information AT&T has installed a special phone line/number at the EOC to coordinate and expedite ordering of emergency phones and phone lines by all agencies and jurisdictions in times of emergency. This number is operational when the County EOC is activated (and staffed by AT&T). COMMUNICATIONS, Vehicles Name CALOES MOBILE INTEROPERABILITY GATEWAY UNIT (MIGU) Address County Communications Shop Phone Request through County Communications Shop at (805) 781-5129 or off hours through County Sheriff’s Watch Commander. Information Provides on-scene communications interoperability between disparate radio systems. Name COUNTY FIRE COMMUNICATIONS UNIT Phone Request through County Fire ECC, 543-4242 Information Provides on-scene radio communications. Name REZEK EQUIPMENT Address 970 Reece St., San Bernardino, CA 92411 Phone (800) 739-3979 FAX: (800) 739-3920 24 hr.: (909) 888-3008; Cell: (951) 236-6444 (Ron) Web URL www.rezekequipment.com E-mail rrr@ronrezek.com Information Rezek has communication trailers, command trailers. (They also have a large variety of other equipment, such lighting and generators, and semi- trucks set up as field kitchens, capable of serving 3000 meals. Adding Portable sink and shower unit trailers to their fleet.) Also under: Food, Field Kitchen, Showers, Portable; SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 15 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES Address County Government Center, Room D-430, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 Phone (805) 781-5011 (after hours contact Sheriff’s Watch Commander 781- 4553); Duty Line: 781-1144 Information OES has a UHF & VHF portable repeater system, one each UHF and VHF portable base stations, and a cache of UHF and VHF portable radios. Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT Address P.O. Box 32, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 781-4550 (is 24-hour number also) Information The Sheriff’s Office has a Command Communication Van and Trailers that have a variety of communications resources. In addition, the Search and Rescue Unit has Support and Crew Trailers. CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, Construction Companies Name A-JAY EXCAVATING Address 8315 Morro Road, STE 102, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 466-0300 24-hour Phone: (805) 434-2140 (John) Web URL www.a-jay.com E-mail patricks@a-jay.com Name ASSOCIATED PACIFIC, INC. Address 495 Embarcadero, Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone (805) 772-7472, FAX: (805) 772-5803 24-hour: Mike Marchitto cell (805) 234-2841 and Paul Gillen, Owner cell (805) 234-5055 Web URL www.associatedpacific.com E-mail rludwig@associatedpacific.com Name R. BAKER INC Address P.O. Box 419 Arroyo Grande, CA 93421 Phone (805) 489-8711 24-hour phone: Mr. Jim Guiton home: (805) 489-8241 cell: (805) 440-6929 E-mail jimguiton@charter.net Name BEECHAM CONSTRUCTION (C. BEECHAM CORPORATION) Address 3030 Clark Valley Road, Los Osos, CA 93402 Phone (805) 528-7367; (805) 534-9457 24-hour: Craig Beecham, Owner:(805) 528-5236-home (805)459-5582-cell Name BOB’S CRANE SERVICE Address P.O. Box 43 Santa Margarita, CA 93453 14376 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 544-5511; FAX: (805) 466-5749 24-hour: Randy cell (805) 441-5000 E-mail bobscrane@charter.net SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 16 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name BP GENERAL ENGINEERING & ED’S EXCAVATING Address P.O. Box 6973 (2056 Mountain View Drive), Los Osos, CA 93402 Phone (805) 528-0882 After Hours: (805) 441-3932 (Brad) E-mail dirtpushin@sbcglobal.net Name BULLARD & SONS CONSTRUCTION Address P.O. Box 540 (3738 La Cruz Way), Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-1414; cell (Don): (805) 471- 0647 Information Have: 3 yard excavator, 5-yd. Cat loader, water trucks, compacting equipment, and motor grater. Name R. BURKE CORPORATION Address P.O. Box 957/ 865 Capitolio Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 543-8568; FAX: (805) 543-2521 24-hour: Rob Burke: (805) 431-0647 cell; (805) 543-3209 (home) Web URL www.rburkecorporation.com E-mail rbc@rburkecorporation.com Name ECCO EQUIPMENT CORPORATION Address 1047 N Kelsey Street, Visalia, CA 93291 1417 N. Susan Street, Santa Ana, CA 92703 – Corporate office Phone Visalia: (800) 729-3226 Santa Ana:(714) 554-4851 24-hour: (559) 804-6115, Dennis Umholz Web URL www.eccoequipment.com E-mail dennisu@eccoequipment.com Name GF GARCIA AND SONS Address 123 Park Avenue, Cayucos, CA 93430 Phone (805) 995-3548, FAX: (805) 995-1895 24-hour: Zack Mead: (805) 995-0162 home, (805) 801-3474 cell E-mail gfgsi@att.net Name GRAINGER INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY Address Nearest branch: 101 S. Rice Avenue, Oxnard, CA 93030 Phone (805) 201-3800; FAX: (805) 201-3804 Corp. Customer Care: (800) 755-2021 Web URL www.grainger.com Information Grainger is also listed under “GENERATORS and TOOLS, Other Sources.” Grainger has construction equipment, generators, pumps, and tools. Name NEGRANTI CONSTRUCTION Address 1424 Old Creek Road (P.O. Box 198), Cayucos, CA 93430 Phone (805) 995-3357; FAX: 995-3281 24-hour: (805) 995-2011, Jon Negranti E-mail negranti.construction@gmail.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 17 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name ROSS CONSTRUCTION, INC. Address 1102 Pike Ln, Oceano, CA 93445 Phone (805) 473-8005 FAX: (805) 473-8006 24-hour: Michael Ross (805) 481-2550 E-mail mross@mjross.net Name SANSONE COMPANY Address 354 Pacific St #210, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Mailing: PO Box 1429, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406-1429 Phone (805) 549-0667, FAX: (805) 549-0702 24 hour: David Sansone, cell: (805) 215-9547 Web URL www.sansoneco.com E-mail elaine@sansoneco.com Name T. SIMONS COMPANY INC. Address 230 W. Tefft Street, Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 929-0700; FAX: (805) 929-0702 24-hour: Tammy Simons, Owner & President cell: (805) 714- 0422 Web URL www.tsimonsinc.com E-mail tsimons@tsimonsinc.com Name WALTER BROTHERS CONSTRUCTION Address 3220 South Higuera, STE 302 ,San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Mailing: P.O. Box 809, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 543-5854, FAX: (805) 543-6807 24-hour: Don Walter:(805) 543-5854; or (805) 543-2252(home) Web URL www.walterbros.com E-mail don@walterbros.com Information Has water truck, backhoe, and Skip and Drag loader CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, Rental Name AGGREKO Phone(s) 24/7 National Support Center, for emergencies: (877) 603-6021; Calls routed to area locations in: Santa Fe Springs, San Francisco, Las Vegas NV, Phoenix AZ. Web URL www.aggreko.com Information Rentals of Generators, Air Conditioners, Heaters, Dehumidifiers and Chillers. Aggreko is also listed under “GENERATORS”. Name COASTAL RENTAL Address 8900 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 466-5566, FAX: (805) 466-4334 Web URL www.facebook.com/coastalrentalequipment E-mail coastalrental@att.net Information Coastal Rental Centers has a wide selection of equipment including generators, pumps, all type of power tools, front end loaders and numerous other miscellaneous tools. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 18 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name GROVER TOOL RENTAL Address 1211 West Grand Avenue, Grover Beach, CA 93433 Phone (805) 481-2184 Web URL www.grovertoolrental.com Information Pumps, generators, concrete saws, jacks, porta cranes, skip loaders, pullers, air compressors, and misc. other items. Name NOBLE OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT Address 2935 South Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 2280 S. Meredith, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 541-6090; FAX: (805) 541-3784 Santa Maria: (805) 349-1300; FAX: (805) 349-1334 24-hour, Tim Peterson: (805) 544- 8458 or (805) 440-9900 Web URL www.noblesaw.com E-mail tim@noblesaw.com Information Chainsaws, generators and water pumps. Name OASIS EQUIPMENT RENTAL (AKA CAMBRIA ELECTRIC) Address 2415 Village Lane Unit E, Cambria, CA 93428; (805) 927-5511 540 Atascadero Road, Morro Bay, CA; (805) 772-3335 2101 9th Street, Los Osos, CA; (805) 528-3335; (805) 528-8529 Phone 24-hour for Morro Bay: Owner Paul: (805) 466-8515; or Owner Darren (805) 431-2325 Information Forklifts, scissor lifts, air compressors, tractors, pumps, generators, lawn & garden equipment, trailers, traffic safety and compaction equipment. Name QUINN RENTAL Addresses / Phone(s) 1560 Ramada Drive, Paso Robles, CA 93446; (805) 237-7700 1655 Carlotti Dr, Santa Maria, CA, (805) 925-8611 830 W. Betteravia, Santa Maria, CA; (805) 922-3529 24hr: Leave a message at any location and contact will return the call Web URL qrs-cat.com or quinncompany.com Information Trucks, trailers, trenchers, dozers, loaders, graders, generators, welders, compressors, pumps, concrete equipment and misc. other related items. Name SAN LUIS POWERHOUSE Address 798 Francis Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone 24-hours: (805) 543-4643, Russ Kimmel, Owner Web URL www.sanluispowerhouse.com E-mail gens@sanluispowerhouse.com Information Portable Generators; Larger “permanent” can be ordered (not installed) Name UNITED RENTAL Address 635 Tank Farm Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 543-7297; 24-hour: same, or (805) 431-0322, Tim Haveman; (805) 431-0440, Matthew Tackett Web URL www.ur.com or www.unitedrentals.com Information United has back hoes, skip loaders, dozers, dump trucks, forklift, grader, trenchers, pumps, generators, Bob Cats, water trucks, emergency supplies, and other related equipment. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 19 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only EMERGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES, Basic Name AIRGAS WEST Address 205 Tank Farm Rd, San Luis Obispo, 93401; 2131 Golden Hill Rd, Paso Robles, 93440 Phone SLO office: (805) 544-4433, FAX: (805) 544-0954; Paso office: (805) 237- 4007, FAX (805) 237-4049 Web URL www.airgas.com Information Medical equipment, regulators, supplies. Name APRIA HEALTH CARE Address 705 Fiero Ln. Suite 10, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone 24hr Call Center: (805) 783- 7412 or (800) 900-0305; FAX: (805) 543- 2865; 24 hour FAX: (855) 252-9187 Web URL www.apria.com E-mail paula_conner@apria.com – SLO Branch Manager Information Oxygen treatment, respiratory, durable equipment. Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY FIRE DEPT. Address 635 North Santa Rosa Street, San Luis Obispo ,CA 93405 Phone General Info: (805) 543-4244; Fire Prevention: (805) 543-2446; Burn Day Info: (800) 834-2876; 24-hour Emergency: (805) 543-4242 FAX (805) 543-4248 Information Has a heavy rescue unit (based at SLO Airport) with BLS supplies for about 30 people. FACILITIES Community Centers/Meeting areas and capacity Name CAYUCOS VETERANS’ HALL Address 10 Cayucos Drive, Cayucos, CA 93430 Phone (805) 995-2401 Web URL www.cayucosvetshall.org/ Information Main 47’ x 58’ multi-purpose room – 200 people dining 14’ x 24’ stage with theater curtains in main room 15’ x 20’ second multi-purpose room – 20 people Complete commercial kitchen Name COLONY PARK COMMUNITY CENTER Address 5599 Traffic Way, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 470-3360 Web URL http://www.atascadero.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&c atid=2&id=559 Information Gymnasium: 500 banquet; 1000 standing Conference Room: 24 Arts & Crafts Room: 39 Dance Room & Exercise Room: 25 in each Teen Center: 20 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 20 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name MORRO BAY VETERANS’ MEMORIAL BUILDING Address 209 Surf Street, Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone Morro Bay Rec and Parks Department (805) 772-6278; FAX: 772-2693 Web URL http://www.morro-bay.ca.us/index.aspx?NID=346 Information Combining the Meeting Room with the Assembly Hall, the Veterans’ Memorial Building has 3,190 square feet with theater seating for 370 people and dining for 195 people. Also has kitchen area Name PISMO BEACH VETERANS’ MEMORIAL HALL Address 780 Bello Street, Pismo Beach, CA 93449 Phone City of Pismo Beach (805) 773-4657 Web URL http://www.pismobeach.org/index.aspx?NID=100 Information 600 Auditorium Seating 280 Dining Name SHELL BEACH VETERANS’ MEMORIAL HALL Address 230 Leeward, Pismo Beach, CA 93449 Phone City of Pismo Beach (805) 773-4657 Web URL http://www.pismobeach.org/index.aspx?NID=100 Information 60 Auditorium Seating 90 Dining FOOD, Caterers Name AMERICAN RED CROSS Address 225 Prado Road, Suite A, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 543-0696, FAX (805) 544-1921 Web URL www.redcross.org/ca/san-luis-obispo Information The Red Cross can provide on-site food to approximately 100 people. They can also provide or arrange for subsistence to an unlimited of people staying in their shelters. Name GUS’s GROCERY Address 1638 Osos, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 543-8684; 24hr: Same Web URL www.facebook.com/gussgrocery Name RAYMOND CATTANEO BBQ SERVICE Address 6255 Edna Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 541-6447 (also 24-hour) or toll free 1(866) 729-7728. FAX: (805) 541-6526, Contact: Raymond or Nina-Marie Web URL www.raysownbrand.com/bbq-service E-mail info@raysownbrand.com Information Raymond Cattaneo BBQ Service can feed an almost unlimited number of people once the proper supplies and food have been obtained. Cattaneo has experience serving up to 5,000 people. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 21 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name THE RIB LINE Address 12308 Los Osos Valley Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 228 W. Grand Avenue, Grover Beach, CA 93433 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 543-7427 Grover Beach: (805) 474-0123 Catering: (805) 602-2108 , Krystal 24 hour: Tony Gordon, Owner: (805) 782-0786 home, (805) 550-5467 cell Web URL www.ribline.com E-mail theribline@gmail.com Information Per their website, The Rib Line can handle 30 to 1000 people. Also have contract in place with CAL FIRE. Name SALVATION ARMY Address 815 Islay Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone Main Office: (805) 544-2401, Beth, Field Rep; Office: (805) 238-9591, 24 hour: (805) 462-4624 Information The Salvation Army can provide on-site food to approximately 100 people. They can also provide or arrange for subsistence to an unlimited number of people staying in their shelters. FOOD, Field Kitchens Name A-1 WATER Address 567 Carlo Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 Mailing: P.O. Box 1552, Goleta, CA 93116-1552 Phone (805) 685-5000, FAX: (805) 683-2361 24-hour: Dale Elevatorski, owner (805) 680-0372 cell or Kat Donlan (805) 705-0129 Web URL www.a1water.net E-mail dale@a1water.net Information Mobile Kitchen Support trailer with dishwasher, sinks, water heater, drying racks Also listed under Food and Beverages, Water; Laundry and Showers. Name BLAGG’S FOOD SERVICE Address 21885 State Highway 299 E., Bella Vista, CA 96008 Phone (530) 549-5522 or (800) 655-7479 FAX: (530) 344-7875 24 hour: (800) 201-2433 - Dispatch Web URL www.blaggsfoodservice.com Information Blagg’s Food Service has a Primary Kitchen Trailer, Prep Trailer/Secondary Cooking Trailer, Refrigerated Salad & Dessert Trailer, Full Service Beverage Trailer, Sanitation Units, Hand Washing Units, Certified Potable Water Units, Sleeper Trailers w/Heating & AC, Tractor Trucks, Generators, Tents, tables, and seating Also own AAA Mobile Showers. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 22 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name BOW VALLEY AGRI-LAND SERVICES Address 14500 El Camino Atascadero, CA 93422 Mailing: 69850 Parkfield-Coalinga Rd., San Miguel, CA 93451 Phone (805) 466-1468 24-hour: same or (805) 391- 0105-John Information Bow Valley has 6000 gallon tankers (potable water) A 45' refrigerator with generator and lights, a prep trailer and 100kw generator Name CAL FIRE Address 635 North Santa Rosa Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 543-4244; 24-hour phone: (805) 543-4242. (County Fire Radio Net may be used for contact by agencies with that capability.) Information CAL FIRE has one field kitchen available from the CAL FIRE Crew Camp at Cuesta Camp locally and additional units from various locations statewide. Field kitchens are not a mutual aid item and requesting agency will be charged applicable expenses and cost (both personnel and supplies). Approximately 1,000 to 1,200 people may be fed by the Cuesta Kitchen Crew. Name EL DORADO WATER AND SHOWER SERVICES, INC. Address Po Box 944 (582 Mother Lode Drive) Placerville, CA 95667 Phone (888) 622-8995; FAX: (530) 622-0153; Rodger (530) 622-1067 During office hours, 24-hour: (530) 622-8995 Web URL www.eldoradowaterandshower.com E-mail eldorwater@comcast.net Information Mobile showers, hand wash stations, mobile laundries, mobile kitchen support, gray water trucks, potable water trucks tents and incident base camp packages. Expect long wait time on phone Also listed in Laundry and Food, Field Kitchens. Name REZEK EQUIPMENT Address 970 Reece St., San Bernardino, CA 92411 Phone (800) 739-3979 FAX: (800) 739-3920 24 hr.: (909) 888-3008; Cell: (951) 236-6444 (Ron) Web URL www.rezekequipment.com E-mail rrr@ronrezek.com Information Rezek has communication trailers, command trailers. (They also have a large variety of other equipment, such lighting and generators, and semi- trucks set up as field kitchens, capable of serving 3000 meals. Adding Portable sink and shower unit trailers to their fleet.) Also under: Communications, Vehicles; Showers, Portable; SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 23 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only FOOD, Grocers Name FOOD 4 LESS Addresses / Phones 8360 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422; (805) 461-9699 FAX: (805) 461-0677 3985 South Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401; (805) 782-8989 FAX: (805) 782-8984 1465 Creston Road, Paso Robles, CA 93446; (805) 227-1661 FAX: (805) 227-1665 24-hour Phone: same (Open 24 hours) Web URL www.myfood4less.com Information Food 4 Less has in stock the usual assortment of food and other items found in supermarkets, including a meat and produce department. Name JORDANO’S FOODSERVICE. Address 550 S. Patterson Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Phone (800) 325-2278, (805) 964-0611; FAX (805) 964-3821 Web URL www.jordanos.com E-mail jordanos@jordanos.com Information Food distributor to restaurants and small grocery stores Name SMART AND FINAL Address 277 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 1464 E. Grand Avenue, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 2121 Spring Street, Paso Robles, CA 93446 1721 S. Broadway, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 543-5341 Arroyo Grande: (805) 574-1599 Paso Robles: (805) 237-0323 Santa Maria: (805) 925-6730 24-hour: Contact the Loss Prevention Dept. (323) 974-3740 Web URL www.smartandfinal.com Information After normal business hours try business line first, as there is usually someone there. State your reason for calling and ask to speak to the "Director of Loss Prevention". Leave your name and call back number. The director will call you and make arrangements to open a store. If local stores cannot meet all needs, the manager will arrange for the main warehouse in Vernon to fill an emergency order. Only pallet quantities can be ordered from the warehouse. Warehouse orders will be filled and shipped as soon as possible. A Purchase Order or Requisition Number will be required on each order. Name VITCO FOOD SERVICES Address 830 Capitolio Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 543-0801; 24-hour: Patrick Kaney (805) 543-0800 – Sales Rep Information Vitco provides a broad food service supply including drinks and meat. They also supply related items such as cups and janitorial supplies. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 24 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only FOOD, Water Including drinking water and other drinks Name A-1 WATER Address 567 Carlo Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 Mailing: P.O. Box 1552, Goleta, CA 93116-1552 Phone (805) 685-5000, FAX: (805) 683-2361 24-hour: Dale Elevatorski, owner (805) 680-0372 cell or Kat Donlan (805) 705-0129 Web URL www.a1water.net E-mail dale@a1water.net Information Has large potable and emergency drinking water trucks in fleet Also listed under Food, Field Kitchens and Laundry and Showers. Name ARROWHEAD DRINKING WATER Address 155A Cuyama Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (800) 950-9393 (recorded customer service line), 24-hour: same. Web URL www.arrowheadwater.com Name BOW VALLEY AGRI-LAND SERVICES Address 14500 El Camino Atascadero, CA 93422 Mailing: 69850 Parkfield-Coalinga Rd., San Miguel, CA 93451 Phone (805) 466-1468 24-hour: same or (805) 391- 0105-John Information Bow Valley has 6000 gallon tankers (potable water) A 45' refrigerator with generator and lights, a prep trailer and 100kw generator Name BROOKSTONE EMERGENCY SERVICES Address 41615 Reagan Way, Murrieta, CA 92562 Phone (951) 600-1834; 24-hour dispatch (800) 232-2575; FAX (951) 461-3470 Web URL www.brookstoneesd.com Information Has generators, heaters, portable toilets, tents, potable water, etc. Listed under Generators, Tents, and Toilets also. Name CENTRAL COAST INDUSTRIES Address P.O. Box 2417 (2122 Hutton Road), Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 349-9980; (800) 633-6966; FAX: (805) 349-0471 24-hour: Brian Touey, (805) 896-3777; Shannon Touey (805) 896-7343 Or Veronica, (805) 896-4038 E-mail brian@ccirentals.com or Shannon@ccirentals.com Web URL www.ccirentals.com Information Portable toilets, showers, sinks, water truck, water services. Also listed under, Water, Showers, Portable and Toilets, Portable. Name CRYSTAL SPRINGS WATER COMPANY Address 3215 Rockview Place, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 543-5063, (800) 223-5318; FAX: (805) 543-1057 Web URL www.crystalspringswaterslo.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 25 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name PRO WATER EQUIPMENT RENTAL Address 20395 Somma Drive, Perris, CA 92570 Mailing: PO Box 78205 Corona, CA 92877 Phone (909) 720-2138 E-mail prowater113@aol.com Web URL www.prowaterequipment.com Information Has 8,000 & 10,000 gallon water wagons. Also listed under Water. Name SPARKLETTS BOTTLED WATERS Address P.O. Box 660579, Dallas, TX 75266 Phone (800) 453-0292; FAX (626) 351-7528 Web URL www.sparkletts.com Information Expect extended hold time for Customer Service operator FUEL, Diesel, Commercial Stations Name CAYUCOS GAS MINI MART Address 198 North Ocean Avenue, Cayucos, CA 93430 Phone (805) 995-2600 Information Store open 6 AM to 9 PM. Pumps available 24 hours Name CHEVRON Address 8955 Montecito Road (U.S. 101 Santa Rosa Street off ramp), Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 462-0659 24-hour Mgr., Art Guzman (emergencies only): (805) 264-4256 Information In case of emergency, they will open station. Also, Fire Dept. has keys to the generator tanks. Hours are 5 AM to 11:00 PM every day. Name GOLDEN HILL COUNTRY STORE - EAGLE ENERGY Address Highway 46 East at 2400 Golden Hill Road, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 239-2190; office: (805) 549- 7090 Information Hours: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Name MILLER'S UNOCAL 76 Address 542 Five Cities Drive (4th Street off ramp of U.S. 101), Pismo Beach, CA Phone (805) 773-5727 Information Pumps open 24 hours. Attendant 6 AM to 11 PM. Propane also available. Name NIPOMO MARKETPLACE Address 501 West Tefft Street, Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 929-5562 Information Open 24 hours. Name SAN-PASO TRUCK AND AUTO Address 81 Wellsona Road at U.S. 101 (approximately halfway between Paso Robles and San Miguel), Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 467-9999 Information Open 24 hours SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 26 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only FUEL, Wholesale Distributors and Trucks Name EAGLE ENERGY Address 22515 El Camino Real, Santa Margarita, CA 93453 Phone (805) 438-1510, 24-hour: Matt Schultz (805) 431-3190 Web URL www.eagleenergyinc.com Information Hours: M-F 8 AM to 5 PM. Has fuel trucks that can respond to an incident/staging area. They have card lock pumps at their facilities. Name J.B. DEWAR, INC. Addresses/ Phones 1049 Riverside Avenue, Paso Robles, CA 93446, (805) 238-0634 2403 Golden Hill Road, Paso Robles, CA 93466 2310 S. Meredith Ln., Santa Maria, CA 93436, (805) 925-4061 612 W Boone St., Santa Maria, CA 93458 (805) 925-3650 1131 El Camino Real, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 933 Huber Street, Grover Beach, CA 93433 1400 W Laurel Ave., Lompoc, CA 93426 (805) 736-8262 75 Prado Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, (805) 543-0180 or (800) 549-6457 FAX: (805) 543-8537 Phone See above. 24-hour/emergency: Ken Dewar, (805) 441-0531 cell, (805) 489 -4284 home Web URL www.jbdewar.com Information Dewar has trucks that can respond to an incident/staging area. They also have on site cardlock pumps at their facilities. GENERATORS Name AGGREKO Phone(s) 24/7 National Support Center, for emergencies: (877) 603-6021; Calls routed to area locations in: Santa Fe Springs, San Francisco, Las Vegas NV, Phoenix AZ. Web URL www.aggreko.com Information Rentals of Generators, Air Conditioners, Heaters, Dehumidifiers and Chillers. Aggreko is also listed under “Construction Equipment, Rentals”. Name AIRGAS WEST Address 205 Tank Farm Rd, San Luis Obispo, 93401 2131 Golden Hill Rd, Paso Robles, 93440 Phone SLO office: (805) 544-4433, FAX: (805) 544-0954; Paso office: (805) 237-4007, FAX (805) 237-4049 Web URL www.airgas.com Information Generators and equipment. Also under: EMERGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES, Basic SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 27 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name BROOKSTONE EMERGENCY SERVICES Address 41615 Reagan Way, Murrieta, CA 92562 Phone (951) 600-1834; 24-hour dispatch (800) 232-2575; FAX (951) 461-3470 Web URL www.brookstoneesd.com Information Has generators, heaters, portable toilets, tents, potable water, etc. Listed under Generators, Tents, and Toilets also. Name FIRE EXPEDITORS Address 638 North Eckhoff, Orange, CA 92868 Phone (800) 255-3119, FAX: (714) 388-3980 24hrs: Dave Brown: (714) 392-6580 Web URL www.expeditorsfire.com E-mail info@expeditorsfire.com Information Also listed under Generators, Laundry, Showers, Tents, and Vehicles - Buses Name GRAINGER INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY Address Nearest branch: 101 S. Rice Avenue, Oxnard, CA 93030 Phone (805) 201-3800; FAX: (805) 201-3804 Corp. Customer Care: (800) 755-2021 Web URL www.grainger.com Information Grainger is also listed under “GENERATORS and TOOLS, Other Sources.” Grainger has construction equipment, generators, pumps, and tools. Name NOBLE OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT Address 2935 South Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 2280 S. Meredith, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 541-6090; FAX: (805) 541-3784 Santa Maria: (805) 349-1300; FAX: (805) 349-1334 24-hour, Tim Peterson: (805) 544- 8458 or (805) 440-9900 Web URL www.noblesaw.com E-mail tim@noblesaw.com Information Noble is also listed under “CHAINSAWS , CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, Rental and Tools, Other Sources.” Chainsaws, generators and water pumps. Name SAN LUIS POWERHOUSE Address 798 Francis Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone 24-hours: (805) 543-4643 (Russ Kimmel, Owner) Web URL www.sanluispowerhouse.com E-mail gens@sanluispowerhouse.com Information Portable Generators; larger capacity can be ordered as needed (not installed) Name SILLY MONKEY INC. Address 12018 Tiara St., Valley Village, CA 91607 Phone (818) 262-2618 Web URL Sillymonkeyinc.com Information Generators from 200-1,600 amps also silent generators SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 28 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only HAND CREWS California Conversation Corp, CAL FIRE / Department of Corrections, and California Men's Colony / Department of Corrections crews are available for a number of emergencies and can provide valuable assistance to public entities. Name CALIFORNIA CONSERVATION CORP – CENTRAL COAST DISTRICT Address P.O. 1380, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 549-3561 24-hour: To request CCC for emergency use, contact County OES at 781- 5011 during business hours or the Sheriff Watch Commander after hours at 781-4553. Provide the following information: Nature of problem; approximate number of personnel needed; approximate time frame; and why the CCC resources are needed. Information CCC Central Coast District fields five (5) 12-15 person crews at the base camp in San Luis Obispo and two crews in Santa Maria. Crews may be used for flood control and cleanup, wind/sand storms, oil spills, search and rescue, and earthquake response. Normal work week hours of the crews may not be charged to the requesting agency, however overtime and any required food and lodging (if crews are working beyond commute range from their base center) will be charged. Name CALIFORNIA MEN'S COLONY COMMUNITY WORK CREWS Address P.O. Box 8101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93409 Phone (805) 547-7900, ext. 7070; 24-hour: same. Information The CMC Community Work Crews are available for disaster assistance response. To request the crews, contact the Associate Warden at the West Facility or the Watch Commander at the West Facility by using the above number. Name CAL FIRE Address 635 North Santa Rosa Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone Headquarters: (805) 543-4244; Cuesta Camp (805) 543-9570; 24-hour: CAL FIRE Emergency Command Center at (805) 543-4242 (or CAL FIRE ECC may be contacted on appropriate radio frequencies). Information Cuesta Camp has four crews. These crews may be used for most type of emergencies. Requesting agencies will be billed for crew services, unless arrangements are made for a project ahead of time. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, CONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIES For Oil Spills in the Coastal Zone, contact the National Response Center at (800) 424- 8802, or the U.S. Coast Guard at (310) 732-2043 (emergency calls) or (310) 732-7380 (business calls). The San Luis Obispo County Hazardous Material Coordinator/Team may be contacted at (805) 781- 5544 Monday through Friday. After hours they may be contacted through the Sheriff's Office at (805) 781-4550 or (805) 781-4553. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 29 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES Address 1335 West Main, Santa Maria, CA 93454 2502 Oakwood Drive, Paso Robles, CA 93447 3935 Brown Road, Santa Maria, CA 93456 Phone Paso Robles: (805) 238-3825 FAX: (805) 237-0246 24-hour: Michel Alviso, Manager (805) 591-0227 cell Santa Maria, West Main: (805) 922-5848. FAX: (805) 349-8745 24- hour: John Patino, Manager (805) 714-0405 cell, Santa Maria, Brown Road: (805) 925-9563 FAX: (805) 349-9790 24- hour: Sonia Sanchez, Safety Mgr. (805) 550-3484; Jerry Rodriguez: (805) 451-5641 Web URL www.cpsagu.com Information Crop Production Services is a HazMat contractor and HazMat waste hauler; they will respond to small/moderate size spills of pesticide when responsible party has not been located and/or there is a significant delay for Chemtrec to contact the manufacturer. Name B & T SERVICE STATION CONTRACTORS Address 630 South Frontage Rd, Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 929-8944, (888) 862-2552 FAX: (805) 929-8948 Web URL www.btssc.com E-mail cfasse@btssc.com Information Licensed A, B, C-61. D-40. HazMat Certification, hazardous materials management and clean up. Name CLEAN SEAS Address 990 Cindy Lane, Unit B, Carpinteria, CA 93013 Phone (805) 684-3838; FAX: (805) 684-2650, 24-hour: Same (805) 684-3838, follow prompts duty phone manager Web URL www.cleanseas.com Information Clean Seas has equipment including lighting and vessels for spills occurring at sea or in open waters (oil skimmers). Name A.J. DIANI CONSTRUCTION CO. Address 351 N. Blosser Road/ P.O. Box 636, Santa Maria, CA 93456 Phone (805) 925-9533; FAX: (805) 922-3630 24-hour: (805) 925-9533 Web URL www.diani.com E-mail jasond@diani.com Information A.J. Diani Const. is set up to handle all hazardous material emergencies except radiation. Equipment includes a response trailer and appropriate HazMat suits. They are “Level A” certified. Name IMPACT ABSORBENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC. Address 5255 Traffic Way, Atascadero, CA 93423 Phone (805) 466-4709 FAX: (805) 466-7709 24hr (800) 339-7672; Web URL www.xsorb.com Information Impact Absorbent Technologies makes industrial, commercial and municipal spill and safety supplies. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 30 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name PORTNEY CONSTRUCTION Address 838 Paso Robles St, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Mailing: PO Box 1980, Paso Robles, CA 93447 Phone (805) 237-9949 FAX: (805) 238-7961 Web URL www.portneyconstruction.com Information Licensed to perform demolition, toxic materials abatement, and catastrophe clean-up. HOSPITALS Name ARROYO GRANDE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Address 345 S. Halcyon Road, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone (805) 489-4261 (24-hour); Emergency Room (805) 473-7626 Web URL www.arroyograndehospital.org Name FRENCH HOSPITAL Address 1911 Johnson Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 543-5353 (24-hour); Emergency Room (805) 542-6378 Web URL www.frenchmedicalcenter.org Name MARIAN MEDICAL CENTER Address 1400 East Church Street, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Phone (805) 739-3000 main line recording; Emergency Room (805) 332-8100 Web URL www.marianmedicalcenter.org Name SIERRA VISTA MEDICAL CENTER Address 1010 Murray Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 546-7600 (24-hour); Emergency Room (805) 546-7650 Web URL www.sierravistaregional.com Name TWIN CITIES COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Address 1100 Las Tablas Road, Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-3500; Emergency Room (805) 434-4550 Web URL www.twincitieshospital.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 31 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only LANGUAGE SERVICES Name ASL NETWORK Address P.O. Box 17414, Seattle, Washington 98127 Phone (877) 284-2723; FAX: (206) 527-9557 TTY: (206) 527-9555 Web URL www.aslnetwork.com E-mail manager@aslnetwork.com Information Offer American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreter services. Name ACCESS FOR ALL Address 550 Dana Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone Web URL http://sloaccessforall.org/local-resources-for-people-with- disabilities/interpreters-independant-contractors/ Information Has network database of on website of American Sign Language (ASL) certified interpreters. Each interpreter has profile listed and phone numbers for contact LAUNDRY Name A-1 WATER Address 567 Carlo Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 Mailing: P.O. Box 1552, Goleta, CA 93116-1552 Phone (805) 685-5000, FAX: (805) 683-2361 24-hour: Dale Elevatorski, owner (805) 680-0372 cell or Kat Donlan (805) 705-0129 Web URL www.a1water.net E-mail dale@a1water.net Information Mobile Laundry unit with 10 washers and dryers, propane water heating system, potable and gray water storage bladders Also listed under Food, Field Kitchens, Food and Beverages; Water Name AAA MOBILE SHOWERS Address P.O. Box 1774, Diamond Springs, CA 95619 2000 Camp Nauvoo Rd, Placerville, CA 95667 (equipment yard/storage) Phone (800) 655-8452; FAX: (530) 344-7875 24-hour: (800) 537-1578 Web URL www.aaamobileshowers.com E-mail aaa@calweb.com Information Mobile shower units, mobile on-site laundry units, potable water trucks, gray water trucks, water tenders, hand wash units, tents and canopies, generator and light towers. Affiliated with Blagg’s Food Service. Also listed under Showers, Portable. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 32 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name EL DORADO WATER AND SHOWER SERVICES, INC. Address Po Box 944 (582 Mother Lode Drive) Placerville, CA 95667 Phone (888) 622-8995; FAX: (530) 622-0153; Rodger (530) 622-1067 During office hours, 24-hour: (530) 622-8995 Web URL www.eldoradowaterandshower.com E-mail eldorwater@comcast.net Information Mobile showers, hand wash stations, mobile laundries, mobile kitchen support, gray water trucks, potable water trucks tents and incident base camp packages. Also listed in Mobile Showers and Food, Field Kitchens. Name FIRE EXPEDITORS Address 638 North Eckhoff, Orange, CA 92868 Phone (800) 255-3119, FAX: (714) 388-3980 24hrs: Dave Brown: (714) 392-6580 Web URL www.expeditorsfire.com E-mail info@expeditorsfire.com Information Also listed under Generators, Laundry, Showers, Tents, and Vehicles - Buses LOADERS See Construction Equipment. MEDICAL CLINICS Name COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS Paso Robles CHC Cambria CHC Arroyo Grande: “THE DOCTORS OFFICE” Nipomo: NIPOMO HEALTH CENTER Santa Maria: ARBOR MEDICAL GROUP Address 416 Spring St., Ste 201, Paso Robles, CA 93446 2515 Main St, Cambria, CA 93428 1057 Grand Avenue, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 150 Tejas Place, Nipomo CA 93444 1418 E. Main Street, Suite 210, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Phone 24-hr.: (805) 481-7220 (answering service) Paso Robles: (805) 238-7250, FAX: (805) 238-7250 Cambria: (805) 927-5292, FAX: (805) 927-0354 Arroyo Grande: Phone (805) 270-1700 ; FAX: (805) 481-7097 Nipomo: Phone (805) 929-3211; FAX: (805) 929 -6359 Santa Maria: Phone: (805) 929-3678; FAX: (805) 928-6408 Web URL www.communityhealthcenters.org SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 33 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CUESTA MEDICAL GROUP Address 5920 West Mall, Atascadero, CA 93422 1555 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 171 N. Santa Rosa Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 2238 Bayview Heights Drive, Suite G Los Osos, CA 93402 265 Posada Lane, Suite B, Templeton, CA 93465 Phone Atascadero: (805) 466-0676 San Luis Obispo Higuera Street: (805) 543-4043 San Luis Obispo Santa Rosa Street: (805) 242-0614 Los Osos: (805) 534-1305 Templeton: (805) 434-0900 Web URL www.cuestamedical.com Name FAMILY & INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL CENTER URGENT CARE Address 47 Santa Rosa Street (at Meinecke Street), San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 542-9596; 24-hour: same; FAX: (805) 542-9354 Web URL www.fimcslo.com Name MED STOP Urgent Care Center Address 283 Madonna Road, Suite B, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 549-8880, FAX: (805) 549-8743 Web URL www.medstopurgentcare.com Name NORTH COUNTY CARE Address 636 Spring Street, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 238-2422 FAX: (805) 238-5421 Name TWIN CITIES COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Address 1100 Las Tablas Rd, (not at TCCH ER), Templeton, CA Phone Operator: (805) 434-3500, Admin FAX 24hr: (805) 434-2913 PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES, Local For Law Enforcement Emergency Mutual Aid, contact area law coordinator via the Sheriff’s Office, (805) 781-4550. For Fire Emergency Mutual Aid, contact County Fire / CALFIRE at (805) 543-4242. NOT FOR PUBLIC RELEASE, AS SOME NUMBERS ARE NOT PUBLIC NUMBERS! Prior to releasing FAX numbers to unrelated agencies, businesses, or the public, please contact affected agency for permission Name FIVE CITIES FIRE AUTHORITY Address 140 Traffic Way, Arroyo Grande, CA 93421 Phone (805) 473-5490 FAX (805) 489-0348 Name ARROYO GRANDE POLICE DEPT. Address 200 North Halcyon Road, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone (805) 473-5100; 24-hour: same SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 34 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only FAX (805) 473-2198 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 35 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name ATASCADERO FIRE DEPT. Address 6005 Lewis Avenue, Atascadero, CA 93423 Phone (805) 461-5070 FAX (805) 466-2907 Name ATASCADERO POLICE DEPT. Address 5505 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 461-5051 FAX (805) 461-3702 Name CAMBRIA FIRE DISTRICT Address 2850 Burton Drive, Cambria, CA 93428 Phone (805) 927-6240; 24-hour (CAL FIRE / Co Fire): (805) 543-4242 FAX (805) 927-6242 Name CAYUCOS FIRE DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 707, 201 Cayucos Dr., Cayucos, CA 93430 Phone (805) 995-3372; 24-hour (CAL FIRE / Co Fire): (805) 543-4242 FAX (805) 995-0953 Name CUESTA COLLEGE PUBLIC SAFETY DEPT. Address P.O. Box 8106, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 546-3205 or contact SLO County Watch Commander Name GROVER BEACH POLICE DEPT. Address 711 Rockaway Avenue, Grover Beach, CA 93433 Phone (805) 473-4511: 24-hour: same. FAX (805) 473-4517 Name MORRO BAY FIRE DEPT. Address 715 Harbor Street, Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone (805) 772-6242 / 6245; 24-hour: (805) 772-6225 FAX (805) 772-6253 Name MORRO BAY HARBOR PATROL Address 1275 Embarcadero, Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone (805) 772-6254 (7 AM – 7 PM); 24-hour: (805) 772-6225 (Police Dept.) FAX (805) 772-6258 Name MORRO BAY POLICE DEPT. Address 850 Morro Bay Blvd., Morro Bay, CA 93433 Phone (805) 772-6225; 24-hour: same. FAX (805) 772-2224 Name PASO ROBLES FIRE DEPT. Address 900 Park Street, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 227-7560; 24-hour, Dispatch: (805) 237-6464 FAX Dispatch: (805) 227-4138 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 36 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name PASO ROBLES POLICE DEPT. Address 900 Park Street; Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 237-6464; 24-hour: same. FAX Dispatch: (805) 227-1013; Records: (805) 238-5592 Name PISMO BEACH POLICE DEPT. Address 1000 Bello Street, Pismo Beach, CA 93449 Phone (805) 773-2208; 24-hour: same. FAX (805) 773-3505 Name PORT SAN LUIS HARBOR PATROL Address P.O. Box 249, (3950 Avila Beach Drive) Avila Beach, CA 93424 Phone (805) 595-5400; Also VHF Radio 16 or 12 FAX (805) 595-5404 Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES Address 885 Oklahoma Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 781-4400; 24-hour: 781-4550 Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Address 2156 Sierra Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 781-5544; 24-hour (Emergencies): County Sheriff Dispatch: (805) 781-4550 FAX (805) 781-4211 Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY FIRE DEPT. Address 635 North Santa Rosa Street, San Luis Obispo ,CA 93405 Phone General Info: (805) 543-4244; Fire Prevention: (805) 543-2446; Burn Day Info: (800) 834-2876; 24-hour Emergency: (805) 543-4242 FAX (805) 543-4248 Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES Address 1055 Monterey Street, Room D430, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 Phone (805) 781-5011; 24-hour: Contact County Sheriff Watch Commander: 781 -4553 Direct Lines to OES Coordinators (NOT FOR PUBLIC DISTRIBUTION): Ron Alsop: 781 -5454 Kelly Van Buren: 781-1955 Vince Morici: 781-5020 Rachel Monte: 781-5006 Ashley Reilley: 781-4128 Duty Line: 781-1144 FAX (805) 781-5005 Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY SEARCH AND RESCUE Address P.O. Box 32, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 781-4550; 24-hour: same. FAX (805) 781-1234 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 37 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPT. Address P.O. Box 32, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 781-4550; 24-hour: same; Watch Commander: (805) 781-4553 FAX (805) 781-1234 Name SAN LUIS OBISPO FIRE DEPT. Address 2160 Santa Barbara Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 781-7380; 24-hour: (805) 781-7312 FAX (805) 543-8019 Name SAN LUIS OBISPO POLICE DEPT. Address 1042 Walnut Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 781-7312; 24-hour: same FAX (805) 543-8108 Name SAN MIGUEL FIRE DEPT. Address P.O. Box 180, San Miguel, CA 93451 Phone (805) 467-3300; 24-hour (CAL FIRE / Co Fire): (805) 543-4242 FAX (805) 467-9212 Name SANTA MARGARITA FIRE DEPT. Address P.O. Box 67, Santa Margarita, CA 93453 Phone (805) 438-3185; 24-hour (CAL FIRE / Co Fire): (805) 543-4242 FAX (805) 438-3185 Name TEMPLETON FIRE DEPARTMENT Address P.O. Box 780, Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-4911; 24-hour: CAL FIRE / County Fire: (805): 543-4242 PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES, State NOT FOR PUBLIC RELEASE, AS SOME NUMBERS ARE NOT PUBLIC NUMBERS! Prior to releasing FAX numbers to unrelated agencies, businesses, or the public, please contact affected agency for permission. Name ATASCADERO STATE HOSPITAL FIRE Address P.O. Box 7001, Atascadero, CA 93423-7001 Phone (805) 468-2501; 24-hour: same. FAX (805) 468-2011 Name ATASCADERO STATE HOSPITAL POLICE Address P.O. Box 7001, Atascadero, CA 93423 Phone (805) 468-2366; 24-hour: same. FAX Dispatch: (805) 468-2839; Watch Commander: (805) 468-3403 Name CAL FIRE / COUNTY FIRE Address 635 North Santa Rosa Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 543-4244; Fire Prevention: (805) 543-2446; Burn Day Info: (800) 834-2876; 24-hour: (805) 543-4242 FAX (805) 543-6909 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 38 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CALIFORNIA CONSERVATION CORP Address P.O. Box 1380, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406 Phone (805) 549-3561 FAX (805) 549-5383 Name CALIFORNIA (DEPT. OF) FISH AND GAME Address 20 Lower Ragsdale Drive, Suite 100, Monterey, CA 93940 Phone (831) 649-2870 (business hours) FAX (831) 649-2894 Notes For in progress violations or emergencies, contact (888) DFG-CALTIP. Injured Birds: Call Pacific Wildlife Care (not DF&G) at (805) 543-9453. Name CALIFORNIA (STATE) FIRE MARSHAL Phone Contact CAL FIRE/County Fire at (805) 543-4244; 24-hour: (805) 543- 4242 Name CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL Address 675 California Blvd, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 593-3300; 24-hour and Dispatch: (805) 593-3344 FAX (805) 593-3369 Name CALIFORNIA MEN'S COLONY Address P.O. Box 8101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93409 Phone (805) 547-7849; 24-hour: (805) 547-7900 FAX (805) 547-7504 Name Cal OES, Southern Region Address 4671 Liberty Avenue, Los Alamitos, CA 90720-5158 Phone (562) 795-2900. 24-hour, Sacramento Warning Center: (800) 852-7550 or (916) 845-8911 FAX Southern Region FAX: (562) 795-2877; Warning Center FAX: (916) 845- 8901 Name CALIFORNIA (DEPT. OF) PARKS AND RECREATION Address 750 Hearst Castle Road, San Simeon, CA 93452-9740 Phone (805) 927-2065; 24-hour: (805) 927-2068 (Dispatch) FAX (805) 927-2046 Name CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY POLICE Address San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 Phone (805) 756-2281; 24-hours: same. FAX (805) 756-5051 Name CAMP ROBERTS Station #1, Emergency Services/ Military Dept. Address Building 4050, Camp Roberts, CA 93451-5000 Phone (805) 238-8220; 24-hour: same. FAX Communications Room: (805) 238-8079 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 39 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES, Federal NOT FOR PUBLIC RELEASE, AS SOME NUMBERS ARE NOT PUBLIC NUMBERS! Prior to releasing FAX numbers to unrelated agencies, businesses, or the public, please contact affected agency for permission Name BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT Address 3801 Pegasus Drive, Bakersfield, CA 93308-6837 Phone (661) 391-6110; 24-hour: (559) 781-5780 FAX (559) 781-3320 Name COAST GUARD Address P.O. Box 1319, Morro Bay, CA 93443-1319 Phone (805)772-2167; 24 -hour: LA/Long Beach - (562) 980-4444; Emergency - 800- 221- 8724 FAX (562) 980-4428 Name FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION Address 4914 Wing Way, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 238-0102; 24 hr. national number: (866) 835-5422 FAX FAX: 238-7446 Name FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION Address 11000 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 1700, FOB, Los Angeles, CA 90024-3672 Phone 24-hour: (310) 477-6565 Name FOREST SERVICE Address 1616 North Carlotti Drive, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Phone (805) 925-9538 FAX (805) 961-5781 Name NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE Address 520 N. Elevar Street, Oxnard, CA 93030 Phone (805) 988-6615 / 6610 / 6619 FAX (805) 988-6613 PUBLIC WORKS AGENCIES Name CITY OF ARROYO GRANDE Address Engineering: 208 E. Branch Street; Maintenance: 1375 Ash Street; Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone Engineering: (805) 473-5440; Maintenance: (805) 473-5460; 24-hour Emergency: (805) 473-5100 Web URL www.arroyogrande.org SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 40 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CITY OF ATASCADERO Address 6907 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone Administration: (805) 461-5000; Engineering: (805) 470-3486; Streets: (805) 470-3144; 24-hour: (805) 461-5051 (Dispatch) Web URL www.atascadero.org Name CITY OF GROVER BEACH Address 154 South 8th Street, Grover Beach, CA 93433 Phone (805) 473-4567; 24-hour: (805) 473-4511 (Dispatch) Web URL www.grover.org Name CITY OF MORRO BAY Address 595 Harbor, Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone (805) 772-6200; 24-hour: (805) 772-6225 Web URL www.morro-bay.ca.us Name CITY OF PASO ROBLES Address 1000 Spring Street, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 237-3861, Public Works; 24-hour: (805) 237-6464 (Police) Web URL www.prcity.com Name CITY OF PISMO BEACH Address 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach, CA 93449 Phone (805) 773-4656; 24-hour: (805) 773-2208 (Police) Web URL www.pismobeach.org Name CITY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO Address 919 Palm, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 781-7200; 24-hour: (805) 781-7312 (Police) Web URL www.slocity.org Name COUNTY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO Address County Gov’t Center, Public Works, Room 207, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 Phone (805) 781-5252; 24-hour: (805) 781-4550 (Sheriff Dispatch) Web URL www.slocounty.ca.gov SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 41 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only PUMPS Pumps may also be available from public works agencies, fire departments, contractors and some rental companies (see Construction Equipment, rental). Name CAL POLY, FACILITIES SERVICES Address San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 Phone Plant Operations: (805) 756-2321; Electric Shop: (805) 756-5233; Farm Shop: (805) 756-6440 Plumbing Shop: (805) 756-5236 24-hour: (805) 756-2127 (Power Plant) Information Electric shop has 4 small portable generators (250kw, 150kw, (2) 25kw) Farm shop has large trailer mounted diesel pump with 1000 gpm capacity Plumbing shop has (4)- ½ in pumps and other trash/groundwater pumps Name CALIFORNIA MEN’S COLONY Address P.O. Box 8101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93409 Phone (805) 547-7900, ext. 7984; 24-hour (805) 547-7601, Scott Buffaloe, Plant Operations Information CMC Plant Operations has two small 5 horsepower pumps - has large pump for sewer or potable water pump bypass. Name PORT SAN LUIS HARBOR PATROL Address P.O. Box 249 (3950 Avila Beach Drive), Avila Beach, CA 93424 Phone (805) 595-5400; 24-hr. VHF radio 16 or 12 Information Port San Luis has two gas driven pumps and two small bilge pumps, however the pumps are for harbor area use only and must be used by Harbor Patrol craft only. Name FIVE CITIES FIRE AUTHORITY Address 140 Traffic Way, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone (805) 473-5490 FAX (805) 489-0348 Web URL www.fivecitiesfireauthority.org Information Mass Casualty trailer with BLS supplies for up to 100 people Name COUNTY SEARCH AND RESCUE Phone Request through Sheriff Dept. (805) 781-4550 FAX Web URL Information Mass Casualty unit with BLS supplies for about 25 people. Name COUNTY FIRE Address Rescue 21, based at SLO airport Phone Request through ECC, 24 hour emergency (805)543-4242 FAX Web URL Information Heavy rescue unit with BLS supplies. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 42 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only RAILROAD See Transportation, Railroad. SAND AND GRAVEL Name CALPORTLAND PRODUCTS Address Central Coast Division office: 1625 East Donovan Road, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Phone (805) 357-2808 (central dispatch for all locations); Central Coast Division office: (805) 922-3551 Doug Adams, Transportation Mgr.: (805) 896-3220 Web URL www.calportland.com Information Has five ready-mix plants (Solvang, Lompoc, Santa Maria, San Luis Obispo, and Paso Robles) and sell aggregates, asphalt, and ready mix. Transportation includes bottom hoppers, transfer trucks, cement tanks. Name HANSON AGGREGATES Addresses 131 Suburban Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401; Concrete Dispatch: / Phones (805) 543-8100 180 Atascadero Rd., Morro Bay, CA 93442; (805) 772-2777 2484 Ramada Dr., Paso Robles, CA 93446; (805) 239-9300 Main Office (805) 457-1752 Web URL www.lehighhanson.com Name KRITZ TRUCKING Address 415 Volpi Ysabel, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 239-2686; 24-hour: same. Web URL www.kritztrucking.com E-mail kritztrucking@gmail.com Information Has lots of equipment including loaders, dump trucks, tractors, plus fill dirt. Name MIER BROTHERS LANDSCAPE Address 1049 El Camino Real, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone (805) 473-2014; FAX: (805) 473-2404 Information Have transfer trucks and tractors Name NEGRANTI CONSTRUCTION Address 1424 Old Creek Road (P.O. Box 198), Cayucos, CA 93430 Phone (805) 995-3357; FAX: 995-3281 24-hour: (805) 995-2011, Jon Negranti E-mail negranti.construction@gmail.com Information Have dozer tenders, excavators, water/dump trucks available Name SCHLEGELS SAND & GRAVEL Address 4105 Templeton Road, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 461-7878 Information Have transfer trucks SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 43 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name VIBORG SAND AND GRAVEL INC. Address 607 Crestion Rd, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone (805) 238-4368; FAX: (805) 238-2386 24hr: Paul Viborg (805) 674-9732 (cell) or (805) 434-2890(hm) Web URL www.viborgsand.com E-mail viborg@viborg.com Information Rollers, compactors, crack sealer machine. Also has trucks available at the quarries for transport SANDBAGS A number of local fire departments/districts and city and county public works/engineering departments have sandbags in stock for use in their jurisdiction only. In an emergency situation, contact may be made with some of these departments to see if they have any stock available for sale or use outside of their jurisdictions. Stockpiles vary from agency to agency. SANDBAGS, Retail Sources Name FARM SUPPLY Addresses 224 Tank Farm Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401; (805) 543-3751; / Phones 24-Hour: Jim Brabeck (President and CEO) Home: (805) 528-0514 Cell: (805)441-6321 1079 El Camino Real, Arroyo Grande, CA; (805) 489-5514 24-Hour: Dave Perozzi (manager) (805) 440-0499 2450 Ramada Dr, Paso Robles, CA 93446; (805) 238-1177 24-Hour: Noel Ryan, Manager (805) 238-3401 1920 N. Broadway, Santa Maria, CA; (805) 922-2737 24-Hr.: Rhonda Porter, Manager (805) 698-6245C or (805)934- 1633H 700 McMurray Rd, Buellton, CA 93727; (805) 688-8101 24-Hour: Stephen Watson, Manager (805) 238-4299 Web URL www.farmsupplycompany.com Information Sand bags and supplies in stock Name TEMPLETON FEED AND GRAIN Address 405 South Main St, Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-1136; 24-hour: Tom German Jr. Home: (805) 466-9383 Cell (805) 423-8614 Ricky German (805) 434 -2491 Information 30,000 sandbags/ burlap bags in their inventory. Also have KW truck and trailers SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 44 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only SANDBAGS, Out of County Bulk Sources Name BARON BAG & EROSION SUPPLY Address 1215 N. Kraemer Boulevard, Anaheim, CA 92806 Phone (714) 917-0001; (800) 562-6055; FAX: (714) 917-0020 24-hour: Larry Deman (323) 428-3100 cell; (714) 821-5388 home, Nancy Evens (562) 713-1022 Web URL www.sacbag.com Information Baron has 40,000 to 1,000,000 bags available (burlap and polypropylene) Capable of delivering orders of $10,000+ Can source more from their 2 other California locations (Sacramento Bag Manufacturing Company / Acme Bag Co, Inc. – Chula Vista) Name PACIFIC PACKAGING INDUSTRIES Address 7719 NE 21st Ave, Portland, OR 97211 Phone (971) 271-7456 FAX: (971) 271-7458 24-Hour: Aaron Bond (971) 570-0128 cell Web URL pac-packaging.com E-mail aaron@pac-packaging.com Information Carry packing and shipping supplies including sand bags, 3-layer bags, and bulk packing products Name SACRAMENTO BAG MANUFACTURING CO. / ACME BAG CO., INC. Address 440 N. Pioneer Avenue, Ste 300, Woodland, CA 95776 1031 Bay Boulevard, Suite J, Chula Vista CA 91911 Phone Sacramento: 1-800-287-2247; FAX: (530) 662-6381 Chula Vista: (619) 429-9800; FAX: (619) 429-0969 24-Hour contact: Tony Panelli (Account Manager): (661) 213-6315 work cell, (661) 589-5260 office, (661) 809-6186 personal cell Affiliated with Baron Bag & Erosion Supply Web URL www.sacbag.com Name SADDLEBACK SANDBAGS Address 6090 Etiwanda Avenue, Mira Loma, CA 91752 Phone (800) 286-7263, (951) 727-9547 FAX: (951) 727-9546 E-mail saddlebackco@gmail.com Web URL www.esandbags.com Information Carry empty bags only Name SOUTHWEST BAG CO. Address 1380 East 6th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90021 Phone (213) 622-6108 24 Hour: Allen Spiwack, Home: (310) 838-4970 Cell: (310) 291-9041 Office: (213) 622-8083 Allen or Aaron Web URL www.southwesternbag.com E-mail southwesternbagco@gmail.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 45 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name THE BAG LADY INC. Address 11124 Valley Avenue E, Puyallup, WA 98372 Phone (253) 770-8606, FAX: (253) 435-9153 24hr: Morris Malone, Owner: (253) 365-9819 Web URL www.bagladyinc.net E-mail tblmorris@gmail.com Information Have Megga Bagger (able to fill 1600-2400 bags per hour) and offer full erosion control services SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL DISTRICTS Name ATASCADERO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 5601 West Mall, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 462-4200; FAX: (805) 462-4421 Superintendent: Deborah Bowers (805) 462-4217 E-MAIL: debroahbowers@atasusd.org Web URL www.atasusd.org Name CAYUCOS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 301 Cayucos Drive, Cayucos, CA 93430 Phone (805) 995-3694; FAX: (805) 995-2876 Superintendent: Anne Hubbard E-MAIL: ahubbard@cayucosschool.org Web URL www.cesd-ca.schoolloop.com Name COAST UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 1350 Main Street, Cambria, CA 93428 Phone (805) 927-3880; FAX: (805) 927-3880 Superintendent: Vicki Schumacher (805) 927-6121 E-MAIL: vschumacher@coastusd.org Web URL www.coastusd.org Name LUCIA MAR UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 602 Orchard Street, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone (805) 474-3000 FAX: (805) 481-1398 Superintendent: Jim Hogeboom E-MAIL: jhogeboom@lmusd.org Web URL www.luciamar.k12.ca.us Name PASO ROBLES JOINT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 800 Niblick Road, Paso Robles, CA 93447 Phone (805) 769-1000; FAX; (805) 237- 3339 Superintendent: Chris Williams E-MAIL: cpwilliams@pasoschools.org Web URL www.pasoschools.org SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 46 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name PLEASANT VALLEY JOINT UNION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 2025 Ranchita Canyon Road, San Miguel, CA 93451 Phone (805) 467-3453; FAX: (805) 467-2306 Superintendent: Gil Campos E-MAIL: gcampos@plesant-valley-school.org Web URL www.pleasant-valley-school.org Name SAN LUIS COASTAL UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 1500 Lizzie Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401-3062 Phone (805) 549-1200 Superintendent: Eric Prater (805) 549-1202 E-MAIL: EPrater@slcusd.org Web URL www.slcusd.org Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Address 3350 Education Drive, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 543-7732 Superintendent: Dr. James J Brescia (805) 782-7201 E-MAIL: jbrescia@slocoe.org Director of Op Svs David Keil (805) 782-7257 Web URL www.slocoe.org Information If possible contact Dave Keil first at 782-7257. (FAX: 544-5174) Name SAN MIGUEL JOINT UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 1601 “L” Street, San Miguel, CA 93451 Phone (805) 467-3216; FAX: (805) 467-3410 Interim Superintendent: Curt Dubost (805) 467-3216 ex. 204 E-MAIL: cdubost@sanmiguelschools.org Web URL www.sanmiguelschools.org/ Name SHANDON JOINT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 79 (101 So. 1st Street), Shandon, CA 93461 Phone (805) 238-0286; FAX: (805) 283-0777 Superintendent: Teresa Taylor (805) 238-0286 E-MAIL: ttaylor@shandonschools.org Web URL www.shandonschools.org Name TEMPLETON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 960 Old Country Road, Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-5800; FAX: (805) 434-5879 Superintendent: Joe Koski (805) 434-5805 E-MAIL: jkoski@tempeltonusd.org Web URL tusd.ca.schoolloop.comrr SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 47 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only SEARCH AND RESCUE Contact Sheriff’s Watch Commander, 781-4453 or 781-4550. SECURITY GUARD COMPANIES, Private Name BOMAR SECURITY AND INVESTIGATIONS Address 4251 S Higuera Street, Suite M, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 222 W. Carmen Lane, #204, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Phone San Luis Obispo: Phone: (805) 544-0185, FAX: (805) 528-0982 Santa Maria: (805) 928-5222, Toll Free: 1(800) 594-6006, FAX: (805) 928-1114 Web URL www.bomarsi.com E-mail info@bomarsi.com Information Per website, offers uniformed security, mobile patrol, verification surveillance, technical services, and investigations. Name CENTURION PRIVATE SECURITY Address 895 Napa Avenue, Suite A-2, Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone (805) 464-9640, FAX: (805) 772-5364 Web URL www.centurionprivatesecurity.com E-mail contact@centurionprivatesecurity.com Information Per website they offer uniformed patrol services, vehicle patrol services, site security, parking enforcement and fire watch. Name FIVE CITIES SECURITY AND INVESTIGATIONS Address 11549 Los Osos Valley Road, Suite 204, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 543-1049; FAX: (805) 543-1810 24hr On Duty Cells: (805) 235-7886 or (805) 235-7885 Owner Vicki Rush also available: (805) 471-0414 Web URL www.fivecitiessecurity.com E-mail fivecitiessecurity@hotmail.com Information Per website has over 25 security guards on staff, provides uniformed patrol and guard services. Name SAN LUIS SECURITY, INC. Address P.O. Box 2620, Atascadero, CA 93423-2620 Phone (805) 466-8016, FAX: (805) 466-0788 Web URL www.sanluissecurity.com E-mail kdahlen805@charter.net SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 48 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only SELF CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS FILL STATIONS For fill station locations, contact CAL FIRE / County Fire at (805) 543-4244, business hours; (805) 543-4242 (after hours). SHOWERS, Portable Name A-1 WATER Address 567 Carlo Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 Mailing: P.O. Box 1552, Goleta, CA 93116-1552 Phone (805) 685-5000, FAX: (805) 683-2361 24-hour: Dale Elevatorski, owner (805) 680-0372 cell or Kat Donlan (805) 705-0129 Web URL www.a1water.net E-mail dale@a1water.net Information Have Mobile shower trailers (4,6,10, 12, 16, 18, or 22 stall configurations) with sinks, Men/Women, Self-contained with generators and water heating systems Also listed under Food, Field Kitchens; Food and Beverages; Water; Laundry Name AAA MOBILE SHOWERS Address P.O. Box 1774, Diamond Springs, CA 95619 2000 Camp Nauvoo Rd, Placerville, CA 95667 (equipment yard/storage) Phone (800) 655-8452; FAX: (530) 344-7875 24-hour: (800) 537-1578 Web URL www.aaamobileshowers.com E-mail aaa@calweb.com Information Mobile shower units, mobile on-site laundry units, potable water trucks, gray water trucks, water tenders, hand wash units, tents and canopies, generator and light towers. Affiliated with Bagg’s Food Service. Also listed under Laundry. Name ACTION SANITARY, INC. Address PO Box 492 / 12018 Spruce Grove Road, Lower Lake, CA 95457 Phone 24hr: (707) 994-5068; FAX: (707) 994-1647; Jerry Campo, cell (707) 350-5317, (707) 994-9741 home E-mail jerrycampo@actionsanitaryinc.com Name BEN PORTA SHOWERS Address PO Box 1198 (720 Colusa Highway), Gridley, CA 95948 Phone (530) 846-4110; (530) 534-1752; (800) 767-8276; FAX: (530) 846-4827 Web URL www.benportashowers.com E-mail tomcasey@benportashowers.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 49 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CENTRAL COAST INDUSTRIES Address P.O. Box 2417 (2122 Hutton Road), Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 349-9980; (800) 633-6966; FAX: (805) 349-0471 24-hour: Brian Touey, (805) 896-3777; Shann on Touey (805) 896-7343 Or Veronica, (805) 896-4038 E-mail brian@ccirentals.com or Shannon@ccirentals.com Web URL www.ccirentals.com Information Portable toilets, showers, sinks, water truck, water services. Also listed under, Food, Water; and Toilets, Portable. and Water Name EL DORADO WATER AND SHOWER SERVICES, INC. Address Po Box 944 (582 Mother Lode Drive) Placerville, CA 95667 Phone (888) 622-8995; FAX: (530) 622-0153; Rodger (530) 622-1067 During office hours, 24-hour: (530) 622-8995 Web URL www.eldoradowaterandshower.com E-mail eldorwater@comcast.net Information Mobile showers, hand wash stations, mobile laundries, mobile kitchen support, gray water trucks, potable water trucks tents and incident base camp packages. Also listed in Laundry and Food, Field Kitchens. Name FIRE EXPEDITORS Address 638 North Eckhoff, Orange, CA 92868 Phone (800) 255-3119, FAX: (714) 388-3980 24hrs: Dave Brown: (714) 392-6580 Web URL www.expeditorsfire.com E-mail info@expeditorsfire.com Information Also listed under Generators, Laundry, Showers, Tents, and Vehicles - Buses Name REZEK EQUIPMENT Address 970 Reece St., San Bernardino, CA 92411 Phone (800) 739-3979 FAX: (800) 739-3920 24 hr.: (909) 888-3008; Cell: (951) 236-6444 (Ron) Web URL www.rezekequipment.com E-mail rrr@ronrezek.com Information Rezek has communication trailers, command trailers. (They also have a large variety of other equipment, such lighting and generators, and semi- trucks set up as field kitchens, capable of serving 3000 meals. Adding Portable sink and shower unit trailers to their fleet.) Also under: Communications, Radio; Food, Field Kitchen TENTS AND PARTY RENTALS Name GOT YOU COVER’D Address 211 Tank Farm Road, San Luis Obispo, CA Phone (805) 541-8368 Web URL gycrentals.com E-mail info@gycrentals.com Information Tent, Table, Chair rental. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 50 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name BROOKSTONE EMERGENCY SERVICES Address 41615 Reagan Way, Murrieta, CA 92562 Phone (951) 600-1834; 24-hour dispatch (800) 232-2575; FAX (951) 461-3470 Web URL www.brookstoneesd.com Information Has generators, heaters, portable toilets, tents, potable water, etc. Listed under Generators, Tents, and Toilets also. Name FIRE EXPEDITORS Address 638 North Eckhoff, Orange, CA 92868 Phone (800) 255-3119, FAX: (714) 388-3980 24hrs: Dave Brown: (714) 392-6580 Web URL www.expeditorsfire.com E-mail info@expeditorsfire.com Information Also listed under Generators, Laundry, Showers, Tents, and Vehicles - Buses TOILETS, PORTABLE Name AMERICAN MARBORG SANITATION Address 2727 Concrete Court, Paso Robles, Ca 93446 P.O. Box 2978, Atascadero, CA 93423 Phone 24hrs: (805) 239-2007 or (800) 422-0229; FAX: (805) 226-9948 E-mail brbetty@marborg.com Information Also provides temporary fencing. Name BROOKSTONE EMERGENCY SERVICES Address 41615 Reagan Way, Murrieta, CA 92562 Phone (951) 600-1834; 24-hour dispatch (800) 232-2575; FAX (951) 461-3470 Web URL www.brookstoneesd.com Information Has generators, heaters, portable toilets, tents, potable water, etc. Listed under Generators, Tents, and Toilets also. Name CENTRAL COAST INDUSTRIES Address P.O. Box 2417 (2122 Hutton Road), Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 349-9980; (800) 633-6966; FAX: (805) 349-0471 24-hour: Brian Touey, (805) 896-3777; Shannon Touey (805) 896-7343 Or Veronica, (805) 896-4038 E-mail brian@ccirentals.com or shannon@ccirentals.com Web URL www.ccirentals.com Information Portable toilets, showers, sinks, water truck, water services. Also listed under, Food, Water, Showers, Portable; and Water SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 51 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name FENCE FACTORY RENTALS Address 2650 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 462-1362, FAX: (805) 462-1367 24hr: (805) 895-3150 – Jerry (Manager) E-mail isilva@fencefactoryrentals.com Web URL www.fencefactoryrentals.com Information Also provides temporary fencing and portable sinks. Name HARVEY'S HONEYHUTS Address 465 Norfolk St., Cambria, CA 93428 P.O. Box 805, Cambria, CA 93428 Phone (805) 927-8554 or (800) 222-4887; FAX:(805) 927-4455; 24hr: (805) 909-9528- Owner Jennifer Smith or Cell (805) 540 1488 Manager Sergio Mendoza E-mail honeyhuts@gmail.com Web URL www.honeyhuts.com Name J.W. ENTERPRISES Address 1689 Morse Avenue, Ventura, CA 93003 Phone (800) 350-3331; FAX: (805) 658-0638 Web URL www.jwenterprises.com Information Portable sanitation and temporary power (needs City Permit), serving CA coast from SF to LA. Name PORTABLE JOHNS INC. Address 547-H. W. Bettravia Road, Suite H, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone (800) 640-6488, (805) 928-6488; FAX (805) 928-7347 Web URL www.portablejohns.net E-mail portjohns@hotmail.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 52 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only TOOLS, Other Sources Name GRAINGER INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY Address Nearest branch: 101 S. Rice Avenue, Oxnard, CA 93030 Phone (805) 201-3800; FAX: (805) 201-3804 Corp. Customer Care: (800) 755-2021 Web URL www.grainger.com Information Grainger is also listed under “GENERATORS and TOOLS, Other Sources.” Grainger has construction equipment, generators, pumps, and tools. Name NOBLE OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT Address 2935 South Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 2280 S. Meredith, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 541-6090; FAX: (805) 541-3784 Santa Maria: (805) 349-1300; FAX: (805) 349-1334 24-hour, Tim Peterson: (805) 544- 8458 or (805) 440-9900 Web URL www.noblesaw.com E-mail tim@noblesaw.com Information Noble is also listed under “CHAINSAWS and CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, Rental.” Chainsaws, generators and water pumps. TOW SERVICES, CHP SLO area Name CITY MOTORS TOWING Address 512 So. Oakley Ave, Santa Maria, CA 93458 Phone (805) 922-8787, FAX: (805) 928-7187 E-mail kevin@citymotorstowing.com Web URL www.citymotorstowing.com Name CENTRAL COAST TOWING Address 2160 Nipomo Street, Oceano, CA 93445 Phone (805) 489-6096, FAX: 805 489-6036 Web URL Centralcoasttowing.com E-mail centralcoasttow@charter.net Information General towing and recovery Name CHUCK’S TOWING Address 483 Quintana Road Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone (805) 772-4641, FAX: (805) 772-2585 2ndary: (805) 772-4089 E-mail mail@chuckstowinginc.com Name COLLEGE TOWING Address 1701 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 94 Atlantic City Avenue, Grover Beach, CA 93433 Phone San Luis Obispo: (805) 544-3560, FAX: (805) 546-0802 Grover Beach: (805) 489-8600, FAX: (805) 489-8687 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 53 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only E-mail collegetowing@hotmail.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 54 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name FOUR CORNERS TOWING Address 909 S. 4th Street, Grover Beach, CA 93433 519 S. Oakley, Santa Maria, CA 93458 Phone Grover Beach: (805) 489-7116, FAX: (805) 489-3910 Santa Maria: (805) 922-6707, FAX: (805) 925-0656 Web URL www.fourcornerstowing1.com E-mail fourcornerstowing323@yahoo.com Information Able for commercial towing Name JOHN BOY’S TOWING Address 2121 Nipomo Street, Oceano, CA 93445 (Mailing: 2091 21st Street) 750 Humbert Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 1850 Ramada Dr., Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone Oceano: (805) 474-4357, FAX: (805) 481-8938 San Luis Obispo: (805) 543-4357, FAX: (805) 543-4006 Paso Robles: (805) 239-8698, FAX: (805) 481-8699 Web URL www.johnboystowing.com E-mail balindacoulter@sbcglobal.net Information Recovery tows, general towing and large equipment hauling. Name KAUTZ TOWING Address 985 South 4th Street, Grover Beach, CA 93433 Phone (805) 489-2336, FAX: (805) 489-1002 Information Off Road towing. Name MARTIN’S TOWING Address 723 Woodbridge Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (Mailing: P.O. Box 3521) Phone (805) 543-1167, FAX: (805) 543-1311 E-mail Martins247@charter.net Information General towing only. (Light/Medium Duty) Name SLO TOW Address 34 South Street, San Luis Obispo, CA. 93401 Phone (805) 543-1919, FAX: (805) 781-3948 E-mail sidstark2005@yahoo.com TOW SERVICES, CHP Templeton area Name ALLIANCE TOWING Address 1148 Paso Robles Street, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone 24-hour: (805) 226-9099, FAX: (805) 226-0833 E-mail allianceliens@yahoo.com Information Evidence and CHP patrol car tow. Recovering towing.(Light Duty) Name ALWAYS TOWING AND RECOVERY Address 445 Espinosa Road, Salinas, CA 93907 Phone (831) 424-8698, FAX: (831) 444-9139 E-mail alwaystowinginc@yahoo.com Information Recovery and towing. (Light/Medium/Heavy) SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 55 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CAMBRIA TOWING Address 4363 Bridge Street, Cambria, CA 93428 Phone 24-hour: (805) 927-4357, FAX: (805) 927-0050 E-Mail rnjadams@sbcglobal.net Information Recovery and general towing.(Light and Medium Duty) Name C & D TOWING Address 3030 Ramada Drive, Paso Robles, CA 93446 5455 Traffic Way, Suite C, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone 24-hour: (805) 239-2850, FAX: (805) 239-2895 E-mail cdtowing@wildblue.net Information General towing (Light and Medium) Name FOUR CORNERS TOWING Address 909 S. 4th Street, Grover Beach, CA 93433 519 S. Oakley, Santa Maria, CA 93458 Phone Grover Beach: (805) 489-7116, FAX: (805) 489-3910 Santa Maria: (805) 922-6707, FAX: (805) 925-0656 Web URL www.fourcornerstowing1.com E-mail fourcornerstowing323@yahoo.com Information Able for commercial towing Name GOLDEN EMPIRE TOWING Address 1915 S. Union Avenue, Bakersfield, CA 93307 Phone 24-hour: (661) 834-8697; FAX: (661) 834-4591 Owner’s Cell: (661) 201-9192 – Wayne Dotson Web URL www.goldenempiretow.com E-Mail wdotson@goldenempiretow.com Information Recovery. Able for heavy duty (buses) Name JOHN BOY’S TOWING Address 2121 Nipomo Street, Oceano, CA 93445 (Mailing: 2091 21st Street) 750 Humbert Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 1850 Ramada Dr., Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone Oceano: (805) 474-4357, FAX: (805) 481-8938 San Luis Obispo: (805) 543-4357, FAX: (805) 543-4006 Paso Robles: (805) 239-8698, FAX: (805) 481-8699 Web URL www.johnboystowing.com E-mail balindacoulter@sbcglobal.net Information Recovery tows, general towing and large equipment hauling. Name PETE JOHNSTON TOWING Address 2485 Theatre Drive, Paso Robles, CA. 93446 (Mailing: P.O. Box 607, PR, 93447) Phone (805) 238-1535, FAX: (805) 239-1795 Web URL www.petejohnstontowing.com E-mail Towing@PeteJohnstonTowing.com Information Recovery and general towing. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 56 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name PRO TOW Address 6931-A Sycamore Road, Atascadero, CA 93422 (Mailing: P.O. Box 1321) Phone (805) 462-8080, FAX: (805) 462-8181 Web URL www.towingforyou.com E-mail protow@towingforyou.com Information Recovery, general towing and equipment transport up to 10,000lbs. Name WEST COAST AUTO & TOWING Address 8365 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone 24-hour: (805) 466-1070 Office(805) 466-8228, FAX: (805) 466-9861 Web URL westcoastautoandtowing.com E-mail rjamborn@aol.com Information Owner: Ryan Amborn Big rig tows, recovery and general towing. TRAFFIC CONTROL EQUIPMENT See also “CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, Rentals” as rental companies may also carry cones, lights/beacons, arrow boards, barricades, etc. See also “Public Works Departments.” Name ALERT-O-LITE Address 2379 South G Street, Fresno, CA 93721 2020 Winery Ave., Fresno, CA 93703 Phone G St: (559) 486-4570; FAX: (559) 486-1789; Winery Ave: (559) 453-2470; FAX: 454-5861 24-hour: (800) 233-3652, advise answering service that it is an emergency Web URL www.alertolite.com E-mail service@alertolite.com Information Carry variety of traffic control supplies and equipment Name STATEWIDE SAFETY & SIGNS INC. Address 522 Lindon Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 929-5070; FAX: (805) 929-5786; 24-hour (800) 559-7080 Web URL www.statewidesafety.com Information Statewide has traffic signs, stop signs, street signs, and intersection signs. Name UNITED RENTAL Address 635 Tank Farm Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 543-7297; 24-hour: same, or (805) 431-0322, Tim Haveman; (805) 431-0440, Matthew Tackett Web URL www.ur.com or www.unitedrentals.com Information United Rentals has traffic signs, cones, barricades, barriers, arrow boards, and light towers. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 57 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only TRANSPORTATION Name BULK TRANSPORTATION Address 415 Lemon Avenue, Walnut, CA 91789 (Mailing: P.O. Box 390) 3032 S. El Dorado Street, Stockton, CA 95206 (Mailing: P.O. Box 6068) 16350 Beaver Rd, Adelanto, CA 92301 Phone Walnut Creek: (909) 594-2855, FAX: (909) 595-9983 24-hour: Stockton: (209) 466 -0481; FAX (209) 465-8060 Adelanto: (760) 843-0774; FAX(760) 843-0775 Web URL www.bulk-dti.com E-mail walnutdispatch@bulk-dti.com TRANSPORTATION, RAILROAD Name UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD Address 13th Street, St. Louis, MO. 1400 Douglas Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68179 Phone (888) 870-8777; FAX: (402) 501-0634 24-hour emergency: (888) 877-2567, option 2 emergency line; (800) 892-1283 (Risk Mgmt.) For Media: Public Relations, Francisco Castillo (916) 789-6019 – Office or (916) 200-6246 – Cell Web URL www.uprr.com UTILITIES, Pipelines Name CHEVRON USA, INC. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Address Pipeline: Estero Bay thru Shandon and Cholame, CA. 4000 Hwy 1, Morro Bay, CA 93442 Phone (805) 772-2611; FAX: (805) 772-0895 24-hour/emergencies only: (800) 762-3404 or (805) 547-5440 Name NAS LEMOORE FUEL PIPELINE Address Pipeline: Estero Bay to Lemoore, CA Phone EOC (Business hours only) (559) 998-2955 24-hour: Emerg. Mgmt. Officer: (559) 998-1193 Command Duty Officer: (559) 707-0001 (559) 469-3131(cell) - Rainer Streib, Emergency Manager (Also radio communications with Kings County Sheriff's Department) Information Pipeline abandoned - purged, but nitrogen pressure is on. CODE: OOK. Name SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS Address P.O. Box 6466, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Phone District Manager: (805) 781-2424 24-hour: For any area emergencies involving Southern California Gas call: (800) 427-4200 Web URL www.socalgas.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 58 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name PHILLIPS 66/ CONOCO CORPORATION REFINERY Address 2555 Willow Road, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone 24hrs: (805) 489-4050, ext. 3214 or 343-1776 ext. 3214 Operations Area Shift Supervisor on duty Name STATE FIRE MARSHAL Address Call OES Warning Center Phone (916) 845-8911 Information SFM oversees pipelines. Name UNDERGROUND SERVICE ALERT Phone (800) 642-2444 Information Alerts responsible companies for pipeline leaks or ruptures only. Call before you dig: 2 day notice! UTILITIES, Public Name PG&E, SAN LUIS OBISPO ELECTRICAL CONTROL CENTER Phone (805) 546-1211 / 1200 (unlisted numbers for public safety agencies use only, do not release to the public); 24-hour emergency / customer service: (800) 743-5000 Information 24-hour countywide power transmission info Name SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS Address P.O. Box 6466, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Phone District Manager: (805) 781-2424 24-hour: For any area emergencies involving Southern California Gas call: (800) 325-4070; (800) 427-4200 for leaks Web URL www.socalgas.com Name AT&T Address 196 Suburban Road (P.O. Box 8111), San Luis Obispo, CA 93403-8111 Phone Network Operations Center: (800) 662-0266 Emergency Control Center: (916) 977-7777 Central Control Office /Network Reliability Center: (916) 977-7582, Repair Service (Emergency Response Agencies Only): (800) 332-1321, (800) 275-0014; (800) 310-2355 Engineering: Neil Zakaria: (W) (805) 546-7012; (C) (805) 704-3813 Engineering Supervisor: David Whitehead (805) 546-7389 Web URL www.att.com Information AT&T has installed a special phone line/number at the EOC to coordinate and expedite ordering of emergency phones and phone lines by all agencies and jurisdictions in times of emergency. This number is operational when the County EOC is activated (and staffed by AT&T). SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 59 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only UTILITIES, Sewer Name COUNTY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO PUBLIC WORKS Address County Gov’t Center, Public Works, Room 206, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 Phone (805) 781-5252 Name CAMBRIA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 65 (1316 Tamson Drive), #201 Cambria, CA 93428 Phone (805) 927-6223; Fire District: (805) 927-6240 Name CAYUCOS SANITARY DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 333, Cayucos, CA 93430-0333 Phone (805) 995-3290 Name NIPOMO COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 326 (148 South Wilson St.), Nipomo, CA 93444-0326 Phone (805) 929-1133 and (805) 929-1931 Name OCEANO COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 599, Oceano, CA 93475 Phone (805) 481-6730; FAX: (805) 481- 6836 Name SAN MIGUEL COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 180 (1150 Mission Street), San Miguel, CA 93451 Phone (805) 467-3834; FAX: (805) 467-9212 Name SOUTH SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 339, Oceano, CA 93445 Phone (805) 489-6666; FAX: (805) 489-2765 Name TEMPLETON COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 780, Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-4900; FAX: (805) 434-4820 SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 60 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only VEHICLES BUSES, Charter Name FIRE EXPEDITORS Address 638 North Eckhoff, Orange, CA 92868 Phone (800) 255-3119, FAX: (714) 388-3980 24hrs: Dave Brown: (714) 392-6580 Web URL www.expeditorsfire.com E-mail info@expeditorsfire.com Information Also listed under Generators, Laundry, Showers, and Tents Name ORANGE BELT STAGES Address P.O. Box 949, Visalia 93279 Phone Business phone (559) 733-4408; FAX: (559) 733-0538 24-hour phone 800-266-7433 Web URL www.orangebelt.com E-mail info@orangebelt.com Information Over Twenty (20) 47 to 55 passenger buses based in Bakersfield, Fresno, and Visalia. Name SILVERADO STAGES Address 241 Prado Road, San Luis Obispo 93401 Phone SLO Office: (805) 545-8400; FAX: (805) 364-5470 24hr phone: (805) 544-7658 (Jim Galusha, owner, residence) Web URL www.silveradostages.com Information One (1) 56- passenger, one (1) 52- passenger, two (2) 48- passenger, and seven (7) 47- passenger buses BUSES, Regional and City Transit Name SAN LUIS OBISPO REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY (SLORTA) Address 1150 Osos St., #206, San Luis Obispo 93401; Phone (805) 781-4472; Admin: (805) 781-4833; Dispatch: (805) 541-2228 Executive Director, (805) 781-4465 (Office); (705) 458-8216 (Cell) Phil Morris, Director, Service Delivery, (805) 781- 4467 Office; (805) 235- 5807 (cell). Web URL www.slorta.org Information The San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority (SLORTA), under the direction of the County and cities, facilitates the movement of residents and visitors through regional transportation and information services. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 61 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only BUSES, School NOTE: Passenger capacity generally refers to children Name ATASCADERO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address Billing only: 5601 West Mall, Atascadero, CA 93422 Location of buses and transportation office: 7125 Santa Lucia Ave. Phone (805) 462-4250 – Transportation Dept. Wendy Morin – Dispatcher: (805) 431-4224 Louise Mayhew (805) 464-9073 or Office (805) 462-4256 24-hour District emergency number: (805) 462-4200 Information Seven (7) 90-passenger; ten (10) 84-passenger, one (1) 82-passenger, two (2) 78-passenger, nine (9) wheelchair capable buses Name CAYUCOS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 301 Cayucos Drive, Cayucos, CA 93430-3694 Phone (805) 995-3694; 24-hour: Ismael Mora (805) 459-7482 or Martin Buller (805) 458-5857 Information One (1) 79-passenger bus Name COAST UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 2950 Santa Rosa Creek Road, Cambria, CA 93428 Phone (805) 927-3880, District Office; (805) 927-8567, Transportation Dept.; (805) 927-0312, FAX Information One (1) 87-pass; Two (2) 84-pass; three (3) 78-pass; one (1) 62-pass; two (2) 32-pass; one (1) 24-pass; one (1) 20-pass. Vans also in fleet: three (3) 9 pass and one (1) 6-pass Name LUCIA MAR UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 602 Orchard Street, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 Phone (805) 474-3100 24-hour: Transportation Coordinator Sharon; cell: (805) 431-0059, home: (805) 929-6329 Information At least 46 buses ranging in capacity from 14 to 90, Name PASO ROBLES PUBLIC SCHOOLS Address 800 Niblick Rd, Paso Robles, CA 93446 Phone Transportation: (805) 769-1600 Mr. Ashley Lightfoot (Dir. of Business Ops): (805) 801-2076 (district cell) Kelly Stainbrook (Transportation Supervisor): (805) 286-5767 (dist. Cell) Web URL http://king.prps.k12.ca.us/ssf/home/transportation.HTM Information 35 buses in fleet: (6) 84-pass, (6) 81-pass, (4) 78-pass, (1) 67-pass, (3) 48-pass Wheelchair: (1) each of 39/36/35/34-pass, (4) 30-pass, and (7) 24-pass Name SAN LUIS COASTAL UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 937 Southwood Dr., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 596-4111; 24-hour: (805) 546-3607 Web URL http://www.slcusd.org/pages/district/departments/bgt Information 39 buses ranging in capacity from approximately 20 to 90. Also 9 vans. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 62 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Address 3350 Education Dr., San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 Phone (805) 543-7732 24-hour: David Keil (cell) (805) 235-3236 Information Two (2) 84-passenger, one (1) 78-passenger, one (1) 62-passenger buses Eight (8) 5 passenger vehicles vans/SUVs Name SAN MIGUEL JOINT UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 1601 L Street, San Miguel, CA 93451 Phone (805) 467-3216; 24-hour: Janice Lynch; home: (805) 238-2470 cell: (805) 712-7966 Information Three buses: 72-seat, 84-seat, 22-seat (special needs) Name SHANDON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 79, Shandon, CA 93461-0079 Phone (805) 239-2326 24-hour: Gil LaChance cell (05) 835-5921 Information Two (2) 80-passenger, one (1) 42-passenger, one (48)-passenger with wheelchair capability Name TEMPLETON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Address 960 Old County Rd., Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-5858 24-hour: Chris Brown (805) 434-5855 Information Three (3) 84-passenger, one (1) 12-passenger and capability for two(2) wheelchairs VEHICLES, Car Rentals Name BUDGET RENT-A-CAR Address / 901-3 Airport Drive, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401,(805) 541-2722 Phone 2800 Broad Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, (805) 541-3977 2631 Riverside Avenue, Paso Robles, CA 93446 (805) 226-9470 1730 S. Broadway, Santa Maria, CA 93454 (805) 922-2158 3249 Terminal Drive, Santa Maria, CA 93455 (805) 922-3113 24-hr.: (800) 218-7992 – Customer Service/Reservations Web URL www.budget.com Name ENTERPRISE RENT A CAR Address / 2989 Broad Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (805) 546-6270 Phone 12318 Los Osos Valley Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405 (805) 545-9111 901 Airport Drive, STE 3, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (805) 595-5455 502 W. Grand Avenue, STE A, Grover Beach, CA 93433 (805) 489-6161 7434 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 (805) 461-0871 633 Spring Street, Paso Robles, CA 93446 (805) 239-0628 1738 S. Broadway, Santa Maria, CA 93454 (805) 349-9552 3249 Terminal Drive, STE 114, Santa Maria, CA 93455 (805) 352-1016 24-hr. corporate #: (800) 261-733 Web URL www.enterprise.com SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 63 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only VOLUNTEER SERVICES Name RADIO AMATEUR CIVIL EMERGENCY SERVICE(RACES) Phone Contact County Communications at 781-5129. For emergencies after hours, contact duty County OES Coordinator at 781-1144. Information RACES provides excellent alternate communications services for agencies during emergencies. RACES is an integral part of the County's emergency response system and regularly works with CAL FIRE/County Fire on large incidents. Name AMERICAN RED CROSS Address 225 Prado Road, Suite A, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone 24-hour: (805) 543-0696 Web URL www.slo-redcross.org Information The Red Cross can provide assistance to fire victims, people displaced due to a fire or other emergency, provide a large variety of disaster services, open and staff shelters/evacuation centers, provide incident personnel and victims with subsistence, provide cots and bedding, register victims, coordinate aid distribution and a variety of other numerous duties. Name ATASCADERO LOAVES & FISHES Address 5411 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422 Phone (805) 461-1504 or John Boyd (805) 462-3550 Web URL www.atascaderoloaves.org Resource Services 25 + Volunteers Resource Materials Food distribution site Name BESTCARE CENTRAL COAST HOME HEALTH Address 277 South St. #W, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 782-8600 Kris Waluszko (805) 782 -8600 ext. 119 E-mail: kwaluszko@wilshirehcs.org Web URL www.wilshirehcs.org Resource Services 28 RN’s/LVN’s 13 Physical Therapists/PTA’s 5 Occupational Therapists/COTA’s 3 HHA’s 2 Medical Social Worker 15 Administrative/Clerical Staff Can complete home visits for vulnerable population Can provide referral services Resource Materials Limited quantity of medical supplies (sterile/non-sterile dressings, catheter supplies, etc.). Main office in San Luis Obispo, with branch offices in Paso Robles and Santa Maria. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 64 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name CALIFORNIA SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION DISASTER RELIEF Phone Ernie Thompson (805) 929-6438 E-mail: ekthompson10@netzero.net Web URL www.csbc.com/disasterrelief Resource Services 3000+ volunteers state wide and 95,000 nationwide to provide: Mass feeding Clean up and recovery Long term recovery Resource Materials Have a local cleanup trailer. Can request following from Fresno if needed: Mobile kitchens Mobile medical unit Mobile shower unit Mobile dental unit Water purification equipment Communications equipment Name CATHOLIC CHARITIES CENTRAL COAST Address 3592 Broad St, Ste 104, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 541-9110 Alondra Ortiz: E-mail aortiz@catholiccharitiescentralcoast.org Web URL www.catholiccharitiesusa.org Resource Services Provide Immigration Service Referral Services for Housing Assistance Name COAST NATIONAL BANK Phone (805) 541-0400 Web URL www.coastnationalbank.com Resource Services Accept monetary donations in support of a local disaster. Funds to be disbursed to the Community Foundation for re-distribution. Staff personnel to assist as available. SLO office has 30 staff members. Resource Materials Branch locations for spontaneous volunteer processing centers, small group meetings, and office and communications support (phones, photocopies, office supplies, etc.). Locations include kitchenette and restrooms. SLO and AG are best suited for this purpose. SLO branch has multiple buildings, storage area and large parking lot. AG office has large parking lot. Name COMMUNITY ACTION PARTNERSHIP Phone (805) 544-4355 Grace McIntosh, Deputy Director: (805) 549-7675 E-mail: gmcintosh@capslo.org Web URL www.capslo.org Resource Services 70+ Staff Case management Child Care Weatherization services for low-income households Family support services for long term recovery Home repair services for long term recovery Resource Materials Homeless shelter and Prado Day Center SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 65 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF TEMPLETON Address 610 S Main St., Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-1921; FAX: (805) 434-0556 Primary Contact Richard Crawford: (805) 461-3955 – Disaster Coordinator Charlie Little E-mail: pastor@fpctempleton.org (Director) Web URL www.templetonpres.org Resource Services 10 Volunteer shelter support staff Resource Materials Shelter facility Name FIVE CITIES MEALS ON WHEELS Phone (805) 773-2053; FAX: (805) 773-4803 Primary Contact Richard Strachan Web URL Resource Services 25 Volunteers (22 of those are drivers) Chef and Assistant Chef able to prep food Resource Materials Food Services Name FOOD BANK COALITION OF SLO COUNTY Phone (805) 238-4664; FAX: (805) 238-6956 Primary Contact Wendy Lewis, Chief Operating Officer, (805) 235-0919 or Timothy Barker: (805) 235-1228 Web URL www.slofoodbank.org Resource Services 6 Staff during initial response period. 100 Or more available in recovery period. All knowledgeable of food distribution sites in their respective locals, Food Bank programs, food resource connections. Resource Materials Approximately 200,000 lbs. of food available for immediate distribution from two warehouses, Paso Robles and Oceano, to low-income families throughout the County. Fleet vehicles to deliver food to distribution sites, trained drivers – subject to road accessibility. Storage for 80,000 lbs. of refrigerated and frozen food at the Paso Robles warehouse. No generator onsite in case of power outage. Access to America’s Second Harvest Food Banks throughout the state and nation for emergency back-up. Access to California’s Emergency Food and Shelter Program assets delivered to SLO Co. and Federal food storage in a Presidential Disaster Declaration. Name GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY AND SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTIES Phone (831) 423-8611 – Corporate Office Primary Contact Jim Burke, Senior VP of Retail and Operations (805) 544-0542 E-mail: jburke@scgoodwill.org Web URL www.scgoodwill.org SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 66 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name GRACE BIBLE CHURCH Phone (805) 489-4200 Primary Contact Ben Youngkin, Youth Pastor E-mail: byongkin@gracevine.com Web URL www.gracevine.com Resource Services Spiritual counseling Possible kitchen crew of 6 workers Resource Materials Shelter facility Name HOMELESS ANIMAL RESCUE TEAM (HART) Phone (805) 927-7377; FAX: (805) 924-1970 Primary Contact After hours: Terry Hanson (805) 924-1478 or Susan Barghini (805) 927-5956-hm E-mail: susanbarghini@sbcglobal.net Web URL www.slohart.org Resource Services General volunteers to work with animals (50 core volunteers) Medical staff and assistants to administer animal meds Animal trappers Transporters Resource Materials Facility can be used as small animal shelter for 10+ animals. Name HORSE EMERGENCY EVACUATION TEAM (HEET) Phone (805) 466-7457 Primary Contact Chris Shell (805) 929-5337 Web URL www.sloheet.org Resource Services 30 Trained equestrian volunteers with additional training in ICS, equine triage, trailering, and human first-aid. Contacts with State Equine Emergency Network Veterinarian, local veterinarians, shelter facilities, feed stores and local horse associations. Resource Materials 2 Response trailers for field staging Evacuation and sheltering equipment Mobile Amateur Radio equipment Agreements with shelter facilities, including fairgrounds, horse boarding facilities and feed stores. Written procedures and forms Name HOSPICE OF SLO COUNTY Phone (805) 544-2266; FAX: (805) 544-6573 Primary Contact Kris Kington-Barker E-mail: kriskington@hospiceslo.org Web URL Resource Services Grief counseling for disaster/trauma victims and emergency responders. Grief awareness and education for the community. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 67 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Name HOSPICE PARTNERS OF CENTRAL COAST Phone (805) 782-8608; FAX: (805) 782-8614 Primary Contact Ingrid Pries(805) 269-0141 ext. 11 E-mail: ipires@wilshirehcs.org Web URL www.wilshirehcs.org Resource Services Five (5) Grief counselors with extensive training in critical incident stress response and disaster experience. Name LOAVES & FISHES (PASO) Address 2650 Spring St., Paso Robles, CA 93446 Mailing: PO Box 1720, Paso Robles, CA 93447-1720 Phone Interim Director: Michelle Karp (805) 512-1607 (cell); Kevin Conway: (310) 351-7803 (cell) or (805) 221-5840 (home) Web URL www.loavesandfishespaso.org Resource Services 25-50 Volunteers with skills to interview clients, and package food orders Resource Materials Food pantry Possible food distribution site (no cooking facilities) Large walk-in freezer and refrigeration units for pallets of food Possible collection site for donations Name LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN SERVICES OF SLO COUNTY Phone (805) 785-0132; FAX: (805) 785-0134 Primary Contact Karen Jones E-mail: karenjones@ombudsmanslo.org Web URL www.ombudsmanslo.org Resource Services ~25 Volunteers trained in advocacy and communication Resource Materials Satellite phone Name MEATHEAD MOVERS Phone (805) 544-6328; FAX: (805) 781-0872 Primary Contact Aaron Steed E-mail: aaron@meatheadmovers.com Web URL www.meatheadmovers.com Resource Services 10-40 Student athletes able to drive moving trucks and provide moving labor. Disaster donation coordination. Resource Materials Moving trucks. Camarillo office can also provide assistance. (~20 people and truck fleet) Name OLD MISSION Phone (805) 781-8220; FAX: (805) 781-8214 Primary Contact Fr.Russell Brown (805) 781-8220 ext. 25 or 26 E-mail: frrussell@oldmissionslo.org Web URL www.oldmissionslo.org Resource Services 4-5 Church members to service as volunteers Disaster donation coordination SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY RESOURCE DIRECTORY SLO County Office of Emergency Services 03/2015 Page 68 Please note: For Public Safety and Related Agencies Use Only Resource Materials Site suitable for sheltering Household goods Clothing banks Name SALVATION ARMY Address 815 Islay Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Phone (805) 544-2401 Information The Salvation Army can provide assistance in emergency food and clothing WATER Name AVILA BEACH COUNTY WATER DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 309 (191 San Miguel St.), Avila Beach, CA 93424 Phone (805) 595-2664 FAX:(805) 595- 7623 24hr: (805) 546-3618 Name CALIFORNIA VALLEY COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 3094 (13080 Soda Lake Road), California Valley, CA 93453 Phone (805) 475-2211; FAX: (805) 475-2758 Name CAMBRIA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 65 (1316 Tamsen Dr. #201), Cambria, CA 93428 Phone 24hr: (805) 927-6223; FAX: (805) 927-5584 Name CENTRAL COAST INDUSTRIES Address P.O. Box 2417 (2122 Hutton Road), Nipomo, CA 93444 Phone (805) 349-9980; (800) 633-6966; FAX: (805) 349-0471 24-hour: Brian Touey, (805) 896-3777; Shannon Touey (805) 896-7343 Or Veronica, (805) 896-4038 E-mail brian@ccirentals.com or Shannon@ccirentals.com Web URL www.ccirentals.com Information Portable toilets, showers, sinks, water truck, water services. Also listed under, Food, Water; Showers, Portable; and Toilets, Portable. Name COUNTY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT Address County Government Center, Room 206, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 Phone (805) 781-5252 Name GARDEN FARMS COMMUNITY WATER DISTRICT Phone 24hr: (805) 438-3751 Water District Office Marcia Joyce: (805) 441-3572 Name GOLDEN STATE WATER COMPANY Address 1140 Los Olivos, Los Osos, CA 93402 Phone (805) 528-1626; 24 hr. (800) 999-4033 Name NIPOMO COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT City San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory City of San Luis Obispo Resources Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 69 of 5 Address P.O. Box 326 (148 South Wilson St.), Nipomo, CA 93444-0326 Phone (805) 929-1133 / 1931; FAX: (805) 929-1932 Name OCEANO COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 599 (1665 Front St.), Oceano, CA 93445 Phone (805) 481-6730; FAX: (805) 481-6836 Lori Angello, Director: (805) 489-9766 Name PRO WATER EQUIPMENT RENTAL Address 20395 Somma Drive, Perris, CA 92570 Mailing: PO Box 78205 Corona, CA 92877 Phone (909) 720-2138 E-mail prowater113@aol.com Web URL www.prowaterequipment.com Information Has 8,000 & 10,000 gallon water wagons. Also listed under Water. Name SAN SIMEON ACRES COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address 111 Pico Avenue, San Simeon, CA 93452 Phone (805) 927-4778 or (805) 546-3612. (Ask to have on-call person paged). FAX: (805) 927-0399 Name TEMPLETON COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Address P.O. Box 780, Templeton, CA 93465 Phone (805) 434-4900 City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Persons with Access and Functional Needs Section 8 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 1 The Persons with Access and Functional Needs List is a confidential document the CANNOT be put into any Public Documents. The County of San Luis Obispo generates the Persons with Access and Functional Needs List on an annual basis and has an up to date database. The Persons with Access and Functional List is located with the Emergency Services Director or the Deputy Emergency Services Director. City San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Resource Directory Senior Care Facilities Section 9 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date For Official Use Only Page 1 of 1 The San Luis Obispo City Fire Department will provide a list of Senior Care Facilities withing the City to the Emergency Operations Center, when activated. City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan RECOVERY Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Prepared by: David L. Mathe Emergency Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 1 of 43 FORWARD The City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Recovery Plan addresses the City of San Luis Obispo's response to an emergency impacting the city. Recovery Response measures and procedures concerning the policy and operations of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Disaster Recovery Plan contained herein. Plan Adoption This is the official City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Recovery Plan. ____________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief San Luis Obispo Fire Department Date: City of San Luis Obispo Disaster Recovery Plan Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 2 of 43 Table of Contents Recovery Operations Section Page Plan Adoption 1 Table of Contents 2 I. Concept of Operations 4 A. Short Term Recovery 7 B. Long Term Recovery 7 C. Situation Reporting Zones 8 D. Damage Assessment 9 II. Recovery Operations Organization 10 III. Recovery Operations Responsibilities 11 A. Emergency Proclamations/Declarations 12 IV. Damage Recovery Assessment 13 A. Local Assistance Centers/Disaster Recovery 13 B. Public Assi stance through CalOES 15 C. Public Assistance through Other Agencies 16 D. Individual and Family Assistance 17 E. Businesses, Ranchers, and Private Non-Profit Assistance 18 V. Recovery Assistance 19 A. Public Assistance Categorized as Emergency or Permanent work 19 VI. Documentation 24 VII. Disaster Assistance Process for Public Agencies 26 A. Public Assistance Program Responsibilities 26 B. Project Worksheet 26 C. Work Project Funding 28 D. Completion Deadlines 28 E. Eligibility requirements 29 F. Contracts and Procurement 30 G. Emergency Procurement Procedures 31 H. Donated Resources 31 I. Project Closeout 31 J. Audits 31 K. Appeals 32 L. Post-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Grant Program 32 VII. Hazard Mitigation – Planning and Prevention 33 A. City of San Luis Obispo Local Hazard Mitigation Plan 33 B. Hazard Mitigation Grant Programs 33 City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 3 of 43 C. Hazard Mitigation Grant Process 34 D. Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 36 VIII. After Action/Improvement Report 37 Supporting Documents 38 • Recovery Unit Leader—Checklist 38 • Rapid Damage Estimate 40 • Initial Damage Assessment 41 • Damage Assessment Overview 42 Revision Page 43 City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 4 of 43 RECOVERY OPERATIONS I. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS “Disaster Recovery” is both short-term activities intended to return essential services to operation, and long-term activities designed to return infrastructure systems to pre-disaster conditions. Recovery activities are those necessary to restore services and systems to a state of normalcy. Short term recovery actions include damage and safety assessments and those necessary to return health and safety systems (e.g., water) and services (e.g., acute health care) to minimum operating standards. When conditions exist, which pose an extreme peril to life and property and is beyond the effective response capabilities of the City of San Luis Obispo, it may proclaim a local emergency and request that the state implement or coordinate financial disaster recovery programs. Recovery efforts can begin even while response efforts are underway. Such initial efforts may include beginning to restore utility services, clearing roadways of debris, and basic mitigation efforts to keep additional damage from happening. Initial coordination of recovery efforts, such as initial planning and response, is the responsibility of the City of San Luis Obispo. In the aftermath of a disaster initial recovery needs may include:  Assessment of the extent and severity of damages to homes and other property.  Restoration of services such as water, sewer, and power.  Repair of damaged homes and property.  Professional counseling, guidance and education due to the sudden changes resulting  from the emergency. Private sector entities can/should be utilized as needed to provide recovery assistance. Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with private entities can provide an effective method of mobilization and resource management. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 5 of 43 Recovery Activities Rebuilding efforts require decisions on several critical activities that have long-term social, economic and physical recovery implications. In addition to common emergency planning considerations (e.g., establishing partnerships, risk identification and reduction, plan maintenance including drills and exercises) local government should consider the activities listed below during the emergency management planning process. Physical Recovery Activities: Governmental Recovery Activities:  Preserving historical sites  Considering environmental concerns  Upgrading infrastructure and utilities  Removing debris and managing disposal sites  Evaluating redevelopment and subdivisions  Establishing restoration committee  Deferring permits, fees, etc.  Pursuing hazard mitigation projects and advancing mitigation efforts  Modifying land use and zoning requirements  Improving i nfrastructure, roads, housing  Evaluating repair and rebuilding options  Incorporating changes in construction standards  Continuing the performance of governmental functions  Protecting essential facilities, equipment, records, etc.  Managing donations  Coordinating Voluntary agencies  Building community consensus  Engaging stakeholders, special interest groups and the public in decision making processes  Pursuing new opportunities in community planning  Upgrading communication systems  Pursuing political support  Communicating recovery activities to the public  Addressing community questions about health consequences of the event Social Recovery Activities: Economic Recovery Activities:  Promoting community participation  Providing services for the mental health of individuals  Evaluating community stress  Informing the public of physiological considerations  Restoring community values  Promoting family individual preparedness  Establishing Local Assistance Centers of “one- stop” disaster recovery services  Establishing a documentation system to collect and store disaster-related cost information to ensure maximum state and federal reimbursement  Addressing economic loss of the community  Identifying available working capital  Promoting business in damaged areas  Maximizing the consumer base  Reestablishing commercial services  Facilitating business recovery  Securing disaster business loans, disaster recovery assistance grant and hazard mitigation project funding At the state level, the CalOES Disaster Assistance Division manages disaster recovery operations by aiding local governments and coordinating recovery programs for individuals and businesses impacted by disasters. The Disaster Assistance Division ensures that state and federal support are provided in an efficient and timely manner throughout the recovery process. CalOES is the grantee for federally funded disaster assistance programs, and grantor for the state California Disaster Assistance Act program. As City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 6 of 43 such, the Disaster Assistance Division coordinates recovery assistance for individuals, businesses and the agricultural community. Additionally, the Disaster Assistance Division oversees hazard mitigation activities throughout California and provides technical support to reduce the costs and streamline the process of future recovery efforts. In support of these responsibilities, the Disaster Assistance Division performs extensive planning activities with local, state and federal agencies, legislators, various volunteer and non-profit organizations. Accurate and current Initial Damage Estimates should be provided concurrently with requests for assistance by local jurisdictions. CalOES staff will work with the City of San Luis Obispo to ensure that accurate and current disaster information is captured within Response Information Management System. The Initial Damage Estimate provides information necessary for the Disaster Assistance Division to determine if state and/or federal disaster assistance is warranted and what external resources are needed. The information provided by local government should include: • Type and extent of public and private sector damage. • Basic repair and emergency response costs; and • Any acute public health issues. If the available Initial Damage Estimate information appears inaccurate based on the known magnitude of the event or if the information appears out-of -date, the Disaster Assistance Division staff may be required to verify the information, through the Preliminary Damage Assessment process outlined below. A Preliminary Damage Assessment may also be necessary to verify Initial Damage Estimate information as discussed above. A Preliminary Damage Assessment is a comprehensive report completed by a team of local, state and/or federal representatives in cooperation with the affected local government and the private sector. The representatives may include local public works staff, CalOES or the United States Small Business Administration program staff. The Preliminary Damage Assessment is used to determine the level of state and/or federal assistance required. Preliminary Damage Assessment information includes:  specific damaged sites, including facility type (e.g., school, road, private residence).  insurance and maintenance records of damaged facilities.  damage description and repair estimates; and  local government’s budget reports. If federal assistance is required, CalOES must submit a request to the President within 30 days of the disaster occurrence. The request must be accompanied by a joint CalOES/FEMA Preliminary Damage Assessment. Accordingly, CalOES will request FEMA’s assistance and complete the joint Preliminary Damage Assessment as soon after the event as practical. In special circumstances when the magnitude of the event warrants, the President may declare an emergency or major disaster prior to completion of a Preliminary Damage Assessment. However, a Preliminary Damage Assessment still requires completion in order to establish the level of financial assistance required by the state and federal governments. Consistent with the Standardized Emergency Management System, local government should provide all requests for disaster recovery assistance to the Operational Area. CalOES Regions are the first line City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 7 of 43 reviewers of requests for disaster assistance from local government. The CalOES Reg ion office may complete a “Local Proclamation” form utilizing the Response Information Management System database. This form includes the Regional Analysis, which the Disaster Assistance Division utilizes to evaluate the need and appropriate level of state and/or federal assistance warranted. The Disaster Assistance Division provides its recommendation to the CalOES director for approval. A. Short Term Recovery Short term recovery operations generally begin during the response phase of the emergency. The major objectives of short-term recovery operations include debris removal and cleanup, orderly and coordinated restoration of essential services (electricity, water, and sanitary systems), and assisting the City of San Luis Obispo’s population in coping with the emergency. The goal of short-term recovery is to restore City of San Luis Obispo and related services to at least a minimal capacity. Short term recovery may include:  Utility restoration.  Continued social, medical, and mental health services.  Re-establishment of city government operations.  Re-establish of transportation routes.  Debris removal.  Cleanup operations; and  Abatement and demolition of hazardous structures. For federally declared disasters, tele-registration centers may be established by the Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS/FEMA) to assist disaster victims and businesses in applying for grants, loans, and other benefits. In coordination with the American Red Cross, temporary services such as sheltering for disaster victims may be provided. The City of San Luis Obispo may need to ensure that debris removal and cleanup operations are expedited in public areas. Based on the City of San Luis Obispo’s assessments, structures that pose a public safety concern may be inspected by building officials or other professionals to determine specific damages. B. Long Term Recovery The major objectives of long-term recovery operations may include:  Improved land use planning.  Improved emergency planning.  Re-establishing the local economy to pre-disaster levels.  Recovery of disaster response costs.  Effective integration of Mitigation strategies into recovery planning and operations. The goal of long-term recovery is to restore facilities to pre-disaster condition. Long-term recovery includes hazard mitigation activities, restoration or reconstruction of public facilities, and disaster response cost recovery. Each affected jurisdiction is responsible for their own approach to mitigation, which could include zoning variances, building codes changes, plan reviews, land use planning techniques, and safety element review. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 8 of 43 With public safety a primary concern, rapid recovery may require adjustments to policies and procedures to streamline the recovery process. Any hazard mitigation actions may need to be coordinated between various agencies and jurisdictions in order to ensure a maximum reduction of vulnerability to future disasters. Long term recovery may also involve local jurisdictions restoring essential facilities to their pre-disaster condition by retrofitting, repairing or reconstructing them during recovery operations. Recovery programs will also be sought for individual citizens and private businesses. The City of San Luis Obispo will have a vital role to play in coordinating rebuilding efforts related to commercial areas of the City of San Luis Obispo. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 8 of 43 C. Situation Reporting Zones The City of San Luis Obispo has been organized into 4 Situation Reporting Zones (SRZ’s). They are described as follows: Zone 1: CENTRAL: is that area to the North of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, West of the Union Pacific railroad, South of Mill Street from Broad St. to Pepper Street and East of Highway 101 from Madonna Road to Broad Street. Zone 2: NORTH: Is that area to the North of Mill St. from Broad Street to Pepper Street and North of Monterey Street from Pepper Street to Fox Hollow Road exit off Highway 101. Zone 3: WEST: is that area that is West of Broad Street and South of the Intersection of S Higuera Street and Bridge St. Zone 4: EAST: is that area that is South of the intersection of Broad Street and Perkins Lane, East of the intersection of Tank Farm Road and Santa Fe Road and East of the Union Pacific railroad from the Meeting of Lawrence Drive and Garibaldi Avenue and South of Monterey Street Note: Where no damage occurs within a SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. Note: Where no damage occurs within a SRZ, “no damage” reports are still required in order to insure complete damage intelligence. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 9 of 43 D. Damage Assessments When requesting state or federal disaster assistance, the City of San Luis Obispo must provide information to support the request. The chart below describes the mechanisms required to document damages and determine needed assistance in the impacted area. Report Title Responsible Party Description Needed Purpose of Report Initial Damage Estimate¹ (IDE) Local jurisdiction Initial description of damage including: Type and extent of public and private sector damage Basic repair and emergency response costs Any acute public health issues Number of homes and businesses not insured or underinsured Provides information for CalOES to determine if state and/or federal disaster assistance is warranted and to what external resources are needed. An Initial Damage Estimate should be provided concurrently with request for assistance. Not providing this information promptly can delay assistance. Preliminary Damage Assessment (POA) Disaster Assistance Division field staff assisted by CalOES Regional staff, local, state and/or federal government staff Preliminary detailed damage report including:  Facility types (e.g. school, road, private residences) and location  Facility insurance and/or maintenance records.  Damage description and repair estimates  Local government budget reports  Destroyed/damaged residences, personal property, businesses  Any identified environmental or historical issues Provides information for CalOES to determine extent and type of state and/or federal disaster assistance. This information is also used by FEMA to prepare a regional analysis of the request for consideration by FEMA headquarters. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 10 of 43 II. RECOVERY OPERATIONS ORGANIZATION For the City of San Luis Obispo, initial recovery operations will be managed by the appropriate departments. Initial overall coordination of recovery efforts can be coordinated by CalOES. Throughout the recovery process, City of San Luis Obispo departments should also be represented and responsible for certain functions that may need or otherwise involve their expertise. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 11 of 43 III. RECOVERY OPERATIONS RESPONSIBILITIES The City of San Luis Obispo has specific responsibilities in recovering from a disaster, although the City of San Luis Obispo may not have all the resources necessary for recovery; state and/or federal disaster assistance may be needed. The organizational overview listed on the following page depicts a sampling of agencies that may be assigned or have the resources to coordinate specific disaster recovery operations for the City of San Luis Obispo. Function Lead Department Political process management; interdepartmental coordination; policy development; decision making; overall public information. Administration Land use and zoning variance; building and related permits; building and related safety inspections; redevelopment. Community Development Restoration facilities and related services Community Development Public area debris removal; demolition; roadway and related construction; restoration of county government public utility services. Public Works Assistance programs for victims and related special needs Community Development Public finance; budgeting; contracting; accounting. Finance Claims and liability issues City Attorney Coordination of applications for public agency disaster assistance; liaison with assistance providers; disaster financial assistance project management. Finance Advise on emergency authorities, actions, and associated liabilities; preparation of new ordinances and resolutions. Fire Department Government operations and restoration, including space acquisition, supplies, equipment, vehicles, personnel. Administration Geographic Information System (GIS) needs Information Technology City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 12 of 43 A. Emergency Proclamations / Declarations If the City of San Luis Obispo requires state or federal assistance, it is important to know if a local proclamation of an emergency is a prerequisite to obtaining the assistance. The chart below provides an overview of the programs discussed in this document and indicates proclamation/declaration requirements. Note: If a local emergency proclamation is required, it must be issued within 10 days of the event. Program Name Type of Assistance Local Proclamation Required? State of Emergency Required? Federal Declaration or Designation Required? Safety Assessment Program (SAP) Provides professional evaluators to determine safety, use and occupancy of homes and buildings. No No No Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) Reimbursement of emergency response costs for wildland urban interface fire suppression. No No Yes State Public Assistance Program under a CalOES Directors Concurrence Funding to restore public infrastructure. Yes No No State Public Assistance Program under a Governor’s proclamation of state of emergency Reimbursement of local emergency response costs, debris removal and funding to restore public infrastructure. Yes Yes No Federal Public Assistance Program (major disaster declaration) Reimbursement of local emergency response coast, debris removal and funding to restore public and allowable private-non-profit infrastructure. Yes Yes Yes Federal Public Assistance Program (emergency declaration) Reimbursement of local emergency response costs . Yes Yes Yes Individuals and Households Program Grants for unmet recovery needs to individuals and families. Yes Yes Yes State Supplemental Grant Program Supplemental grants for individuals for recovery may be available only when maximum Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Program has been reached. Yes Yes Yes United States Small Business Administration Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program Working capital loans for small businesses that have suffered an economic loss. No No Yes United States Small Business Administration Physical Disaster Loan Program Loans for individuals, families and businesses that have lost real and personal property. No No Yes US Department of Agriculture Disaster Designation Loans for farmers and ranchers for physical and crop production losses. No No Yes Crisis Counseling Programs Referral/resource services and short-term counseling for emotional and mental health problems caused by the disaster. Yes Yes Yes Disaster Unemployment Assistance Weekly unemployment benefits and job finding services due to a disaster. Yes Yes Yes City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 13 of 43 IV. DAMAGE RECOVERY ASSESSMENT The recovery damage/safety assessment function is the basis for determining the type and amount of state and/or federal financial assistance necessary for recovery. As soon as possible into an incident, even during the emergency response phase, initial damage estimates may be needed in order to support a request for a gubernatorial proclamation and for the state to request a presidential declaration. During the recovery phase, this assessment is refined to a more detailed level. Detailed damage/safety assessments will be needed to apply for various state and federal disaster financial assistance programs. In addition, a list of mitigation priorities will need to be developed by the jurisdictions’ departments. Determining which agency performs detailed damage and/or safety assessment will depend on what is being inspected and assessed. A. Local Assistance Centers/Disaster Recovery Centers a. Local Assistance Centers: Local government may consider activating Local Assistance Centers to provide a centralized location for services and resource referrals for the unmet needs of disaster victims. State funding may be available for eligible Local Assistance Center operations. Historically, Local Assistance Centers have proven to be a key factor for a successful recovery. Local Assistance Center characteristics generally include:  resource facility for recovery information, services and programs.  community-based service facilities.  managed by local government; and  staffed by private non-profit organizations, local, state and federal government, as appropriate. For additional information, contact CalOES for “A Guide for Establishing a Local Assistance Center.” b. Disaster Recovery Centers: Disaster Recovery Centers may also be activated by key federal agencies to provide convenient locations for victims and private non-profit organizations to obtain information about FEMA and United States Small Business Administration programs. Disaster Recovery Center characteristics general include:  Fixed or mobile resource facility for FEMA and United States Small Business Administration recovery information.  Managed by federal government; and  Staffed by FEMA, CalOES, United States Small Business Administration and other federal, state and local agencies as appropriate. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 14 of 43 c. Disaster Assistance Programs and their Requirements: The following tables are designed to provide local emergency manag ers a quick reference to disaster assistance programs administered or coordinated by the Disaster Assistance Division. The tables are grouped by potential recipients and indicate general program implementation criteria, including key deadlines. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 15 of 43 B. Public Assistance through CalOES The following table describes implementation criteria for the give main pubic disaster programs administered by CalOES: Director’s Concurrence, Governor’s Proclamation of a State Emergency, Fire Management Assistance Program, and Presidential Declaration of an Emergency and Presidential Declaration of a Major Disaster. Type of Assistance Program Name and Authority Cost Share Requirements Implementation Criteria Funding to restore damaged public infrastructure (e.g. roads, buildings, utilities). State Public Assistance CDDA-Director’s Concurrence with local emergency 75% State 25% Local Local agency must proclaim an emergency and request a “Director’s Concurrence” within 10 days of an event. A Governor’s proclamation of a state of emergency is not required for the CalOES Director to provide California Disaster Assistance Act funding to repair damaged public facilities. Reimbursement of local emergency response costs, debris removal, and funding to restore damaged public infrastructure. State Public Assistance California Disaster Assistance Act-Governor’s Proclamation of a State of Emergency 75% State 25% Local Local agency must proclaim an emergency and request the Governor to proclaim a state of emerg ency within 10 days of an event. The request should include dates of the event, an Initial Damage Estimate, areas affected, and appropriate type of assistance needed. Reimbursement for fire suppression costs. Fire Management Assistance Grant Stafford Act 75% Federal 25% Local Responsible fire agency must request Fire Management Assistance Grant assistance while the fire is still burning out of control. Neither local nor state emergency proclamations are necessary for the implementation of this program. Reimbursement of local emergency response and debris removal costs. Federal and State Public Assistance Stafford Act and California Disaster Assistance Act- Presidential Declaration of an Emergency 75% Federal 18.75% State 6.25% Local Local agency must proclaim an emergency and request the Governor to proclaim a state of emergency within 10 days of an event. The Governor has 5 days to request federal assistance. Local government should provide detailed information including dates of the event, an Initial Damage Estimate, area affected, appropriate type of assistance needed. Funding to restore public infrastructure* and reimbursement of emergency response and debris removal costs. Federal and State Public Assistance Stafford Act and California Disaster Assistance Act- Presidential Declaration of a Major Disaster 75% Federal 18.75% State 6.25% Local Local agency must proclaim an emergency and request the Governor to proclaim a state of emergency within 10 days of an event. The Governor has 30 days to request federal assi stance. Local government should provide detailed information including dates of the event, an Initial Damage Estimate, area affected, appropriate type of assistance needed *Funding beyond what is necessary to restore a facility may also be approved for hazard mitigation measures to ensure that future similar damage will not occur. These mitigation projects include cost effective improvement to the current design and capacity of the existing facility. Funding to provide crisis counseling services. FEMA Crisis Counseling Program Stafford Act 75% Federal 25% State This program is funded by FEMA and administered through the state Department of Mental Health. Benefits may be short- term or long-term (up to 0 months). City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 16 of 43 C. Public Assistance through Other Agencies The following table describes the implementation criteria for disaster assistance programs available to the City of San Luis Obispo through federal agencies other than FEMA. Through the California Disaster Assistance Act, the state may also cost share with these federal programs. Type of Assistance Program/Name/Lead Federal Agency and Authority Cost Share Requirements Implementation Criteria Watershed restoration Emergency Watershed Program/ Natural Resource Conservation Service, Division of the U. S. Department of Agriculture Section 216, P.L. 81/516 and Sections 403-405 P.L. 95-334 75% Natural Resource Conservation Service 18.75% State 6.25% Local Eligible activities include providing financial and technical assistance to remove debris from streams, protect destabilized stream banks, establish cover on critically eroding lands, repair conservation practices, and the purchase of flood plain easements. This program does not require a Presidential disaster declaration before it is implemented. However, for the sponsoring agency to be eligible for state cost share, the Governor must have proclaimed a state of emergency for the event. For additional information refer to: www.nrcs.usde.gov. Emergency flood and post-flood activities United States Army Corps of Engineers Emergency Operations Flood Control and Costal Emergencies Act (P.L. 84-99) 100% United States Army Corps of Engineers The United States Army Corps of Engineers may provide manpower, supplies, and equipment for flood-fighting, debris clearance and temporary levee repairs during the emergency period and up to a maximum of 10 days thereafter. This program does not require a Presidential disaster declaration before it is implemented. For additional information refer to: www.usace.army.mil. Restoration of publically sponsored flood control structures United States Army Corps of Engineers Rehabilitation Program Flood Control and Costal Emergencies Act (P.L. 84-99) 100% United States Army Corps of Engineers The United States Army Corps of Engineers Rehabilitation program aids with permanent repairs to federal system levees. Although the United States Army Corps of Engineers covers the repair costs, the local sponsoring agency may be required to purchase additional soil and must sign “Hold Harmless” agreements and other applicable assurances before work can begin. This program does not require a Presidential disaster declaration before it is implemented. For additional information refer to: www.usace.army.mil. Emergency repairs to federal roads and highways Federal Highways Administration Emergency Relief (ER) Program Title 23 U.S.C. Section 125 100% Federal Highways Administration, if performed within 180 days of an event This program may be implemented upon a Presidential Declaration or by special request from the Governor when a state of emergency has been proclaimed. The Federal Highways Administration ER program is administered through Caltrans. For additional information refer to: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/program admin/erelief.html. Permanent restoration of damaged federal highways Federal Highways Administration ER Program Title 23 U.S.C. Section 125 88.53% Federal Highways Administration 8.6% State 2.87% Local Federal Highways Administration funds 88.53% of repairs upon a Presidential Declaration or by special request from the Governor when a state of emergency has been proclaimed. The Federal Highways Administration program is administered through Caltrans in close coordination with CalOES. For additional information refer to: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/program admin/erelief.html. Long-term economic redevelopment United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Disaster Recovery Initiative Section 122 of the Housing and Community Act of 1974, as amended 75% Federal 18.75% State 6.25% Local Funds earmarked for certain United States Department of Housing and Urban Development projects may be transferred to emergency projects if not covered by FEMA and are in the best interest of the post-disaster-stricken community. California Department of Housing and Community Development administers this program. For additional information refer to http://www.hud.gov/office/cpd/community development/programs. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 17 of 43 D. Individual and Family Assistance The following table describes the implementation criteria for programs that are available to assist businesses, families and individuals, and private non-profit agencies in recovering from a disaster. Type of Assistance Program Name and Authority Loan/Grant Maximum* General Implementation Criteria Low interest loans for losses to real property (primary residences) which may include mitigation measures United States Small Business Administration Physical Disaster Loan Program 13 CFR Ch. 1 Part 123 $200,000 The United States Small Business Administration Physical loan program may be implemented upon a Presidential declaration of an emergency or major disaster. Victims are required to first seek loan assistance through the United States Small Business Administration before they can be considered for a federal grant through FEMA. The United States Small Business Administration also has the authority to independently (without a Presidential declaration) implement the program when at least 25 homes and/or businesses suffer 40% uninsured losses of their estimated fair market or pre-disaster fair market value, whichever is lower. In this case, a request for a United States Small Business Administration declaration must be requested through CalOES within 60 days of the occurrence. Low interest loans for losses to personal property United States Small Business Administration Physical Disaster Loan Program 13 CFR Ch. 1 Part 123 $40,000 Same as above Grants to cover temporary housing needs, home repairs, losses to personal property, transportation expenses, funeral and medical expenses, etc. Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Program Robert I. Stafford Act Disaster Relief and Assistance Act, 44 CFR Ch. 1 Part 206 Subpart D, Sect. 206.110 $25,600 This is a federal grant program managed and administered by FEMA upon a Presidential Declaration of an Emergency or Major Disaster. Victims who are found to be ineligible for a United States Small Business Administration loan are referred to FEMA’s Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Program. Grants to individuals and families that have received the maximum Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Program grant but still have unmet needs. State Supplemental Grant Program California Department of Social Services W/I 13600- 13601 $10,000 This program is administered through the state Department of Social Services. It is only implemented when FEMA has activated the Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Program. The state has no authority to activate the State Supplemental Grant Program independent of a federal declaration. Disaster Unemployment Assistance U. S. Department of Labor 20 CFR, Part 625 44CFR, part 206.141 N/A This program may be implemented by the Department of Labor upon a Presidential declaration. It allows those unemployed due to a disaster up to 26 weeks of unemployment benefits. *Loan/Grant amounts are adjusted annually in March. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 18 of 43 E. Businesses, Ranchers and Private Non-Profit Assistance The following table describes the implementation criteria of programs that are available to assist businesses, ranchers and private non-profit agencies in recovering from a disaster. Type of Assistance Program Name and Authority Loan Maximum* Implementation Criteria Low interest loans to businesses and private non-profit organizations for losses to real property. United States Small Business Administration Physical Disaster Load Program 13 CFR Ch. 1 Part 123 $1.5 Million The United States Small Business Administration Physical loan program may be implemented upon a Presidential declaration of an emergency or major disaster. The United States Small Business Administration also has the authority to independently implement the program when at least 25 homes and/or 3 businesses have suffered 40% uninsured losses due to a disaster. Typically, when the United States Small Business Administration declares a disaster for a county, contiguous counties are also eligible. Low interest loans to businesses and to help cover working capital. United States Small Business Administration Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program 13 CFR Ch. 1 Part 123 $1.5 Million The United States Small Business Administration also has the auth ority to independently implement the program with certification by the CalOES Director that at least five small business concerns in a disaster area have suffered economic injury and need financial assistance not otherwise reasonably available. The SMA may provide economic injury assistance for a disaster determined by the Secretary of Agriculture. Under these designations, the United States Small Business Administration makes economic injury assistance available to eligible small businesses. Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program loans become available under all United States Small Business Administration physical declarations. The maximum United States Small Business Administration loan assistance is $1.5 Million, whether it is a Physical Disaster Loan, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program loan, or a combination of both programs. Low interest loans to farmers, ranchers and aqua culturists for physical and/or crop production losses resulting from an unusual natural occurrence (weather pattern, pest, etc.). Secretary Designation- Agriculture Disaster U. S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Services Agency 7 CFR, Ch 18, part 1945, Subpart A $500,000 Emergency loans are made to farmers and ranchers who have suffered at least a 30% loss in crop production or a physical loss to livestock products, real estate, or chattel property. The Secretary of Agriculture can implement this program when requested by CalOES on behalf of a local agricultural commissioner or local government authority or implemented automatically when the President declares a major disaster or emergency. When requested on its own authority, supporting documentation to the types of crops and level of damage must be submitted. A proclamation of local or state emergency is not required for this program. *Amounts are adjusted annually based on the consumer price index. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 19 of 43 V. RECOVERY ASSISTANCE City of San Luis Obispo’s Responsibilities: When disaster strikes and damages exceed the City of San Luis Obispo’s capabilities, the City of San Luis Obispo may request state and/or federal disaster assistance. Determine if a local proclamation of an emergency is a prerequisite for the assistance requested. If a request for assistance is necessary, the City of San Luis Obispo should:  Include the following information in the request: 1. Copy of the local proclamation (if required) 2. Initial Damage Estimate 3. Written request/resolution by designated official 4. Type of disaster 5. Date of occurrence and whether situation is continuing 6. Areas affected 7. Type of assistance needed  Submit the request to: 1. Operational Area 2. CalOES REOC/Regional Office  Submit the request by the deadlines mentioned in the previous tables. A. Public Assistance is categorized as emergency work or permanent work: Category A – Debris Removal (Emergency Work) All expenditures associated with the removal of debris from public property. This can possibly include the pre-approved removal of private/personal property that has been moved to the right of way under the direction of the jurisdiction. If force labor is used, only overtime hours are eligible for reimbursement. Reimbursement may be available for temporary workers designated to disaster work. All jurisdictional and rental equipment hours (regardless of whether the operator was on regular time or overtime), materials and contract costs are eligible for reimbursement. Category Designation Type of work Emergency A Debris removal on public property B Emergency protective measures Permanent C Roads and Bridges D Water control facilities, levees, flood channels E Buildings and equipment (public property) F Utilities G Parks, recreational facilities, beaches, etc City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 20 of 43 Category B – Protective Measures (Emergency Work) All expenditures associated with emergency response, including, but not limited to:  Traffic control,  Public information activities,  Fire and rescue response,  Safety assessments,  EOC operations (including meals),  Sandbagging,  Patrolling flood control facilities Generally, Category B measures are those temporary measures designed to remove or reduce immediate threats to public property or protect it from further damage. If force labor is used, only overtime hours are eligible for reimbursement. Reimbursement may be available for temporary workers designated to disaster work. All jurisdictional and rental equipment hours (regardless of whether the operator was on regular time or overtime), materials and contract costs are eligible for reimbursement. Category C – Roads and Bridges (Permanent Work) All expenditures associated with street, road, bridge or sidewalk repairs. This includes, but is not limited to  Street signs,  Traffic lights,  Curbs and gutters,  Roadways (paved and unpaved),  Bridges,  Manhole covers,  Embankments and other roadway related structures. Regular and overtime hours as well as benefit costs of jurisdictional employees involved with Category C work are eligible costs. All jurisdictional and rental equipment hours, materials and contract costs are eligible for reimbursement as well. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 21 of 43 Category D – Water Control Facilities (Permanent Work) All expenditures associated with flood control, drainage or irrigation facilities owned and maintained by the jurisdiction. This includes, but is not limited to:  Storm drains,  Dams, debris  Basins,  Dikes,  Levees,  Flood gates,  Flood control channels. Regular and overtime hours as well as benefit costs of jurisdictional employees involved with Category D work are eligible costs. All jurisdictional and rental equipment hours, materials and contract costs are eligible for reimbursement as well. Category E – Public Buildings and Equipment (Permanent Work) All expenditures associated with public buildings and related equipment owned or maintained by the jurisdiction. This includes, but is not limited to:  Local government buildings,  Leased buildings where the jurisdiction is contractually required to maintain them,  Park and recreation buildings,  Office equipment,  Supplies lost in a disaster,  Library books,  Vehicles,  Specialized equipment and radios. Regular and overtime hours as well as benefit costs of jurisdictional employees involved with Category E work are eligible costs. All jurisdictional and rental equipment hours, materials and contract costs are eligible for reimbursement as well. Category F – Public Utilities (Permanent Work) All expenditures associated with water, power and sewage systems. This includes, but is not limited to:  Water and sewage treatment facilities,  Distribution systems and supplies. Regular and overtime hours as well as benefit costs of jurisdictional employees involved with Category F work are eligible costs. All jurisdictional and rental equipment hours, materials and contract costs are eligible for reimbursement as well. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 22 of 43 Category G – Parks, Recreation Facilities and Other (Permanent Work) All expenditures associated with parks, recreation facilities (not buildings) and facilities not included with the other categories. This includes, but is not limited to:  Parks,  Playgrounds,  Docks,  Swimming pools,  Picnic areas and tables. This category is also used to document damage for facilities not included in other categories. Regular and overtime hours as well as benefit costs of jurisdictional employees involved with Category G work are eligible costs. All jurisdictional and rental equipment hours, materials and contract costs are eligible for reimbursement as well. CalOES Responsibilities: If a request for assistance is submitted, CalOES will:  Review the request for completeness.  Request additional information if necessary.  Determine the need to c onduct damage assessments; and  Decide regarding the level of appropriate disaster assistance for the request. B. Public Assistance: Application Process: • Applicant Briefings Whether a disaster has been designated as a Director’s Concurrence, a State of Emergency Proclamation, a Presidential declaration of an emergency or a Presidential declaration of a major disaster, the Disaster Assistance Division will schedule and hold Public Agency Applicant Briefings. Affected public agencies will be notified by letter, e-mail, CalOES website, CalOES regional offices, or by telephone of the date, location, and time of the briefing. Applications for federal and state public assistance will be available and accepted during these briefings. Detailed instructions on applicant eligibility, project eligibility, eligible costs, program criteria, documentation requirements and important deadlines for work completion will also be explained. Public assistance applicants are assigned a primary point of contact that will process the Public Assistance application, monitor work progress, and provide technical assistance for the duration of the application. Once a public agency has been assigned a federal/state identification number, they are referred to as a “sub grantee.” • Kickoff Meeting Once the Request for Public Assistanceis reviewed and the applicant is deemed to be eligible for Public Assistance, a Public Assistance Coordinator (PAC) will contact the applicant to set up a Kickoff Meeting to discuss damages, needs assessment, and an action plan for completion of a Project City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 23 of 43 Worksheet (Form 90-91). The Public Assistance Coordinator (PAC) will go over what is expected of each applicant and will provide detailed instructions on what to do and how to do it. A state liaison will provide state specific details on Public Assistance program documentation and reporting requirements. Along with a list of damaged locations and documentation of emergency-related expenditures to date, applicants should also be prepared to discuss known historical or environmental issues for the location and general area. Copies of insurance documentation associated with any damaged facility should also be provided to FEMA during the meeting. • Project Approval Process The Disaster Assistance Division encourages sub grantees to participate fully in the decision- making process of the approved scope of work and cost estimation for each project. Sub grantees are notified by mail when FEMA or the state has approved the project for funding. This notification includes instructions to request payment of the funds. Additional information regarding both federal and state public assistance programs can be obtained through the Disaster Assistance Division’s Public Assistance Training Program. • Expedited Funding Upon a Presidential declaration, the City of San Luis Obispo has incurred significant emergency response costs and may request the expedited processing of state and federal funding. Qualifying costs may include:  emergency costs (e.g. police and fire overtime salaries).  debris removal necessary to protect life and property; and  temporary shelter operating costs. • Public Assistance Process Cycle Timeline Disaster Assistance Step Timeframe for Completion Initial Damage Estimate Within 10 days to Cal OES (sooner to County OES) Preliminary Damage Assessment Within two weeks to verify IDE Governor’s Request Within 30 days to the end of the incident Presidential Declaration Received back within 1 to 8 weeks Applicant’s Briefing Within 30 days of the Presidential Declaration Submission of Request for Public Assistance Within 30 days of the Presidential Declaration Kick off Meeting Within 21 days of approval of RPA. This meeting starts 60-day clock to report all damages City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 24 of 43 C. Individual Assistance: Application Process • Individuals and Households Program Upon the implementation of the Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Program, individuals are required to first telephone register with FEMA. Widespread notice through the local media and or websites maintained by local government, the United States Small Business Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, FEMA or CalOES inform the public of the toll-free tele-registration number. Websites and/or local media are also resources for physical locations of local United States Small Business Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Local Assistance Center or Disaster Recovery Center offices. Upon teleregistration, FEMA will assign a representative to evaluate the claim and will refer the individual to the appropriate program for loan and/or grant assistance. Individuals will then be provided loan and/or grant application information, instructions, terms and conditions directly from the agency aiding (FEMA, United States Small Business Administration, and United States Department of Agriculture). D. United States Small Business Administration and United States Department of Agriculture When the United States Small Business Administration and/or United States Department of Agriculture has implemented its disaster program(s) independent of a Presidential declaration, individuals, businesses, private non-profit agencies, and/or the agricultural community, will be instructed to file an application directly with their local United States Small Business Administration and/or United States Department of Agriculture office. VI. DOCUMENTATION Documentation is key to recovering eligible emergency response and recovery costs. Damage assessment documentation will be critical in establishing the basis for eligibility of disaster assistance programs. Under the California Disaster Assistance Act, documentation is required for damage sustained to the public and related resources, such as:  Public buildings.  Levees.  Flood control works.  Irrigation works.  County roads.  City streets.  Bridges; and  Other public works. Under federal disaster assistance programs, documentation must be obtained regarding damages sustained to resources such as: City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 25 of 43  Roads.  Water control facilities.  Public buildings and related equipment.  Public utilities.  Facilities under construction.  Recreational and park facilities.  Educational institutions; and  Certain private non-profit facilities. Documentation items can include any and/or all of the following:  receipts,  photos,  written summaries,  deadline dates and information,  GPS coordinates, if relevant,  and any other information that might be deemed helpful. Debris removal and emergency response costs incurred by the affected entities should also be documented for potential cost recovery through state and federal programs. The documenting information should include the location and extent of damage, and estimates of costs for: debris removal, emergency work, and repairing or replacing damaged facilities to a non-vulnerable and mitigated condition. The cost of compliance with building codes for new construction, repair, and restoration should also be documented. The cost of improving facilities may be provided in cost estimates for possible federal mitigation program funding. Documentation is a key to recovering expenditures related to emergency response and recovery operations. For the City of San Luis Obispo documentation should begin at the field response level and continue throughout the operation of their Emergency Operations Center and/or other emergency management coordination efforts or functions as the disaster unfolds. The City of San Luis Obispo has the responsibility for completion and submittal of the required documents for both state and federal assistance programs. The City is encouraged to develop documentation protocols that can meet both ongoing community requirements and provide enough documentation to justify claims for Cal OES, FEMA and insurance. For example, the development of fund codes within the accounting and budget processes that relate to FEMA eligibility requirements is encouraged. This way, eligible overtime and other expenses can be documented separately from day to day costs. Focus should be placed on ensuring that information about where work occurred, what equipment was utilized, and how the time and work effort was related to the disaster event is documented and maintained. If the event does end up in a federal declaration, eligible overtime and emergency expenditures are easily separated and justified for eligible activities and work sites. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 26 of 43 VII. DISASTER ASSISTANCE PROCESS FOR PUBLIC AGENCIES The assistance process for individual assistance naturally requires that people in need of assistance register directly with recovery agencies, such as FEMA. Information on how to do so is provided after a disaster for which recovery and other assistance is available. For the City of San Luis Obispo, there is a specific process in place to begin and go through the recovery process which of course differs from the individual assistance programs. A. Public Assistance Program Responsibilities The City of San Luis Obispo has the responsibility for completion and submittal of the required documents for both state and federal public assistance programs (note that the term “public” in this context refers to public agencies verses individuals. Assistance for individuals is generally referred to as "individual assistance". Overviews of certain individual assistance programs are contained later in this part of the EMP). The San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services (OES) is the primary agency for coordinating the initial completion of the public assistance program applications and supporting materials for County government. County OES may also serve as the initial primary contact for state and federal field representatives. The City of San Luis Obispo emergency management representatives complete the application process and provide supporting materials to state and federal representatives for their jurisdictions. The City of San Luis Obispo may assign a representative from their departments to complete application materials and initially coordinate with state and federal representatives. B. Project Worksheet Once the County OES Project Application is received, a joint state/federal inspection team may come into the requesting jurisdiction to perform a Project Worksheet. The Project Worksheet identifies the scope of work and the quantitative estimate of cost of each work project. The inspection team prepares a Project Worksheet data sheet for each project listed on the List of Projects. A project means all work performed at a single site. Any damage not shown to the inspection team during its initial visit must be reported to the DHS/FEMA Region IX Director, through the Governor's Authorized Representative (GAR), within 60 days following the completion of the initial visit. Within 45 days of receipt of the application for federal public assistance, the Project Worksheets are reviewed by DHS/FEMA and a decision to obligate the funds will be rendered. Once the projects are approved, CalOES must submit quarterly progress reports to DHS/FEMA. Supplements to the original application may be approved for substantial errors or omissions, overruns/under runs caused by variations in unit prices (cost adjustments) and changed site conditions/scope adjustments. Changes to small projects will normally be adjusted at the time of final inspection or an offsetting procedure will be implemented. Supplements should be requested at the earliest possible time and prior to completion of the work in question. Requests for a change in scope must be filed prior to work commencement on a "Damage Verification Form." If the City of San Luis Obispo does not agree with the inspection team's estimate, the City of San Luis Obispo may indicate its non-concurrence with the Project Worksheet. In addition to indicating non- City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 27 of 43 concurrence on the Project Worksheet form, the City of San Luis Obispo may also submit a letter of non- concurrence to CalOES. In this letter, include the reasons why the City of San Luis Obispo disagrees with the inspection team's estimate. Provide as much supporting documentation as possible. CalOES will generally recommend that DHS/FEMA review the Project Worksheet to reinstate eligible costs before the Project Worksheet is approved. The letter to CalOES should include the disaster number, the City of San Luis Obispo’s federal Project Application Number (PA Number), and the Project Worksheet number(s). For tracking and accounting purposes, projects are classified as either "small projects" or "large projects." A large project is a project above a certain approved estimate of costs; contact CalOES for the maximum amount used to delineate a large project from a small project. Once the Cal OES Project Application is received, a joint state/federal inspection team may come into the requesting jurisdiction to perform a Project Worksheet 90-91 (PW) ). The Project Worksheet is also referred to as the 90-91. The Project Worksheet 90-91 (PW) identifies the scope of work and the quantitative estimate of cost of each work project. The inspection team prepares a Project Worksheet 90-91 (PW) data sheet for each project listed on the List of Projects. A project means all work performed at a single site; this can also include grouping, for example, a short stretch of roadway with multiple sites into one project. Beginning in Fiscal Year 2017, local jurisdictions began working directly with FEMA on their Project Worksheet 90-91 Project Worksheet (PW) ) following the joint inspection team visit, instead of solely through CalOES. Any damage not shown to the inspection team during its initial visit must be reported to the DHS/FEMA Region IX Director, through the Governor's Authorized Representative (GAR), within 60 days following the completion of the initial visit. Within 45 days of receipt of the application for federal public assistance, the Project Worksheet (PW) s are reviewed by DHS/FEMA and a decision to obligate the funds will be rendered. Once the projects are approved, Cal OES, with input from local applicants, must submit quarterly progress reports to DHS/FEMA. Supplements to the original application may be approved for substantial errors or omissions, overruns/under runs caused by variations in unit prices (cost adjustments), and changed site conditions/scope adjustments. Changes to small projects will normally be adjusted at the time of final inspection or an offsetting procedure will be implemented. Supplements should be requested at the earliest possible time and prior to completion of the work in question. Requests for a change in scope must be filed prior to work commencement on a "Damage Verification Form." If the City does not agree with the inspection team's estimate, the jurisdiction may indicate its non- concurrence with the Project Worksheet 90-91 (PW) ). In addition to indicating non-concurrence on the Project Worksheet (PW) form, the jurisdiction may also submit a letter of non-concurrence to Cal OES. In this letter, include the reasons the jurisdictions disagrees with the inspection team's estimate. Provide as much supporting documentation as possible. Cal OES will generally recommend that DHS/FEMA review the Project Worksheet (PW) to reinstate eligible costs before the Project Worksheet (PW) is approved. The letter to Cal OES should include the disaster number, the San Luis Obispo County's Federal Project Application Number (PA Number), and the Project Worksheet 90-91 (PW). It is very important to review the Project Worksheet 90-91 (PW) very carefully to ensure concurrence, as a project approval can’t easily be changed once concurrence has occurred. Note: This process can take substantially longer than 45 days if FEMA and City disagree about damages and/or what is considered to return something to its pre-existing condition. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 28 of 43 For tracking and accounting purposes, projects are classified as either "small projects" or "large projects." A large project is a project above a certain approved estimate of costs. As of Fiscal Year 2018, any project with a cost of $125,500 or more was a figure used on a federal disaster to designate a large project from a small project. This figure may change from year to year. “Close-by” damages of the same nature may be consolidated into one Project Worksheet, so reporting any amount of damage deemed feasible to report should be included in any damage assessment cost estimate. Since for purposes of state and Federal disaster damage assessment and recovery all jurisdictions within the Operational Area will be totaled by FEMA, Cal OES, or other Federal or State disaster agency, as many costs as possible should be reported, as it will assist in reaching reimbursement thresholds. FEMA may also decide to combine “like” projects into a single Project Worksheet90-91 (PW) . If a site / project is deemed ineligible by Cal OES or FEMA, but believed to be eligible by the City, a, Project Worksheet with zero cost should be created so that the decision can be appealed later. For large projects over a certain cost, a construction monitoring program must be implemented. C. Work Project Funding To receive payment, the sub-grantee (City of San Luis Obispo) must have a resolution that designates an authorized representative, filed a CalOES Project Application, and have a Vendor Data Record. Work project funding is subject to DHS/FEMA/State Agreement and 75 %/25 % federal/state and local costs shares, as established as the minimum under the Stafford Act. Funding of improved projects is subject to the Governor's Authorized Representative's (GAR) approval. • Project Thresholds FEMA establishes a minimum project threshold for each fiscal year. The threshold applies to incidents declared in that fiscal year. As of Fiscal Year 2018, the minimum amount of damages for which FEMA will process a Project Worksheet is $3,140. However, any reportable damage and estimated costs can be helpful in determining if damages sustained throughout the City,and will reach the level necessary to obtain State or Federal disaster assistance. Payments for administrative allowances and small projects are automatic advance payments (after supplement approval). Payments for large projects must be requested on a "Request for Reimbursement" form. Reimbursement payments are sent in the form of progress payments, with 25 % usually withheld until after final inspection or audit. D. Completion Deadlines The following deadlines have been established for each work category: Debris Clearance 6 Months* Emergency Work 6 Months* Permanent Work 18 Months* * Dates established from date of major disaster declaration. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 29 of 43 The Governor's Authorized Representative may extend deadlines, when justified, as follows: Debris Clearance 6 Months Emergency Work 6 Months Permanent Work 30 Months DHS/FEMA may extend the deadline beyond these dates, with adequate justification. Costs are allowed only to date of last approved time extension. E. Eligibility Requirements • Replacement versus Repair The question of whether an eligible facility is damaged to the point where the applicant thinks the facility should be replaced rather than repaired, FEMA applies a “50% Rule” to determine the eligibility of replacement as opposed to repair work. The 50% Rule is summarized as follows: If the Repair Cost divided by the Replacement Cost is less than 50 percent, then only the repair cost is eligible. If the Repair Cost divided by the Replacement Cost is greater than 50 percent, then the replacement cost is eligible. Repair cost equals the cost of repair of damaged components only. The cost does not include eligible codes and standards upgrades, demolition, site work, or applicable project management costs. Replacement cost equals the cost of reconstructing the facility and includes current codes and standards upgrades. • Eligible Work: Must be a direct result of the disaster Must be in a designated disaster area Must be the legal responsibility of an eligible applicant Work can be deemed ineligible if there is found to be an applicant negligence, deferred maintenance or pre-existing damage. It is important for eligible applicants to ensure that routine maintenance is taken care of and documented in advance of a disaster. Applicants are responsible for obtaining all necessary state and federal permits and should not begin work until FEMA has completed any necessary environmental or historic review processes. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 30 of 43 • Eligible Costs: All costs associated with recovery must be reasonable and necessary. Costs must also comply with state and local procurement standards and not be contingent above state and/or federal funding. It is imperative to track all costs, even if you do not believe them to be reimbursable. Overtime and associated wage additive costs for emergency response personnel. Regular work hours for permanent work. Actual travel and per diem. Supplies, materials, and equipment (including rental). Repair, permanent restoration, and replacement costs for public facilities. The cost of basic engineering services when necessary for construction projects. Indirect and administrative costs (10% of total approved state share). Costs for work performed under interagency assistance agreements for which an eligible applicant is legally obligated to pay; and The local cost share required under federal public assistance programs is typically 25%. However, the 25% share may be partially offset by State disaster recovery funds if a State emergency proclamation is made and allows for such funding. This can equate into the federal share of 75% being paid and, if State funding is authorized, the state paying 75% of the remaining 25%. If federal pays 75% and state pays 75% of the remaining 25% that equates to the local share typically being about 6.25%. F. Contracts and Procurement An important area to note regarding eligible costs is contracts and procurement. It is vitally important that jurisdictions follow federal and local procurement standards and competitively bid emergency work (more stringent of the standards must be followed). Specifically, time and materials contracts should be avoided, particularly once an incident passes the 70- hour mark. The following documents should be retained for audit purposes on all contracts: Contract. Requests for bids, proposals or quotes. Bid documents/specs. Bid advertisement. List of bidders; and Invoices, cancelled checks, purchase orders, and inspection records. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 31 of 43 G. Emergency Procurement Procedures One way local jurisdictions can meet FEMA procurement requirements is by creating specific emergency procurement procedures that address rapid acquisitions, as well as more competitive acquisitions, when time allows. By establishing processes and expectations ahead of time to ensure that competitive acquisition processes are implemented as soon as practicable, it will help avoid problems with FEMA reimbursement. H. Donated Resources: In Presidentially declared disasters, donated resources applied to actual eligible emergency work such as debris removal or the filling and placing of sandbags are eligible to offset the 25% State and local cost share for emergency work (Categories A and B). However, resources or materials provided by a Federal agency cannot be credited. The donated services must be documented by written record and must include a description of work and record of hours worked by work site. Volunteer labor will be valued at the same hourly labor rate as a jurisdiction employee performing similar work. If the jurisdiction does not have employees performing similar work, then the rate should be consistent with those ordinarily performing the work in the same labor market. The value for donated equipment should be determined by using the applicable FEMA equipment rate and multiplying it by the number of hours the piece of equipment was used to perform eligible emergency work. Standby time is not eligible for credit. I. Project Closeout Project closeout occurs when the City certifies that all work has been completed. Large projects are closed out individually. Small projects are closed out together when the last project has been completed. The City should notify CountyOES immediately as each large project is completed and after completion of the last small project. Since small projects are paid up front, additional funding may be requested if the total sum of the small projects is greater than the amount that was paid up front. This request MUST be made within 180 days from the approved deadline of the last small project to be eligible. J. Audits There are three types of audits associated with FEMA based recovery funds: Capacity Audits – This audit is initiated within the first year of the disaster declaration date. Early Warning Audits – This audit is initiated midway through the project process. It may or may not include grants that already had Capacity Audits Traditional Audits – This audit is initiated after the applicant has completed all projects and FEMA has approved the final close-out. These audits are performed by the Federal Office of Inspector General (OIG). OIG cannot show up to audit you without representation from Cal OES or FEMA. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 32 of 43 These audits typically include costs related to the scope of work, procurement procedures, contract costs, labor, materials and equipment costs and duplicative recovery costs. The record retention requirement is generally three years beyond the time a local jurisdiction receives a Cal OES “audit waver” letter, however other regulations may require a longer retention period – work with your agency’s finance or audit staff on this issue when close out time arrives. If possible, as soon as audit regulations allow, records should be destroyed. This is because OIG can come back even after that point and request records for auditing; that is, if regulations allow records to be destroyed three years following CalOES or other official notice of project closeout and four years later OIG gives notice of an audit, if records still exist they must be given to the OIG. K. Appeals The appeals process is the opportunity for applicants to request reconsideration of decisions regarding the provision of assistance. The appeal must be filed with the State within 60 days of receipt of notice of the action or decision being appealed. The State will review the appeal and submit it to FEMA for consideration. The appeal can be done at two levels. The first level appeal is to the FEMA Regional Director. The second level appeal is to the Assistant Director at FEMA Headquarters. L. Post-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Overview: Administered by FEMA through CalOES, the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program provides grants following a disaster to state and local governments, Indian tribes, and certain non-profit organizations to develop plans and implement long-term hazard mitigation measures. Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Authority and Administration: The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program is authorized under Sections 322 and 404 of the Stafford Act. Federal funding becomes available only after the President signs a major disaster declaration. It is the only mitigation program that requires the local government to proclaim an emergency prior to implementation. The amount of funding available is based on a percentage of the federal share of the aggregate disaster costs for public and individual assistance. As manager of the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, CalOES is responsible for soliciting program interest, helping potential applicants develop applications, establishing deadlines for applications, providing technical assistance, establishing funding priorities and forwarding selected projects to FEMA for approval based on those priorities. CalOES posts grant applications instructions and deadlines on the website for a limited time following a federal declaration of a disaster. Sub-grantees are notified by mail when FEMA has approved the grant for funding. This notification includes instructions to request payment of the funds. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 33 of 43 VIII. HAZARD MITIGATION – PLANNING AND PREVENTION Hazard mitigation involves the ongoing identification of potential risks and hazards to the community, and development of effective pre-disaster mitigation strategies for the purpose of reducing potential impacts. Hazard mitigation planning is accomplished through advance planning and preparedness. Hazard mitigation is addressed through a variety of methods, many through the planning process. Hazard mitigation may also be accomplished through emergency planning by addressing threats and developing contingency plans for the threats. Additional mitigation occurs through ongoing prevention efforts, such as those coordinated through efforts such as public works flood control programs. A. City of San Luis Obispo Local Hazard Mitigation The City of San Luis Obispo is in the process of updating their Local Hazard Mitigation Plan. It is expected the DRAFT plan will be submitted to CalOES in calendar year 2019. B. Hazard Mitigation Grant Programs Hazard mitigation programs are what the name implies – programs intended to mitigate the effect of future disasters. Following a presidential disaster declaration, the federal Hazard Mitigation Grant Program is activated. The program's purpose is to fund projects which are cost effective and which substantially reduce the risk of future damage, hardship, loss, or suffering resulting from a major natural disaster. Grants are available to eligible applicants in the declared areas only and are delivered as either part of a Public Assistance grant or as a standalone measure. Mitigation projects must be cost effective and represent a solution to a problem. As of the date of this EMP, the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding amount is based upon a 15% share of the DHS/FEMA estimate of all Project Worksheets for public assistance work performed, and Individual Assistance costs. That is, if damages are estimated to be $1,000,000, $150,000 may also be made available for hazard mitigation. However, the hazard mitigation programs do change, thus the percentages and other requirements and conditions may change in future disasters. The federal contribution can be up to 75% of the cost of the hazard mitigation project approved for funding, with applicants providing matching funding through a combination of either state, local, or private resources. Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds cannot be used as the sole match for other federally funded programs. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 34 of 43 Two types of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Grants: The table below describes the two types of grants available under Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Grant Type Description Criteria Planning Seven (7) percent of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds may be used for planning and for the state to use for development of state, tribal and local mitigation plans. States that develop a comprehensive, enhanced mitigation plan are eligible for additional funds for mitigation projects. To receive funding a hazard mitigation plan must:  Identify the natural hazards, risks and vulnerabilities of areas in states, localities, and tribal areas.  Support development of local mitigation plans.  Provide for technical assistance to local tribal governments for mitigation planning.  Identify and prioritize mitigation actions that the State will support, as resources become available. Project The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program is a competitive program that funds cost-effective local and state mitigation measures. By regulation, Hazard Mitigation Grant Program projects must meet the minimum eligibility criteria, be consistent with the state and local hazard mitigation plans, and meet the guidelines and principles established for a disaster. To comply with the minimum eligibility criteria the project must:  Solve a problem independently or contribute to a solution where there is assurance the project will be completed.  Meet all applicable codes and standards.  Demonstrate cost-eff ectiveness.  Comply with federal requirements and regulations. C. Hazard Mitigation Grant Process Following each Presidential declaration of Emergency or Major Disaster, the Regional Director of DHS/FEMA and the Governor execute a document called the federal/state agreement. In past disasters, this Agreement includes appropriate provisions for hazard mitigation. Under the "typical paragraph" set out to serve this purpose, the state agrees to:  Evaluate or have the applicant evaluate the natural hazards in the disaster area and make appropriate recommendations to mitigate them.  Follow up with applicants to ensure that the appropriate hazard mitigation actions are taken.  Follow up with applicants to ensure that the appropriate hazard mitigation plan or plans are developed and submitted to the DHS/FEMA Regional Director for concurrence.  Review and update as necessary disaster mitigation portions of emergency plans. A Hazard Mitigation Coordinator (HMC) is appointed for the state and the City of San Luis Obispo. These individuals will constitute the Hazard Mitigation Team which will:  Identify significant hazards in the affected areas giving priority to disaster-related hazards.  Evaluate impacts of these hazards and measures which will mitigate their impacts. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 35 of 43  Recommend appropriate hazard mitigation measures. The Hazard Mitigation Team uses information from Project Worksheets, and visits to selected sites where significant damage has occurred. The state and City of San Luis Obispo representatives on the Hazard Mitigation Team are responsible for ensuring that there is adequate consultation among interested federal, state, and local parties. The Hazard Mitigation Team also prepares a Hazard Mitigation Plan which is submitted to the DHS/FEMA Regional Director through the Governor's Authorized Representative (GAR) within 180 days after a Presidential declaration. The objectives of the Plan are to:  Recommend hazard mitigation measures for local, state, and federal agencies.  Establish short-term and long-term planning frameworks for implementation of hazard mitigation efforts. Eligible applicants include state agencies, local governments, and private non-profit organizations which own or operate facilities providing essential government services. Essential government services include educational facilities, utilities, emergency services, medical services, custodial care, etc. Although Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds are based on a percentage of Public Assistance funding, awards are not limited to public projects, but must be sponsored by an eligible public entity. Most types of hazard mitigation projects are eligible, provided they meet basic project eligibility. The priorities of funding will be established by the CalOES. Eligible projects must be cost effective and substantially reduce the risk of future damage, hardship, loss, or suffering resulting from natural disasters. Eligible projects must: be consistent with the community's long-range hazard mitigation planning goals.  represent signifi cant risk if left unresolved.  address, when applicable, long-term changes to the areas and entities it protects, and have manageable future maintenance and modification requirements.  comply with all applicable codes and standards for the project local e.  have a direct beneficial impact upon the designated disaster area.  not fund personnel only - except for short-term projects which will result in long-term benefits.  not cost more than the anticipated value of the reduction in both direct damages and subsequent negative impacts were future disasters to occur.  provide solutions, rather than merely identify or analyze hazards, unless such constitutes a functional portion of a solution; and  provide the most practical, effective, and environmentally sound solution, given a well- considered range of options. Certain actions, policies and procedures are necessary for implementing Section 406 (Minimum Standards for Public and Private Structures) of the Federal Disaster Relief Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-288) following a Presidential declaration of Emergency or Major Disaster, which covers hazard mitigation. It also assigns hazard mitigation responsibilities to various elements of federal, state, and local governments in California. Section 406 of Public Law 93-288 requires, as a condition to receiving federal disaster aid, for repairs and reconstruction be done in accordance with applicable codes, specifications City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 36 of 43 and standards. It also requires that the state or local government recipient of federal aid evaluate the natural hazards of the area in which the aid is to be used, and take action to mitigate them, including safe land use and construction practices. D. Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 The Federal Emergency Management Agency's Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA 2000) requires that by November 2004 a local, approved hazard mitigation plan must be in place in order to receive Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds. Specifically, title 44 CFR Subpart 201.6 states "…a local government must have a mitigation plan approved pursuit to this section in order to receive Hazard Mitigation Grant Program project grants...."These plans must be submitted, via the state, to DHS/FEMA and approved by November 1, 2004.” City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 37 of 43 VIII. AFTER ACTION/IMPROVEMENT REPORT The National Incident Management System and the Standardized Emergency Management System regulations require any city, city and county, or county declaring a local emergency for which the Governor proclaims a State of Emergency, to complete and transmit an after-action report to OEM within 90 days of the close of the incident period. The after-action report will provide, at a minimum, the following:  response actions taken.  application of the National Incident Management System/Standardized Emergency Management System.  suggested modifications to National Incident Management System/Standardized Emergency Management System.  necessary modifications to plans and procedures.  training needs; and  recovery activities to date. The after-action report serves as a source for helping to document the City of San Luis Obispo’s emergency response activities and identifying areas of concern and success. It can also be utilized to develop a work plan for implementing improvements. An after-action report will be a composite document for all National Incident Management System/Standardized Emergency Management System levels, providing a broad perspective of the incident, referencing more detailed documents, and addressing all areas specified in the National Incident Management System/Standardized Emergency Management System regulations. It will include an overview of the incident, including enclosures, and will also address specific areas of the response, if necessary. It will be coordinated with, but not encompass, hazard mitigation. Hazard mitigation efforts may be included in the “recovery actions to date” portion of the after-action report. The San Luis Obispo City Manager will be responsible coordinating the completion of the City of San Luis Obispo’s after action reports which do fall under a specific discipline (such as fire, law enforcement, etc.) including forwarding it to the State Office of Emergency Services within the required 90 day period. County OEM and/or related agencies may coordinate with the City of San Luis Obispo in completion of the after-action report. Emergency managers for each affected Operational Area jurisdiction will be responsible for submitting the jurisdiction’s report to the CalOES Southern Region within the 90-day period. The reported may incorporate information from special districts. The City of San Luis Obispo’s after-action report’s primary audience will be public agency employees, including management. The after-action reports should be written in simple and brief language and geared to the primary audience. Data for the after-action report may be collected from sources such as questionnaires, Response Information Management System documents, other documents developed during the disaster response, and interviews of emergency responders. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 38 of 43 CHECKLIST – Recovery Unit Leader Short Term Recovery: Ensure the following actions are being completed: The initial actions for short term recovery center on accurate situational awareness and getting a recovery group organized. When there is a disaster event that is of such a magnitude that coordination efforts will be needed for recovery, implement the following actions:  Establish the Recovery Unit (part of Finance/Administration Section)  Have departments collect information on their ability to sustain agency operations.  Develop staffing pattern for the Recovery Operations Organization  Collect information from rapid damage assessment on damages, duration and impact from the following: o Utility Providers o Social, medical and health services o Transportation routes and services o Debris issues o San Luis Obispo County and city/special district government operations o Private sector retail and wholesale providers o Schools o Others  Develop initial short term and long term recovery objectives  Refer to hazard specific plans for information  Match short term recovery Operational Period with EOC Operational Period  Develop information for the public on the recovery process and progress  Develop a plan to assign personnel to sustain the recovery effort.  Coordinate with the Operational Area, other local jurisdictions and the State on their recovery efforts.  Begin developing a plan to transition from response to recovery. Long Term Recovery: Ensure the following actions are completed during long term recovery: As emergency issues are resolved and the community works to return to the new post disaster “normal”, the general priority is to continue accurate situational awareness and to sustain the recovery group operations. As the community transitions to long term recovery, implement the following actions:  Ensure sufficient and knowledgeable people are assigned to the Recovery Unit.  Continue to collect information on progress, duration and impact from the following: o Utility providers o Social, medical and health services o Transportation routes and services o Debris issues o San Luis Obispo County and city/special district government operations City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 39 of 43 o Private sector retail and wholesale providers o Schools o Others  Develop long term recovery objectives.  Determine appropriate Recovery Operational Period with Plans Section Coordinator.  Continue to coordinate with the Operational Area, adjacent counties and the state.  Seek regional coordination and solutions where appropriate.  Develop a group to develop the Community Recovery Plan.  Facilitate public involvement in the recovery process.  Look for public/private partnerships to strengthen recovery efforts.  Utilize mitigation plans for ways to build resiliency.  Establish work groups based either on geographic or function need.  Continue to provide information for the public on the recovery progress.  Coordinate recovery planning efforts with existing community general plans. Each department/agency should have a point of contact from their Finance Section who will be responsible for coordination of finance related activities to ensure cost recovery:  Ensure documentation of costs, including receipts, photos and relevant details.  When requested, provide copies of all financial documents or reports (pay sheets, checks, etc.) regarding damage and expenditures to the department/agency point of contact or Recovery Unit Leader.  Generate necessary financial reports such as payroll records .  Assist the department/agency point of contact or Recovery U nit Leader during any state or federal audits. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 40 of 43 Rapid Damage Estimate City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Department Location: Form Completed By: Date: Time: Type Minor Damage <30% Major Damage >30% Destroyed Single Family Dwelling Multi Family Dwelling Mobile Home Private Business Public Agency School Road Bridge *List number of buildings for each category. *Attach sample photos, if possible. Additional Information: City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 41 of 43 Initial Damage Assessment City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Department: Location: Date: Time: Time Address Damage Type Insurance Details Affected Minor Major Destroyed Private Public Yes No Affected Minor Major Destroyed Private Public Yes No Affected Minor Major Destroyed Private Public Yes No Affected Minor Major Destroyed Private Public Yes No The Initial Damage Estimate provides information for Cal OES to determine if state and/or federal disaster assistance is warranted and to what external resources are needed. An Initial Damage Estimate should be provided concurrently with request for assistance. Not providing this information promptly can delay assistance. An Initial Damage Estimate is completed by the City and forwarded to County OES for submittal to Cal OES. The Initial Damage Estimate should be completed on the form provided on Cal OES’s website at http://caloes.ca.gov/cal-oes-divisions/recovery/forms. The Initial Damage Estimate should provide reasonable estimates of the damage caused by the disaster. This documentation must be submitted to Cal OES within ten days of the end of the incident, but the sooner it is submitted the better. Local jurisdictions should submit their documentation to County OES within 48 hours, whenever possible. AFFECTED—Habitable. Structure is damaged but usable for its intended purposes. MINOR—Currently uninhabitable, Structure may be repaired and made safe in a short amount of time MAJOR—Currently uninhabitable. Structure received substantial damage and will take a considerable time to repair but is economically feasible to repair. DESTROYED—Permanently uninhabitable. Structure has received considerable damage and repair is not economically or technically feasible. City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 42 of 43 Damage Estimate Overview REPORT DATE: TIME: (24-Hrs.) JURISDICTION: DESCRIPTION TOTALS FISCAL TOTALS COMMENTS PERSONS: Dead Injured Displaced SUB-TOTAL: HOMES: Damaged or Destroyed: TOTAL DAMAGE ESTIMATE $ BUSINESSES-Destroyed: Large Small BUSINESSES-Damaged: Large Small SUB-TOTAL: AGRICULTURE: Acres Dairy Crops Orchard Nursery SUB-TOTAL: GOV’T LOSSES: Community Development Utilities Attorney Finance Administration Public Works Law Enforcement Recreation Fire Department SERVICES INTERUPTED: Communications Gas / Electricity Water SUB-TOTAL: TOTALS Private Homes $ Est. Public Businesses $ Est. Government Property $ Est. GRAND TOTAL $ $ 0 City of San Luis Obispo Recovery Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan ____________ For Official Use Only Page 43 of 43 REVISION PAGE This Section is for Plan Holders to record the posting of each Official Plan Revision’s made by the City of San Luis Obispo. Please enter the revision number, the pages, the date the revision was posted, and the name of the person posting the revision. Revision # Pages Changed Date Name City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center All Staff Checklist Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date All Staff Checklist Page 1 of 2 1. All EOC Staff 1. Position Description Responsible Party: All EOC Staff 2. Responsibilities: This checklist, including the following Activation, Operational and Deactivation Phase Activities, should be completed by all positions in the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Reference this and your position specific checklist (found later in this Section) in EOC activities. All EOC Staff Checklist Activation Phase  Ensure all pre-designated notifications are made.  Maintain a log of events and document all activities. ICS Form 214  Review position responsibilities and clarify any issues regarding your authority and assignment.  Verify contact information.  Determine potential issues for your Section or Branch based on the nature, scope and severity of the emergency.  Review applicable sections of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan.  Assess the status of your Section or Branch available resources.  Contact counterpart in the Operational Area EOC and establish lines of communication. Operational Phase  Refer all contacts with the media to the Public Information Officer (PIO).  Provide input to the Incident Action Plan (IAP), implement the objectives of your Section and monitor progress.  Report situation status and resource status to the Situation/Status Unit.  Maintain accurate records on the use of personnel, equipment and material and all other expenditures.  Ensure personnel are prepared for the possibility of continuous 24-hour operations.  Advise your Section Coordinator on issues affecting recovery. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Handbook All Staff Checklist Section 1 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date All Staff Checklist Page 2 of 2 Operational Phase (continued)  Participate in recovery planning and operations as needed and ensure requested activities do not pose a health threat to your Section or Branch emergency workers.  Brief your relief at shift change, ensuring that ongoing activities are identified, and follow-up requirements are known. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 1 of 16 2. COMMAND STAFF A. Description and Organizational Chart 1. The Command Staff consists of those responsible for the overall management of the emergency. This group includes the Emergency Services Director (City Manager), Deputy Emergency Services Director (Assistant City Manager) Command Group and Command Staff. The responsibilities of the Command Staff are: a. Manage EOC functions and coordinate the overall response/recovery effort, including prioritizing, decision-making, coordination, tasking, and conflict resolution within the EOC. b. Inform the Mayor and City Council. c. Report to State CalOES through the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC. d. Inter-jurisdictional coordination. e. Activation, including notification and recall, and deactivation of the EOC. f. Emergency public information dissemination. g. Provide information, expertise and advice to the Emergency Services Director and the Command group. 2. The Command Staff include Public Information Officer (PIO), Liaison Officer, Safety/Security Officer, and Legal Officer. Command Staff support is intended to provide information, expertise and advice to the Emergency Services Director and the Command Group. Some key responsibilities are: a. Emergency public information. b. Rumor Control and Public Inquiry. c. Legal counsel. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 2 of 16 3. The advisors participate in the EOC at the request of the Emergency Services Director. The following organizational chart details the Command Staff: Emergency Services Director City Manager Public Information Officer Liaison Officer Emergency Operations Center Safety and Security Officer EWEC Deputy ESD Assistant City Manager Deputy Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 3 of 16 B. Emergency Services Director 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Emergency Services Director Alternate: Assistant City Manager, or as appointed The Emergency Services Director directs emergency management operations. The Emergency Services Director also ensures contact is made and maintained with the San Luis Obispo County Operational Area EOC and the Incident Command Post (if activated). Additionally, the Emergency Services Director develops and maintains all jurisdictional plans and procedures pertaining to emergency response and recovery. 2. Responsibilities a. Establish the appropriate staffing level for the EOC and continuously monitor organizational effectiveness ensuring that appropriate modifications occur as required. b. Exercise overall management responsibility for the coordination between Emergency Response Agencies within the City of San Luis Obispo. Ensure that all jurisdiction agency actions are accomplished within the priorities established. c. Ensure that inter-agency coordination is accomplished effectively within the EOC. d. Declare, or request the declaration of, a Local Emergency in accordance with the jurisdiction’s policy as found in the Basic Plan Section of the City of San Luis Obispo’s Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan. Emergency Services Director Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Notify Mayor and City Council of incident and activation of EOC.  Ensure that Section Position Logs (ICS Form 214) and other necessary files are maintained.  Determine which sections are needed, assign Section Coordinators as appropriate and ensure they are staffing their sections as required. o Operations Section Coordinator o Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator o Logistics Section Coordinator o Finance/Administration Section Coordinator City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 4 of 16  Activation Phase Actions (continued) o Public Information Officer o Liaison Officer o Safety/Security Officer Legal Officer Request that the Public Information Officer (PIO) coordinate the dissemination of all emergency information, press releases and public statements, to prevent conflicting information, misinformation and the initiation of rumors, as appropriate to the type of emergency confronting the jurisdiction. Determine which Command Section positions are required and ensure that they are filled as soon as possible.  Schedule the initial Incident Action Plan (IAP) Planning meeting.  Provide a situation briefing to the Command Group.  Confer with the EOC Staff to determine what agency representation is needed at the EOC from other jurisdictions, the County, special districts and other emergency response agencies.  Ensure that the EOC activation level is coordinated with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County).  Ensure all pre-designated notifications are made as appropriate to the event and activation level.  Ensure alerting and call-in of key personnel from all jurisdiction agencies/departments as necessary.  Ensure the EOC facility is operational, including access routes, communication lines, utilities, etc.  Assume management of the EOC and declare the EOC operational at the appropriate level once staffing is adequate. Operational Phase Actions  Provide briefings to Section Coordinators, when activated.  If little or no damage is reported in the City of San Luis Obispo, ensure preparations are made to support more heavily damaged jurisdictions through the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC.  In conjunction with the PIO, conduct news conferences and review media releases for final approval, following the established procedure for information releases and media briefings.  Ensure that the Liaison Officer is providing for and maintaining effective interagency coordination. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 5 of 16  Based on current status reports, establish initial strategic objectives for the EOC. Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Ensure the Planning/Intelligence Coordinator conducts periodic briefings for all EOC Staff.  Establish demobilization criteria for deactivation of EOC and review periodically.  Ensure that the Planning/Intelligence and Finance/Administration Sections maintain enough documentation of EOC activities to submit appropriate reimbursement claims.  Ensure the Planning/Intelligence Coordinator keeps the Command Staff and the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC informed on all aspects of the emergency.  Ensure the Planning/Intelligence Coordinator keeps the Command Staff and the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC informed on all aspects of the emergency.  Review status reports prior to submission to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC. Deactivation Phase Actions  Authorize the demobilization of organizational elements within the EOC when no longer required. Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Notify the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC, emergency response agencies and other appropriate organizations of the expected planned deactivation time.  Ensure that any open actions not yet completed will be handled after deactivation.  Deactivate the EOC at the designated time, as appropriate.  Proclaim termination of the emergency and proceed with recovery operations.  Ensure that City of San Luis Obispo staff prepares a summary of emergency response operations and the After-Action Report and Improvement Report.  Notify the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC, emergency response agencies and other appropriate organizations of the expected planned deactivation time. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 6 of 16 C. Public Information Officer (PIO) 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Deputy City Manager, or as appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Public Information Officer (PIO) is responsible for all press and public communications regarding Emergency Operations Center (EOC) or jurisdictional emergency response activities. The primary role of the Communications team is to compile and disseminate information to the public via the news media and other communication methods. 2. Responsibilities a. Serve as the coordination point for all media releases for the jurisdiction. Represent the jurisdiction as the lead PIO. b. Ensure that the public within the affected area receives complete, accurate and consistent information about life safety procedures, public health advisories, relief and assistance programs and other vital information. c. Coordinate media releases with PIOs representing other affected emergency response agencies, including the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC PIO and other jurisdictional PIOs within the OA. d. Organize the format for press conferences in conjunction with the Director of Emergency Services. PIO Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC Checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director.  Request a Joint Information Center (JIC) Liaison when needed.  Review public information priorities as established by the Director of Emergency Services. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 7 of 16  Make initial contact with PIOs in other jurisdictions and at other government levels and establish lines of communication, including with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC. Activation Phase Actions (continued)  Prepare initial information summary as soon as possible after arrival.  Develop a public information plan, review the plan periodically and update it as changes occur. Operational Phase Actions  Ensure that all information is clear, concise, confirmed and approved by the Emergency Services Director before release to the media or public.  Determine the situation status in local city, County and State regions.  Keep the Emergency Services Director advised of all unusual requests for information and of all major critical or unfavorable media comments. Recommend procedures or measures to improve media relations.  Coordinate with the Situation/Status Unit, other EOC positions as required and outside agencies to obtain and verify significant information as it is developed.  Coordinate media briefings, to include location, format, preparation and distribution of handout materials.  Implement and maintain an overall information release program.  Provide adequate staff to answer questions from members of the media.  At the request of the Emergency Services Director, prepare media briefings for elected officials and provide other assistance as necessary to facilitate their participation in media briefings and press conferences.  Monitor published, broadcast, and Social Media public information for accuracy.  If the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC Hotline is activated, publicize the telephone number to be used for public inquiries related to additional emergency information.  Provide enough staffing and telephones to efficiently handle incoming media calls.  Coordinate with the Situation/Status Unit Leader in collecting technical information for the public (i.e. weather reports).  Disseminate and update locations to obtain food, shelter, supplies, health services, etc., to the public.  Ensure that announcements, emergency information and material are translated and prepared for non-English speaking residents.  Ensure that file copies are maintained of all information released.  Provide copies of all releases to the Emergency Services Director. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 8 of 16  Prepare final news releases and advise media representatives of points-of-contact for follow-up stories.  Monitor media as an information source.  Attend meetings to update information releases. Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Respond to special requests for information.  Ensure that the jurisdiction’s official spokespersons are thoroughly briefed about all aspects of the emergency.  In coordination with the Care and Shelter Branch Director, prepare public information materials relative to recovery assistance services and make available to the public.  Keep PIOs in other jurisdictions and at other government levels appraised of information released.  Continue to release status information during the recovery phase.  Accommodate County, State and Federal information officers and assist them in releasing information on assistance programs.  Release information on restoration of utilities and any travel restrictions still in effect.  Gather all records kept during all phases of the emergency and prepare a chronological summary of all events, actions taken, inquires made and responses given. Collect newspaper clippings and TV videotapes, if available. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 9 of 16 City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 10 of 16 D. Liaison Officer 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Liaison Officer oversees all Emergency Operations Center (EOC) liaison activities, including requesting agency representatives for the EOC. The Liaison Officer also processes requests from the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC for representatives from the EOC and/or City Departments. 2. Responsibilities a. Oversee all liaison activities, including coordinating outside agency representatives assigned to the EOC. b. Establish and maintain a central location for incoming agency representatives, providing workspace and support as needed. c. Ensure that position specific guidelines, policy directives, situation reports and a copy of the Incident Action Plan (IAP) are provided to Agency Representatives upon check-in. d. In conjunction with the Emergency Services Director and Public Information Officer (PIO), provide orientation briefings for VIPs and other visitors to the EOC. Liaison Officer Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC Checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director and Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 11 of 16 Operational Phase Actions  Assess the need for and coordinate, if requested, liaisons from outside agencies to the EOC.  Provide situation status information and response activity information to the agency representatives at the EOC. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 12 of 16 E.Legal Officer 1.Position Description Responsible Party: City Attorney Alternate: Assistant City Attorney or as appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Legal Officer serves as legal counsel to the Emergency Services Director. 2.Responsibilities a.Prepares proclamations, emergency ordinances, and other legal documents. b.Advises the Emergency Services Director, Command Group, and the entire emergency management organization as needed. c.Commences legal proceedings as needed. d.Enforces emergency actions. Legal Officer Checklist Activation Phase Actions Review this and All Staff EOC Checklists. Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director. Operational Phase Actions Establish areas of legal responsibility and/or potential liabilities. Advise the Emergency Services Director and Command Staff on the legality and/or legal implications of contemplated emergency actions and/or policies. Develop the rules and regulations and laws required for acquisition and/or control of critical resources. Develop the necessary ordinances and regulations to provide a legal basis for evacuation and/or population control Commence such civil and criminal proceedings as are necessary and appropriate to implement and enforce Incident Action Plan (IAP). City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 13 of 16 Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized the Emergency Services Director.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 14 of 16 F. EOC Safety/Security Officer 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Assigned by Law Enforcement Representative Alternate: As appointed by Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Safety/Security Officer is responsible for ensuring a secure environment within the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The Safety/Security Officer will coordinate all safety matters in the EOC and may assist the Compensation/Claims Unit Leader in the investigation and reporting of all Workers’ Compensation Claims. 2. Responsibilities a. Coordinate or provide 24-hour security for the EOC. b. Control personnel access to the EOC in accordance with policies established by the Emergency Services Director. c. Ensure that all buildings and other facilities used in support of the EOC are in safe operating condition. d. Monitor operational procedures and activities in the EOC to ensure they are being conducted in a safe manner considering the existing situation and conditions. e. Stop or modify all unsafe operations outside the scope of the Incident Action Plan (IAP), notifying the Emergency Services Director of actions taken. EOC Safety & Security Officer Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC Checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director.  Determine operating location and set-up as necessary. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 15 of 16 Operational Phase Actions  Provide advice and guidance to the Emergency Services Director on site security matters.  Coordinate with the Section Coordinators (or Personnel Unit, if activated) on the verification of personnel requesting admittance to the EOC as necessary.  Ensure that all EOC Staff are wearing badges.  Ensure that all non-EOC Staff is escorted, coordinate escorts with the Emergency Services Director or PIO.  Coordinate support staff to ensure that all facilities, including parking areas used in support of the EOC and emergency operations, are safe and secure.  Monitor all EOC and related facility activities to ensure that there are no outside threats to the facilities and personnel.  Evaluate conditions and advise the Emergency Services Director of any conditions and/or actions which might compromise the security of the facility and emergency personnel.  Monitor EOC staff for signs of stress, unsafe fatigue, etc.  Coordinate with the Logistics Section Coordinator to ensure that all facilities used in support of the EOC and emergency operations have safe operating conditions.  Study the facility to learn the location of all fire extinguishers and emergency procedures.  Monitor all EOC and related facility activities to ensure that they are being conducted in as safe a manner as possible under the existing circumstances. Stop or modify any unsafe operations.  Coordinate with the Logistics Section Coordinator to obtain assistance for any special safety requirements.  Evaluate conditions and advice the Emergency Services Director of any conditions and actions which might result in liability, oversights, improper response actions, etc.  Ensure safety messages and briefings are provided as needed.  Keep the Emergency Services Director advised of safety conditions.  Coordinate with Compensation/Claims Unit Leader on any personnel injury claims or records preparation as necessary for proper case evaluation and closure.  Be familiar with any potentially hazardous conditions in the facility.  Participate in planning meetings. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 16 of 16 G. Deputy Emergency Services Director 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Assistant City Manager Alternate: As appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director 2. Responsibilities a. Facilitate the overall functioning of the City of San Luis Obispo EOC. b. Assist and serve as an advisor to the Emergency Services Director and General Staff as needed. c. Providing information and guidance related to the internal functions of the EOC and ensure compliance with Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC emergency plans and procedures. Deputy Emergency Services Director Checklist Activation Phase  Assist the Emergency Services Director in determining appropriate staffing for the EOC.  Provide assistance and information regarding section staffing to all general staff. Operational Phase  Assist the Emergency Services Director and the General Staff in developing an overall strategic objective as well as section objectives for the Incident Action Plan (IAP).  Advise the Emergency Services Director on procedures for enacting emergency proclamations, emergency ordinances and resolutions, and other legal requirements.  Assist the Planning/Intelligence Section in the development, continuous updating, and execution of the EOC Incident Action Plan (IAP).  Provide overall procedural guidance to General Staff as required.  Provide general advice and guidance to the Emergency Services Director as required.  Ensure that all notifications are made to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC.  Ensure that all communications with appropriate emergency response agencies are established and maintained. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Command Staff Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 2 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Command Staf f Position Checklist s Page 17 of 16  Assist Emergency Services Director in preparing for and conducting briefings with Management Staff, the City Council, the media, and the general public.  Provide assistance with shift change activity as required. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Policy Group Description-Organization-Checklists Section 3 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Policy Group Position Checklist Page 1 of 1 Policy Group 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Mayor, Mayor Pro-Tem, City Council Members, and others as appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Policy Group advises the Emergency Services Director on recovery and management issues, as well as setting priorities and establishing policies governing jurisdictional emergency response operations and activities. 2. Responsibilities a. Ensure the Emergency Services Director receives the necessary information and counsel to make effective and timely decisions pertaining to the prevention (if applicable), response, recovery and management of emergencies. b. Maintain situational awareness of the current emergency response efforts and their effectiveness. c. Have a working knowledge of existing government policies, emergency responsibilities and recovery issues. Policy Group Member Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director. Operational Phase Actions  Ensure that Section Position Logs (ICS Form 214) and other necessary files are maintained.  Provide advice and policy guidance to the Emergency Services Director.  Monitor and review potential and/or actual disaster situations.  Advise, assist, support and make appropriate recommendations on mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery to the Emergency Services Director.  Assist in establishing strategies, priorities and policies for emergency response activities.  Ensure planning is initiated and coordinated for the recovery and restoration of vital services and facilities in the jurisdiction. Provide policy direction and support. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 1 of 15 A. Description and Organizational Chart 1. The Operations Section includes all activities which are directed toward the reduction of the immediate hazard, establishing control, and restoration of City operations. The Section consists of those departments or agencies that are responsible for public safety and carrying out response activities. The individual agencies receive and evaluate requests for assistance and resources, establish priorities, and reports operational status and information to the Command Staff. 2. Among those functions usually represented in the Section are Fire and Rescue, Law Enforcement, Care and Shelter, Public Works, Utilities. 3. The overall responsibility of this section is to coordinate with field operations. The following organizational chart details the Operations Section: City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 2 of 15 B. Operations Section Coordinator 1. Position Description Responsible Party (Fire Incident): Fire Chief, or as appointed Responsible Party (Law Enforcement): Police Chief, or as appointed Responsible Party (Non-Fire Natural Disaster Incident): Public Works Director, or as appointed Alternate: As designated by Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Operations Section Coordinator is responsible for: ensuring that the operations function is carried out within the EOC, the operations portion of the Incident Action Plan (IAP), and all other Operations Section activities. Additional agencies may be requested by the Emergency Services Director and placed into the Operations Section as required. The Operations Section Coordinator manages the activities of the following Branches: Fire and Rescue, Law Enforcement, Care and Shelter, Public Works. If the recommended span of control is exceeded, a Deputy Operations Section Coordinator may be appointed by the Emergency Services Director as required. 2. Responsibilities a. Ensure that the Operations function is carried out within the EOC. b. Exercise overall responsibility for Operations Section activities. c. Ensure that objectives and assignments identified in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) are carried out effectively. d. Establish the appropriate level of organization within the Operations Section, continuously monitoring their effectiveness and modifying accordingly. e. Provide the Planning/Intelligence Situation/Status Unit Leader with Operations Section status reports. f. Keeps the Emergency Services Director informed of significant issues affecting the Operations Section. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 3 of 15 Operations Section Coodinator Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director.  Ensure that Section Position Logs (ICS Form 214) and other necessary files are maintained.  Based on the situation as known or forecast, assess Operations Section needs and plan for the activation of the section.  Ensure that the Operations Section is set up properly and that appropriate personnel, equipment and supplies are in place.  Coordinate with the Liaison Officer regarding the need for Agency Representatives within the Operations Section.  Obtain a current communications status briefing from the Logistics Section. Ensure that there is adequate equipment and frequencies available for the Operations Section.  Establish communications with the Incident Command Post.  Identify key issues currently affecting the Operations Section; meet with Section personnel and determine appropriate section objectives for the first operational period.  Activate organizational elements and functions within the section, staff as appropriate and designate Directors/Leaders for each element. Ensure the section is properly staffed for 24-hour operations. Continuously monitor the effectiveness of the section and make changes as required. o Fire and Rescue Branch o Law Enforcement Branch o Care and Shelter Branch o Public Works o Utilities Operational Phase Actions  Provide input to the Incident Action Plan (IAP), implement the objectives of the Operations Section and monitor progress.  Ensure that the operations function, operational objectives and assignments are carried out effectively, including coordination between response agencies.  Ensure situation status information collected by Operations Section personnel is given to the Situation/Status Unit Leader.  Coordinate as necessary, with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC.  Ensure that all section personnel are maintaining their individual position logs. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 4 of 15 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Coordinate requests for non-fire and non-law mutual aid or other outside assistance with the Logistics Section in accordance with existing agreements or policies.  Determine the need for representation or participation of mutual aid system resource representatives and plan for including such representatives at the EOC.  Keep the Emergency Services Director informed of the situation, effectiveness of operations and special conditions or activities.  Coordinate with the Safety/Security Officer to communicate health advisory information to all EOC Staff.  Ensure that all media contacts are referred to the Public Information Officer.  Ensure that all fiscal and administrative requirements are completed and coordinated through the Finance/Administration Section.  Advise the Emergency Services Director on Operational issues regarding recovery. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 5 of 15 C. Fire and Rescue Branch Director 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Fire Chief Alternate: Deputy Fire Chief, or as appointed by the Fire Chief Reports to: Operations Section Coordinator The Fire and Rescue Branch Director provides the Operations Section Coordinator of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) with expertise on all areas related to Fire and Rescue Operations, maintains awareness of all Fire and Rescue activities conducted in the jurisdiction and provides coordination of resource requests from Fire Services if they cannot be filled through existing fire mutual aid. 2. Responsibilities a. Maintain situational awareness of fire, hazardous materials and search and rescue operations conducted throughout the jurisdiction. b. Monitor and coordinate with Fire Services Incident Command Post (ICP) activities to ensure situation status is received and tracked by the Situation/Status Unit. c. Coordinate the mobilization and transportation of resources not available via fire mutual aid through the Logistics Section. Fire & Rescue Branch Director Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Operations Section Coordinator.  Establish phone and e-mail communications with the San Luis Obispo Fire Department Operations Center (DOC).  Determine the status of transportation routes. Coordinate with Public Works and Law Enforcement Branch Directors.  Identify equipment and personnel commitments and their locations.  Identify anticipated equipment and personnel shortages.  Inventory availability of public and private rescue personnel and equipment and rescue teams.  Check communications to ensure dispatching and reporting systems are operating. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 6 of 15 Operational Phase Actions  Obtain an initial situation report and provide it to the Operations Section Coordinator.  Provide the Operations Section Coordinator and the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator with an overall summary of Fire and Rescue Branch operations periodically or as requested during the operational period.  Maintain current status of Fire and Rescue missions being conducted in your area of responsibility.  Coordinate hazardous material spills and release response.  Monitor and coordinate (if required) requests for Urban Search and Rescue with fire mutual aid and the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC.  Coordinate with the Law Enforcement Branch Director and Logistics Section Transportation Unit Leader to assist in any search and rescue functions under the jurisdiction of Law Enforcement and in any evacuation and/or warning functions as per request or need, outside normal fire service rescue functions.  Maintain awareness of and provide support for the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC efforts to: o Inform hospitals and emergency personnel of casualties and potential for exposure to the hazardous materials, if any. o Determine the condition of designated field treatment sites, mass care facilities and casualty collection. o Determine the potential for fire, environmental pollution and toxicity to humans and animals. o Determine condition of pre-designated "Target Hazard" locations for casualty assessment, hazardous materials release, or high-value and essential service property damage. o Coordinate and provide support to field emergency medical care and first aid.  Determine if current and forecast conditions will support large and intense fires or exacerbate hazardous materials spills.  Assist the Law Enforcement Branch Director and Logistics Section Transportation Unit Leader as necessary, in warning and evacuation.  Determine current and future resource needs and take action to correct for deficiencies.  Establish priorities for procurement and allocation of available resources.  Coordinate with the Logistics Section Supply/Procurement Unit Leader for non-Fire Department personnel, equipment and supply needs. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 7 of 15 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Coordinate with Public Works for debris clearance from pre-planned routes required for supporting fire and rescue activities.  Coordinate with the Logistics Section and Public Works to provide equipment and personnel needed for heavy rescue operations, debris removal and hazardous materials containment, etc.  Assist the Logistics Section in coordination, activation and support of multipurpose mobilization and staging areas.  If protective actions are implemented, ensure all Fire Services personnel in the affected area are advised and take all necessary actions.  Ensure communications are maintained with other fire agencies.  Assist in re-entry and recovery operations and ensure requested activities do not pose a health threat to emergency workers. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 8 of 15 D. Law Enforcement Branch 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Police Chief Alternate: Police Captain, or as appointed by the Police Chief Reports to: Operations Section Coordinator The Law Enforcement Branch Director provides the Operations Section Coordinator of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) with expertise in Law Enforcement Operations. The Director is responsible for coordination of movement, law enforcement, traffic control and public protection during an emergency. 2. Responsibilities a. Coordinate movement and evacuation operations during a disaster. b. Alert and notify the public of the impending or existing emergency via the PIO. c. Coordinate law enforcement and traffic control operations during the disaster. d. Coordinate site security at incidents. e. Monitor and coordinate with Law Enforcement Incident Command Post (ICP) activities to ensure situation status is received and tracked by the Situation/Status Unit. f. Maintain situational awareness of all law enforcement operations conducted throughout the jurisdiction. g. Coordinate Medical Examiner activities in San Luis Obispo with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC Medical Examiner Unit Leader. Law Enforcement Branch Director Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Operations Section Coordinator.  Establish phone and e-mail communications with the Law Enforcement Departmental Operations Center (DOC). City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 9 of 15 Operational Phase Actions  Maintain situational awareness of Law Enforcement operations being conducted in support of the incident.  Provide the Operations Section Coordinator with an overall summary of Law Enforcement Branch operations periodically or as requested during the operational period.  Obtain damage information, particularly at pre-designated key facilities and estimate the affected area(s). Coordinate with Public Works and Fire and Rescue Branch Directors on survey areas.  Coordinate the mobilization, deployment and organization of law enforcement and traffic control mutual aid operations.  Provide security for evacuated areas, key facilities, resources and supplies as required.  Provide support for the control of vehicular traffic and pedestrian movement.  Provide support for increased security in potential high crime areas and at essential facilities, as requested.  Participate in the development of a traffic control and evacuation plan in conjunction with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC, California Highway Patrol, Caltrans and other Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) Members’ Law Enforcement agencies.  Implement perimeter and traffic control as required. Request barricades and related items from the Public Works Director.  Ensure that requested law enforcement and traffic control personnel are dispatched to all traffic control points.  Provide information to the Public Information Officer (PIO), through the Operations Section Coordinator, on matters relative to public safety.  If protective actions are implemented, ensure all Law Enforcement personnel in the affected area are advised and take all necessary actions.  Ensure that transportation resources are being prepared for deployment to the affected area, if necessary, through the Logistics Section.  If a curfew is to be imposed, prepare instructions and curfew order, submit to the Operations Section Coordinator to secure Command Group approval. Issue instructions to all Law Enforcement personnel as directed. Coordinate release of curfew order with PIO  Provide security forces for the EOC and staging areas in coordination with the Security Officer.  If mass care facilities have been opened, coordinate with the Care and Shelter Branch Director and the Safety/Security Officer to ensure security is provided for these facilities. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 10 of 15 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Develop re-entry traffic control and law enforcement plans and implement once re- entry into the affected area has been authorized.  Assist in re-entry and recovery operations and ensure requested activities do not pose a health threat to emergency workers. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 11 of 15 E. Care and Shelter Branch Director 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Operations Coordinator Alternate: As Appointed by the Operations Coordinator Reports to: Operations Section Coordinator The Care and Shelter Branch Director is responsible for assisting Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Staff with the planning and execution of care and shelter operations. 1. Responsibilities a. Coordinate with Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC and American Red Cross Disaster Operations Center (ARC-DOC) and other volunteer agencies for the provision of food, potable water, shelter and other necessities. b. Coordinate with the American Red Cross Disaster Welfare Inquiry Officer to reunite families or respond to inquiries from relatives or friends. c. Coordinate safety and emergency needs identified by agencies within the EOC with the American Red Cross Liaison Officer. d. Coordinate receiving, boarding, and feeding of evacuated or abandoned animals. e. Coordinate animals’ return to owners. f. Establish a designated care and shelter facility for family members of disaster personnel Care and Shelter Branch Director Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Operations Section Coordinator.  Contact the American Red Cross (ARC) at (805) 928.0778 for approval of shelter location and support. Failure to contact ARC will result in the inability to recover costs for shelter operations. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 12 of 15 Operational Phase Actions  Provide a current care and shelter status report to the Operations Section Coordinator, when requested.  Establish and maintain a shelter status board.  Maintain liaison with the appropriate ARC Chapter, volunteer service agencies and such sub-area representatives within the county, and the local animal services provider, as designated.  Request additional resource assistance through the Logistics Section, if necessary.  Coordinate the assessment of mass care needs, housing requirements and inventory and allocation of temporary lodging.  Based upon data received by following the previous steps, work with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC to allocate shelter space and assign evacuees, by area, to facilities.  If evacuations are initiated or appear to be imminent, coordinate with the Law Enforcement Branch Director and the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC Care and Shelter Branch Director to determine, at a minimum: o The boundaries of the evacuation area(s). o The activated shelter facilities meet requirements described under the Americans with Disabilities Act. o The number of evacuees requiring food and shelter. (It is anticipated that a portion of the evacuees will arrange for their own food and shelter.) o The number of evacuees with special needs, such as the critically ill, disabled, elderly, infirm, and non-English speaking. To the extent possible, designate space within lodging shelter facilities to house these individuals.  Ensure the flow of information between Care and Shelter facilities and the EOC has been established.  Periodically poll mass care facilities to determine the evacuee load and support requirements.  Facilitate the relocation of the public from non-ARC and temporary shelters to shelters with ARC services wherever possible. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Operations Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Position Check List Page 13 of 15 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Ensure activation of shelters includes: o School personnel are notified o Shelter management personnel respond  Ensure the following services are provided at each shelter: o Crisis Counseling (Coordinate with the ARC and the Behavioral Health Unit Leader in the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County EOC). o Security and Traffic Control (Coordinate with the Law Enforcement Branch Director in the EOC). o Resources to enable Communications (Coordinate with the Logistics Section in the EOC). o Liaison with Local Animal Services Provider to coordinate care for any pets brought to the Shelters. (Also, coordinate with Animal Services Branch Director in the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County EOC.) o Assign staff to verify and report to disaster personnel on the status and safety of their family.  Coordinate with the Logistics Section to ensure the transportation of evacuees to and from shelter facilities.  Inform the Public Information Officer (PIO), through the Operations Section Coordinator, of current information as needed.  Ensure specialized services are provided as required for populations with access and functional needs.  Coordinate the consolidation and eventual deactivation of shelters, ensuring an orderly transition from mass care to separate family living to post-disaster recovery. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Handbook Operations Section Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Section Checklist Page 14 of 15 F. Public Works Director 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Public Works Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Public Works Director Reports to: Operations Section Coordinator The Public Works Director is responsible for coordinating and advising Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Staff on the procurement, distribution and use of resources required to restore roads, storm drain systems, buildings, wastewater treatment facilities and transit. 2. Responsibilities a. Survey all systems and restore systems that have been disrupted, including roads, storm drain systems, buildings, wastewater treatment b. facilities and transit facilities. c. Assist other sections, branches and units within the EOC as needed with Public Works issues. Public Works Director Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Operations Section Coordinator.  Establish phone and e-mail communications with the Public Works Department Operations Center (DOC).  Ensure damage and safety assessment are coordinated with the Planning/Intelligence Section. Operational Phase Actions  Coordinate damage assessment activities to determine the status of: o All buildings o Transportation routes, bridges and overpasses o Flood Control Channels o Parks City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Handbook Operations Section Section 4 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Operations Section Checklist Page 15 of 15 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Maintain current status on all public works activities being conducted in or by the City of San Luis Obispo.  Coordinate road closure/opening issues with the Law Enforcement Branch Director.  Determine if local resources are adequate to deal with the emergency. If necessary, request additional assistance through the Logistics Section.  Coordinate with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC and appropriate jurisdictional agencies to secure resources for: o Emergency debris removal. o Inspection and demolition of structures deemed to be an imminent hazard. o Determining the safety of emergency operations facilities, public shelters and reception and care centers. o Determining the safety of evacuation routes.  If protective actions are recommended, ensure all personnel take all necessary actions.  Coordinate with Public Works Staff on status assessment and restoration of vital services.  Coordinate the source, location and availability of heavy equipment, construction materials and vehicles.  Provide information to the Planning/Intelligence Section to complete Initial Damage Estimates and ensure the Estimates are submitted to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC.  Coordinate the provision of resources to assist in preliminary damage assessments, re- entry and recovery operations, as appropriate.  Assist in re-entry and recovery operations and ensure requested activities do not pose a health threat to emergency workers. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 1 of 16 A. Description and Organizational Chart 1. The Logistics Section consists of those departments with responsibilities for the procurement of personnel and equipment necessary for the management of and recovery from the emergency. The Logistics Section coordinates the procurement and provision of emergency resources and support for the response and recovery operations being conducted in the field as well as those in the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC Logistics Section coordinates the procurement and provision of emergency resources and support for the entire City of San Luis Obispo. 2. The following organizational chart details the Logistics Section: City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 2 of 16 B. Logistics Section Coordinator 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Logistics Section Coordinator is responsible for establishment and management of the Logistics Section including the following units: Communications/IT, Transportation, Facilities, Supply/Procurement, and Personnel. 2. Responsibilities a. Ensure the Logistics function is carried out within the EOC. This function includes providing communication services, resource tracking, acquiring equipment, supplies, personnel, facilities and transportation services; as well as arranging for food, lodging and other support services as required. b. Exercise overall responsibility for Logistics Section activities. c. Ensure that objectives and assignments identified in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) are carried out effectively. d. Establish the appropriate level of organization within the Logistics Section, continuously monitoring their effectiveness and modifying accordingly. e. Coordinate with the Operations Section Coordinator to establish priorities for resource allocation. f. Register spontaneous volunteers as Disaster Service Workers (DSW). g. Keeps the Emergency Services Director informed of all significant issues affecting the Logistic Section. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 3 of 16 Logistics Section Coordinator Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director.  Ensure that Section Position Logs (ICS Form 214) and other necessary files are maintained.  Ensure the Logistics Section is set up properly and that appropriate personnel, equipment and supplies are in place, including maps, status boards, vendor references and other resource directories.  Meet with the Emergency Services Director and Section Coordinators and identify immediate resource needs.  Meet with the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator and determine level of purchasing authority for the Logistics Section.  Activate organizational elements and functions within the section, staff as appropriate and designate leaders for each element. Ensure the section is properly staffed for 24- hour operations. Continuously monitor the effectiveness of the section and make changes as required. o Communications/IT Unit o Transportation Unit o Facilities Unit o Supply/Procurement Unit o Personnel Unit Operational Phase Actions  Ensure that the City of San Luis Obispo Purchase Log is maintained.  Ensure that transportation requirements, in support of response operations, are met.  Ensure that all requests for facilities and facilities support are addressed.  Ensure that all jurisdictional resources are tracked and accounted for, including resources requested by the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC through Mutual Aid.  Ensure the coordination of resource acquisition, management and distribution.  Ensure that records of resources requested and/or received from outside the jurisdiction are maintained and coordinated.  Ensure Logistics Section personnel coordinate with all EOC Section requests for and allocation of resources.  Determine the need for representation or participation of mutual aid system resource representatives. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 4 of 16  Ensure that all fiscal and administrative requirements are completed and coordinated through the Finance/Administration Section.  Advise the Emergency Services Director on Logistics issues regarding recovery. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 5 of 16 C. Communications/IT Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: Information Systems Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Logistics Section Coordinator The Communications/IT Unit Leader is responsible for the primary and back-up communication and information technology systems that are used by response organizations/agencies during the emergency response and recovery periods. 2. Responsibilities a. Ensure radio, telephone and computer resources and services are provided to Emergency Operations Center (EOC) staff as required. b. Oversee the installation of communications resources within the EOC. Ensure that a communications link is established with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC. c. Determine specific computer requirements for all EOC positions. d. Develop and distribute a Communications Plan which identifies all systems in use and lists specific frequencies allotted for the disaster. e. Ensure network access for all EOC Staff. Communications/IT Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Logistics Section Coordinator.  Ensure EOC Communications Systems are operational.  Ensure EOC Computer Systems are operational.  Ascertain the status of communications systems throughout the jurisdiction. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 6 of 16 Operational Phase Actions  Manage and maintain EOC communications facilities and systems.  Monitor communications to determine the situation in other jurisdictions.  Monitor network access and EOC IT support needs. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 7 of 16 D. Transportation Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Logistics Section Coordinator The Transportation Unit Leader is responsible for the transportation of personnel, equipment, supplies, subsistence stocks, fuel, energy systems and equipment for emergency operations. The Transportation Unit Leader is also responsible for transportation routing and scheduling and the work assignments for transportation support. 2. Responsibilities a. In coordination with Public Works and Law Enforcement and the Situation/Status Unit, develop a Transportation Plan to support EOC operations. b. Arrange for the acquisition or use of required transportation services. c. Monitor transportation resources and requirements. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 8 of 16 Transportation Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Logistics Section Coordinator.  Determine the nature, scope and severity of the emergency and potential transportation issues.  Routinely coordinate with the Situation/Status Unit Leader and Law Enforcement Branch Director to determine the status of transportation routes in and around the City.  Routinely coordinate with the Public Works Department to determine progress of route recovery operations.  Develop a Transportation Plan which identifies routes of ingress and egress, thus facilitating the movement of response personnel, the affected population and shipment of resources and material. Operational Phase Actions  Determine the status of: o All City of San Luis Obispo owned vehicles. o Petroleum products, parts and fuel on hand. o Staffing needed to provide enough vehicle operators and mechanics.  Continually evaluate the transportation needs (personnel, facilities and equipment) to determine if additional resources are needed. Additional necessary resources should be acquired through the Personnel Unit and/or the Supply/Procurement Unit.  Process transportation requests in coordination with the Operations Section. Advise the requester of the disposition of the request.  In conjunction with transit service providers, school districts, and the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC Transportation Unit Leader, determine the number of busses and other transportation resources available to support an evacuation and establish a transportation resource staging area.  Contact the San Luis Obispo Unified School District to determine if area school districts can provide buses and drivers if needed.  Coordinate maintenance and repair of primary tactical equipment vehicles and mobile ground support equipment.  Coordinate with the Public Works and the Law Enforcement Branch Directors to develop and implement a Traffic Plan. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 9 of 16 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Manage the operation of a transportation pool (e.g., staff cars, buses, pickups, etc.) which can be used for transporting personnel from one location to another.  Coordinate with fuel suppliers to establish distribution priorities.  Develop and maintain a list of vehicles equipped with two-way radios.  Provide the Logistics Section Coordinator with up to date information on the status of transportation vehicles, their locations and capabilities. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 10 of 16 E. Facilities Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Logistics Section Coordinator The Facilities Unit Leader is responsible for maintaining the EOC and coordinating with the Safety/Security Officer to monitor other City buildings and facilities. 2. Responsibilities a. Ensure that adequate facilities are provided for the response effort, including securing access to needed facilities. b. Supervise facilities maintenance staff to ensure facilities are maintained, including sanitation, lighting, environmental systems, structural assessment, etc. c. Monitor damage to other jurisdictional buildings and provide updates to the Situation/Status Unit Leader. Facilities Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Logistics Section Coordinator. Operational Phase Actions  Ensure facility operations activities are completed, including structural assessment, environmental systems, lighting, etc.  Ensure the interior and exterior EOC facility and systems are activated and operable.  Provide jurisdiction building and facilities updates to the Situation/Status Unit Leader.  Ensure EOC facility and staff support needs are met including hygiene, sanitation and sleeping quarters in coordination with the Care and Shelter Branch Director. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 11 of 16 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Identify facilities (City owned or available for lease) available to be used in the emergency response as staging areas, warehouses, and alternate worksites for City employees, etc.  Ensure heating, ventilation and air conditioning are functioning properly, coordinate repairs if needed.  Coordinate access to supplies and resources for EOC Staff from closed facilities. Ensure all such facilities are safe before permitting or providing access.  Coordinate the provision of chemical toilets to staging areas, as requested.  Order any additional items required (e.g., portable toilets and shower facilities, lighting units, etc.) through the Supply/Procurement Unit Leader. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 12 of 16 F. Supply/Procurement Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Logistics Section Coordinator The Supply/Procurement Unit Leader is responsible for the determination of resource and support requirements, the acquisition of resources and coordination with the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Staff, especially the Finance/Administration Section, to track resource utilization and related costs. 2. Responsibilities a. Oversee the procurement and allocation of supplies and material not normally provided through mutual aid channels. b. Coordinate procurement actions with the Finance/Administration Section. c. Coordinate delivery of supplies and material as required. d. Oversee the tracking of resources used in response operations. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 13 of 16 Supply/Procurement Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Logistics Section Coordinator.  Establish and maintain a City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Procurement Log.  Maintain copies of requisitions, purchase receipts and notes.  Determine procurement spending limits and availability of funds with the Finance/Administration Section.  Coordinate with the Finance/Administration Section to assign a purchase order number to all purchases to facilitate post-incident cost accounting and reimbursement.  Ensure enough supply of preprinted Emergency Requisition Forms and Emergency Purchase Log pages are on hand. Operational Phase Actions  Maintain accurate records on the use of personnel, equipment and materials and all expenditures for all resource requests.  Maintain a current resource directory and inventory for necessary supplies, equipment and services.  Post and maintain a resource status master list, indicating current location and status of all resources.  Whenever possible, meet personally with the requesting party to clarify types and amount of supplies and material and verify that the request has not been previously filled through another source.  Determine if the procurement item can be provided in a timely manner, without cost, from the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC, or another jurisdiction/organization within the OA.  Determine unit costs of supplies and material, from suppliers and vendors and if they will accept confirming purchase order numbers or a credit card as payment, prior to completing the order.  If vendor contracts are required for procurement of specific resources or services, refer the request to the Finance/Administration Section Unit for development of necessary agreements.  Determine if the vendor or provider will deliver the ordered items. If delivery services are not available, coordinate pickup and delivery through the Transportation Unit.  Ensure appropriate receipt paperwork is obtained from receiving personnel or runners/drivers whenever possible considering the circumstances. This will help in reconciling purchases later. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logistics Position Check List Page 14 of 16 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Coordinate the location and support of staging areas, support facilities, and additional resources as necessary with the Facilities and Personnel Unit Leaders.  Coordinate the moving of resources and supplies from hazard threatened areas.  Keeps the Logistics Section Coordinator informed of significant issues affecting the Supply/Procurement Unit. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logisti cs Section Position Checklist s Page 15 of 16 G. Personnel Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Logistics Section Coordinator The Personnel Unit Leader is responsible for human resources operations and coordinating the provision of additional personnel as requested by EOC Staff. 2. Responsibilities a. Provide personnel resources as requested in support of EOC and field operations. b. Develop and maintain the EOC Organizational Chart. c. Identify back-up and relief personnel for Branch Director, Unit Leader and Support Staff positions as requested by the Emergency Services Director or Section Coordinators. d. Coordinate with the Safety/Security Officer (if activated) to assist in the verification of reporting personnel. e. Coordinate with the Compensation/Claims Unit and the Time Unit to ensure record keeping requirements are met. f. Coordinate registration of spontaneous volunteers as Disaster Service Workers. Personnel Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Logistics Section Coordinator.  Coordinate personnel timekeeping and related inquires with the Finance/Administration Section. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Logistics Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 5 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Logisti cs Section Position Checklist s Page 16 of 16 Operational Phase Actions  Determine if local personnel resources are adequate to deal with the emergency. Continually evaluate personnel needs to determine if additional resources are needed.  Establish a list of supplemental personnel and their skills.  Provide personnel to all functions within the EOC upon request.  If temporary workers or individuals with specialized skills need to be obtained, contact private personnel providers.  Coordinate with the Finance/Administration Section to provide guidance on emergency timekeeping procedures with respect to salary, benefits, worker’s compensation and documentation consistent with Federal, State, County and City guidelines. Assist in implementation of these procedures, as needed.  Coordinate with the Safety/Security Officer to ensure all emergency workers are identified and contacted after EOC demobilization for post-incident stress debriefing.  Coordinate worker’s compensation claims and timekeeping issues with the Finance/Administration Section, as needed.  Coordinate registration of spontaneous volunteers as Disaster Service Workers and assignment as appropriate. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance/Administrative Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist s Page 1 of 10 A. Description and Organizational Chart 1. The Finance/Administration Section is responsible for all finance, emergency funding and cost accountability functions for EOC operations and for supervising branch functions providing financial and contracting services for EOC operations within its jurisdiction. Some of these functions may include: a. Financial expenditure and funding briefings. b. Interagency financial coordination. c. Finance and contract fact-finding. d. Fiscal and emergency finance estimating. e. Operating procedure development and financial planning. f. Labor expense and accounting. g. Cost analysis, cost accounting and financial auditing. h. Disbursement and receivables management. i. Necessary funding transfers. j. Special drafts, exchanges and lending controls. k. Payroll administration. l. Emergency currency, script and rationing control. 2. The following organizational chart details the Finance/Administration Section: City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance/Administrative Section Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist s Page 2 of 10 B. Finance Section Coordinator 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Finance/Administration Section Coordinator is responsible for coordinating all financial aspects of an emergency and the transition to recovery operations, including mitigation following an emergency. The Finance/Administration Section Coordinator manages the activities of the following units: Time, Compensation/Claims and Cost Accounting. 2. Responsibilities a. Ensure the Finance/Administration function is carried out within the EOC. b. Exercise overall responsibility for Finance/Administration Section activities. c. Ensure that objectives and assignments identified in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) are carried out effectively. d. Establish the appropriate level of organization within the Finance Administration Section, continually monitoring their effectiveness and modifying accordingly. e. Obtain an internal tracking # for the disaster and distribute to all EOC staff. f. Work with departments and agencies to ensure that all financial records are maintained throughout the response and recovery. g. Ensure that there is a continuum of the payroll process for all City employees responding to the disaster. h. Determine purchase order and purchase card limits for the procurement function in the Logistics Section. i. Track estimated costs of worker's compensation claims. j. Ensure that all travel and expense claims are processed within a reasonable time, given the nature of the situation. k. Keeps the Emergency Services Director informed of all significant issues affecting the Finance/Administration Section. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 3 of 10 Finance Section Coordinator Checklist  Ensure that the Finance Section is set up properly and that appropriate personnel, equipment, and supplies are in place.  Ensure that Section Position Logs (ICS Form 214) and other necessary files are maintained.  Based on the situation; activate units within section as needed. o Time Keeping Unit o Compensation & Claims Unit o Purchasing Unit  Ensure that enough staff is available for a 24-hour schedule, or as required.  Meet with the Logistics Section Coordinator and review financial and administrative support requirements and procedures; determine the level of purchasing authority to be delegated to Logistics Section.  Meet with Section Staff to ensure that responsibilities are clearly understood.  Notify the Emergency Services Director when the Finance Section is operational.  Ensure that Finance Section Position Logs (ICS Form 214) and other necessary files are maintained.  Ensure that displays associated with the Finance Section are current, and that information is posted.  Brief Section Staff to ensure they are aware of the EOC objectives as defined in the Incident Action Plan (IAP).  Keep the Emergency Services Director and Command Staff aware of the current fiscal situation and other related matters, on an on-going basis.  Ensure that the Time Keeping Unit tracks and records all agency staff time.  In collaboration with the Logistics Section, ensure that the Purchasing Unit processes purchase orders and develops contracts in a timely manner.  Ensure that the Compensation & Claims Unit processes all workers’ compensation claims, resulting from the disaster, in a reasonable timeframe, given the nature of the situation.  Ensure that the Time-Keeping Unit processes all timesheets and travel expense claims promptly.  Ensure that the Finance Section provides administrative support to other EOC Sections as needed.  Ensure that all documentation is accurately maintained during the response and submitted on the appropriate forms to Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and/or California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES). City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 4 of 10 Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 5 of 10 C. Time Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Finance/Administration Section Coordinator The Time Unit Leader is responsible for tracking Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Staff time and coordinating with the Cost Accounting Unit Leader on monetary issues related to EOC Staff time. 2. Responsibilities a. Track, record an d report all on-duty time for personnel working during the disaster. Maintain a copy of the EOC sign-in sheet. b. Ensure that personnel time records, travel expense claims and other related forms are prepared and submitted to the City of San Luis Obispo’s Finance Department. Time Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and the all Staff EOC checklist.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Finance/ Section Coordinator. Operational Phase Actions  Track and record all EOC Staff time.  Provide input to the Cost Accounting Unit Leader on time keeping requirements for the emergency period.  Coordinate with the Personnel Unit Leader to ensure all personnel requested by the EOC to participate in the response, have time keeping records.  Advise the Finance/Administration and Logistics Section Coordinators of staff time issues affecting recovery.  Provide a final report to the Personnel Unit Leader on EOC personnel time and expense. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 6 of 10 Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 7 of 10 D. Compensation/Claims Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Finance/Administration Section Coordinator The Compensation/Claims Unit Leader is responsible for processing all insurance and worker’s compensation claims, investigating worker’s compensation claims, tracking the claims and coordinating with the Cost Accounting Unit Leader on all claims. 2. Responsibilities a. Coordinate with City of San Luis Obispo departments and agencies involved in the incident to ensure they document and investigate injuries and property/equipment damage claims involving the City and arising out of the response and recovery. b. Coordinate with the Personnel Unit to track estimated costs of worker’s Compensation claims. Compensation/Claims Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator. Operational Phase Actions  Ensure that all insurance claims for property sustaining physical damages are properly prepared, filed and coordinated.  Ensure that all workers’ compensation claims are properly prepared, investigated with the Safety/Security Officer, filed and tracked.  Process, track and record all jurisdictional insurance claims resulting from the emergency/disaster. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 8 of 10 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Provide input to the Cost Accounting Unit Leader on claims record keeping requirements for the emergency response period.  Provide a final report to the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator, Cost Accounting Unit Leader on total reimbursements from insurance claims and expenditures related to worker’s compensation claims. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 9 of 10 E. Cost Accounting Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Finance/Administration Section Coordinator The Cost Accounting Unit Leader is the coordinator of expenditures for jurisdictional emergency response and recovery activities and serves as the focal point for reporting summarized response cost and loss estimate information to the Emergency Services Director. The Cost Accounting Unit Leader coordinates information for the jurisdiction with County, State and Federal representatives on cost, time, procurement and claims activity for timelines and consistency. Cost Accounting Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator.  Obtain the internal activity number for the disaster from your Section Coordinator for the purpose of tracking purchase orders and cost recovery. Operational Phase Actions  Provide information to the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator on the financial record keeping requirements for the emergency period.  Manage all financial aspects of the emergency including emergency response activities, damage, repair/replacement estimates and recovery activities.  Maintain financial records of the emergency.  Advise the Emergency Services Director, and Finance/Administration Section Coordinator on cost accounting issues, as requested. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Finance and Administration Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 6 Issue Date Review Date Revision D ate EOC Finance and Administration Position Checklist Page 10 of 10 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Gather and analyze information on expenditures, revenues, reimbursements and mitigation program applications and grants.  Ensure that all obligation documents initiated during the operation are properly prepared and completed.  Develop reimbursement plans and begin compiling reimbursement claims for submission to the proper agencies.  In conjunction with all Section Coordinators determine reimbursable costs and generate the necessary forms or paperwork to recover these moneys.  Determine reimbursable EOC Staff costs and generate the necessary forms or paperwork to recover these moneys, in conjunction with the Time Unit Leader and Section Coordinators, as appropriate.  Ensure the Supply/Procurement Unit Leader provides copies of all purchases made in support of the incident.  Develop a final report on monetary issues.  Process claims for reimbursement as needed.  Provide a final report to the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator, Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator on total costs and reimbursement programs. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 1 of 15 A. Description and Organizational Chart 1. The Planning/Intelligence Section is responsible for gathering, analyzing, evaluating, and disseminating technical information and making recommendations to the Emergency Services Director. While Operations is concerned with immediate strategic response to the disaster, Planning is looking and planning ahead. Planning’s function is to maintain information on the overall response effort and to develop the EOC Incident Action Plan for the next operational period. The major responsibilities of this Section are: a. Situation status, including information gathering, verification, status reporting, and maintaining maps and displays. b. Damage Assessment, including information gathering, verification, and reporting. c. Documentation. d. Briefing EOC staff. e. Developing the Incident Action Plan (IAP). f. Advanced Planning. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 2 of 15 2. The following organizational chart details the Planning/Intelligence Section Planning/Intel Section Situation/Status Unit Resource Unit Documentation Unit GIS/Mapping Unit Damage Assessment Tech/Specialist City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 3 of 15 B. Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Emergency Services Director The Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator is responsible for tracking the emergency and providing information to the Emergency Services Director. The Sections Coordinator is also responsible for the development of the Incident Action Plan for emergency response, the plan for demobilization of emergency operations, and the Recovery Plan. The Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator manages the activities of the following units: Situation/Status, Advanced Planning, Documentation and GIS/Mapping. 2. Responsibilities a. Ensure that the Planning/Intelligence function is carried out within the EOC. b. Exercise overall responsibility for Planning/Intelligence Section activities. c. Ensure that objectives and assignments identified in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) is carried out effectively. d. Establish the appropriate level of organization within the Planning/Intelligence Section, continuously monitoring their effectiveness and modifying accordingly. e. Prepare periodic Situation Reports. f. Prepare and distribute the Incident Action Plan (IAP) and facilitate the Incident Action Planning meeting. g. Conduct Advance Planning activities. h. Provide technical support services to the various EOC sections, branches and units in documenting and maintaining files on all EOC activities. i. Keeps the Emergency Services Director informed of all significant issues affecting the Planning/Intelligence Section. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 4 of 15 Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC checklists.  Ensure that Section Position Logs (ICS Form 214) and other necessary files are maintained.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Emergency Services Director.  Ensure that the Planning/Intelligence Section is set up properly and that appropriate personnel, equipment and supplies are in place.  Meet with Operations Section Coordinator; obtain and review any major incident reports.  Activate organizational elements and functions within the section, staff as appropriate and designate leaders for each element.  Ensure the section is properly staffed for 24-hour operations.  Continuously monitor the effectiveness of the section and make changes as required. o Situation/Status Unit o Advanced Planning Unit o Documentation Unit o GIS/Mapping Unit Operational Phase Actions  Coordinate the determination of the nature, scope and severity of the emergency.  Ensure the Situation/Status Unit submits an initial situation status report to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC as soon after activation as possible.  Lead ongoing situation briefings.  Oversee the preparation of the Incident Action Plan (IAP), including assembly of information on alternative strategies and incorporation of supporting plans.  Oversee the establishment of contact with the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC and the receipt of Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) Situation Status Reports.  Establish special information collection activities as necessary, e.g., weather, fire, etc.  Ensure that periodic situation reports are prepared and provided to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC.  Ensure that information on the status of resources, services and operations in the jurisdiction is maintained and current. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 5 of 15  Ensure that Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and other technical support services are provided to the various organizational elements within the EOC.  Ensure the Advanced Planning Unit assists in the development of the Recovery Plan.  Advise the Emergency Services Director and on Planning/Intelligence issues regarding recovery. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 6 of 15 C. Situation/Status Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator The Situation/Status Unit Leader is responsible for: the collection and consolidation of initial reconnaissance information from Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Staff, evaluating and displaying information, preparing consolidated reports for the Command Group and transmitting the reports to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) (OA) EOC. 2. Responsibilities a. Oversee the collection, organization and analysis of disaster situation information. b. Ensure that information collected from all sources is validated prior to posting on status boards or entering Web EOC. c. Ensure that an Incident Action Plan (IAP) is developed, if possible, for each operational period, based on objectives developed by each EOC Section. d. Ensure the Situation Report is sent to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 7 of 15 Situation/Status Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator.  Ensure that there is adequate staff available to collect and analyze incoming information, maintain the Situation Status Report and facilitate the Incident Action Plan (IAP) planning process.  Ensure that appropriate maps are set up.  Collect and consolidate initial information from EOC Staff Members, as well as information from all other available reliable sources, on damage to public and private sector property, loss of life and injury and status of continued occupancy of facilities and structures. Operational Phase Actions  Identify the location of greatest impact, progress of the disaster and development of related events (e.g., earthquake causing hazardous materials incidents).  Prepare a Situation Report for the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator on the status of the emergency (area affected, resources available and resources committed). Provide a copy to the Public Information Officer (PIO) as background information for the PIO’s use in media briefing.  Prepare and submit to the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC, if possible, Situation Report Forms as follows: o Initial report within four hours. o Subsequent reports to be submitted as conditions warrant (i.e. any significant changes, but at least once an operational period).  Supervise staff in the preparation and maintenance of visual displays, charts and maps, (including the areas involved in the emergency, impacted areas, damage incurred and resource allocation and deployment).  Advise the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator on situation analysis issues regarding recovery. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 8 of 15 Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 9 of 15 D. Advanced Planning Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator The Advanced Planning Unit Leader is responsible for looking ahead in the operation and identifying issues that will have to be addressed by the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and coordinating with the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator to develop a Recovery Plan. 2. Responsibilities a. Development of an Advance Plan consisting of potential response and recovery related issues likely to occur beyond the next operational period, generally within 36 to 72 hours, and beyond. b. Review all available status reports, Incident Action Plan (IAP)s and other significant documents for anything requiring consideration in the Advance Plan. c. Determine potential future impacts of the disaster; particularly issues which might modify the overall strategic objectives of the EOC. d. Provide periodic briefings for the Emergency Services Director and Section Coordinators addressing Advance Planning issues. Advanced Planning Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 10 of 15 Operational Phase Actions  Ensure that forecasts and plans are available in a timely manner to the EOC for operational and recovery planning, policy making and development of public information materials.  Work with the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator in the development of the Recovery Plan.  Develop an Advance Plan identifying future policy related issues, social and economic impacts, significant response or recovery resource needs and any other key issues likely to affect EOC operations within a 36 to 96-hour time frame.  Submit the Advance Plan to the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator for review and approval prior to conducting briefings for the Section Coordinators and Emergency Services Director. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 11 of 15 E. Documentation Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator The Documentation Unit Leader assists in documenting operational activities, maintaining Emergency Operations Center (EOC) activation records and preparing a case file for the emergency. 2. Responsibilities a. Collect, organize and file all completed disaster related forms, to include: all EOC Position Logs (ICS Form 214), Situation Status Reports, Incident Action Plan (IAP)s and any other related information, just prior to the end of each operational period. b. Provide documentation reproduction services to EOC Staff. c. Coordinate with the Situation/Status Unit Leader to distribute EOC Situation Status Reports, Incident Action Plans (IAP) and other documents, as required. d. Maintain a permanent electronic archive of all Situation Reports and Incident Action Plans (IAP) associated with the disaster. e. Assist the Emergency Services Director in the preparation and distribution of the After-Action/Improvement Report. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 12 of 15 Documentation Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator.  Begin running history of EOC activities.  Establish pre-designated documentation filing system for: o Proclamations o Advance Plans o Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) Jurisdiction Activation forms o Letters/memos o Situation Reports o Road Closures o News Releases o Weather Reports o Briefings o Message Forms o Notification System Logs o Activity Logs o Event Logs o E-mails o EAS (Emergency Alert System) o Messages Operational Phase Actions  Maintain all EOC materials as official records.  Maintain accurate, up to date EOC activity files.  Maintain master copies of messages and activity logs.  Store EOC files for legal, analytical and historical purposes.  Meet with the Finance/Administration Section Coordinator to determine what EOC materials and documents are necessary to provide accurate records and documentation for recovery purposes.  Initiate and maintain a roster of all activated EOC positions to ensure that activity logs are accounted for and submitted to the Documentation Unit at the end of each shift.  Review records for accuracy and completeness. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 13 of 15 Operational Phase Actions (continued)  Assist with the development of the Demobilization and Recovery Plans.  Begin preparation of the After-Action Report.  Request copies of After-Action Reports from the Operational Area (San Luis Obispo County) EOC.  Collect all documentation, including e-mails, notes, documents, logs, and electronic files from all EOC Staff before the respective EOC staff position is demobilized. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 14 of 15 F. GIS/Mapping Unit Leader 1. Position Description Responsible Party: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Alternate: As Appointed by the Emergency Services Director Reports to: Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator The GIS/Mapping Unit Leader is responsible for providing Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Staff with subject matter expertise during response incidents that require technical assistance to mitigate hazards and/or ensure personnel safety. 2. Responsibilities a. Provide technical observations and recommendations to the Emergency Services Director in specialized areas, as required. b. Ensure that qualified specialists are available in the areas required by the event. c. Ensure mapping (Geographic Information System, if possible) capabilities and services are available and maintained. d. Arrive at the EOC with all technical tools and resources necessary to ensure appropriate set-up of work area. (i.e., software, laptop, reference manuals, etc.) GIS/Mapping Unit Leader Checklist Activation Phase Actions  Review this and All Staff EOC Checklists.  Report to and obtain initial situation briefing from the Planning/Intelligence Section Coordinator.  Set-up work area, including any equipment and materials necessary to your technical services specialty. City of San Luis Obispo Emergency Operations Center Plans and Intelligence Description-Organization-Position Checklists Section 7 Issue Date Review Date Revision Date EOC Plans and Intelligence Position Checklists Page 15 of 15 Operational Phase Actions  Provide technical assistance to the EOC Staff as requested.  Coordinate with the Logistics Section to ensure that technical staff are located and mobilized.  Assign technical staff to assist the Logistics Section in interpreting specialized resource requests. Deactivation Phase  Demobilize when authorized by your supervisor.  Ensure that any open actions are handled by the appropriate section or transferred to other EOC elements as appropriate.  Ensure that all required forms and reports are completed, close out activity logs, and provide all documentation to the Documentation Unit prior to your release and departure from the EOC. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 1 of 36 City of San Luis Obispo Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan DEBRIS MANAGEMENT Developed for: Keith Aggson Fire Chief City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department San Luis Obispo, CA. Prepared by: David L. Mathe Emergency Leadership and Preparedness Advisor Nipomo, CA. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 2 of 36 FORWARD PURPOSE • To provide policies and guidance to the City of San Luis Obispo for the removal and disposition of debris caused by a major disaster. • To facilitate and coordinate the management of debris following a disaster in order to mitigate against any potential threat to the lives, health, safety, and welfare of the impacted citizens, expedite recovery efforts in the impacted area, and address any threat of significant damage to improved public or private property. Debris Management Authority In the event of a disaster that requires debris management, the Public Works Department will assume the position of Debris Management Coordinators. If Public Works is unavailable, their designee will become the City of San Luis Obispo's Debris Management Coordinators as appointed by the Emergency Services Director. Emergency Operations Center Leadership The City Manager is the Emergency Services Director. The Assistant City Manager is the Deputy Emergency Services Director. _______________________ Keith Aggson Fire Chief San Luis Obispo Fire Department Public Works Department Date: City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 3 of 36 Debris Management Table of Contents 1. Applicant Eligibility 4 2. Concept of Operations 5 3. Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction (TSDR) Sites 6 4. Debris Removal 7 5. Eligible Work 9 6. Debris Reduction Methods 17 7. Demolition of a Damaged Public Facility or Privately Owned Building 20 8. Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction Site Closeout Procedures 22 9. Debris Forecasting and Estimating 23 10. Debris Monitoring 30 11. Organization and Responsibilities 34 12. Administration and Logistics 34 13. Authorities, References and Regulations 34 City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 4 of 36 1. Applicant Eligibility In addition to the debris removal regulations, to be eligible for assistance, activities must satisfy the general work eligibility regulations. An item of work must:  Be required as the result of the major disaster event,  Be located within a designated disaster area, and  Be the legal responsibility of an eligible applicant. Public Interest is defined as work necessary to:  Eli minate immediate threats to life, public health, and safety; or  Eliminate immediate threats of significant damage to improved public or private property; or  The debris must pose an immediate threat. Debris that would not otherwise result in harm is not eligible for removal. The eligibility of the activities must address public health and safety. Close attention must be paid to whether these conditions are met, especially when considering debris removal from private property. State - The California Disaster Assistance Act (CDAA) § 2900  Eligible applicant means any local agency (city, city & county, county, county office of education, community college district, school district, or special district). Federal - 44 CFR 206  Debris removal activities are eligible for both public and private non-profit applicants. There are four types of eligible applicants for public assistance. If an entity meets the requirements of one of the types, the applicant may be eligible to receive federal disaster assistance.  State Government Agencies  Local Governments and Special Districts Any county, city, village, town, district, or other political subdivision of any state and includes any rural community, unincorporated town or village, or other public entity for which an application for assistance is made by a state or political subdivision thereof. o Other sta te and local political subdivisions may be eligible if they are formed in accordance with state law as a separate entity and have taxing authority. These include, but are not limited to, school districts, irrigation districts, fire districts, and Public Works districts. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 5 of 36  Private Non-Profit Organizations Private non-profit organizations or institutions that own or operate facilities that are open to the general public and that provide certain services otherwise performed by a government agency. These services include: o Education  Colleges and universities  Parochial and other private schools o Public Works  Systems of energy, communication, water supply, sewage collection and treatment, or other similar public service facilities. o Emergency  Fire protection, ambulance, rescue, and similar emergency services. o Medical Hospital  Outpatient facility, rehabilitation facility, or facility for long-term care for mental or physical injury or disease. o Custodial Care  Homes for the elderly and similar facilities that provide institutional care for persons who require close supervision, but do not require day-to-day medical care. o Other Essential Governmental Services  Museums, community centers, libraries, and facilities that provide health and safety services of a governmental nature.  Health and safety services are essential services that are commonly provided by San Luis Obispo and directly affect the health and safety of individuals.  Low-income housing, alcohol and drug rehabilitation, programs for battered spouses, transportation to medical facilities, and food programs are examples of health services. 2. Concept of Operations Estimating the Type and Amount of Debris (Also see Debris Forecasting and Estimating)  Designated Public Works Department personnel will de termine the estimated amount of debris generated as soon as possible.  One or all of the following estimating methods may be used: o Conduct a drive through “windshield” damage assessment and estimate the amount of debris visually from the ground. o Conduct an aerial assessment by flying over the area using, California Highway Patrol, and/or National Guard helicopters and Civil Air Patrol reconnaissance flights. o The damaged area can be assessed either visually or using aerial photography. Once the area has been assessed actions can be taken to implement Phase I debris clearing procedures and institute requests for additional state or federal assistance. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 6 of 36 3. Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction (TDSR) Sites Site Selection Priorities  Determine the number of Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction (TDSR) sites and location of these sites for the collection and processing of debris.  Prioritize which sites will be opened based on the amount of debris estimated. o First Priority: Pre-determined Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction sites o Second Priority: Public property within the damaged area o Last Priority: Private property Pre-Designated Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction (TDSR) sites  The City of San Luis Obispo does not own any pre-identified Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction sites.  Public Works Department shall maintain detailed environmental and safety information pertaining to each of these sites. o Detail shall include exact location, size, available ingress and egress routes and results of an environmental assessment and initial data samples. o Baseline data should include videotapes, photographs, documentation of physical and biological features, and soil and water samplings of city owned Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction sites just prior to these properties being used for temporary debris storage and reduction.  This list of Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction sites should be reviewed annually and updated as necessary as part of the Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan, Debris Management Plan component. Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction (TDSR) Site Preparation  A baseline data should include videotapes, photographs, documentation of physical and biological features, and soil and water samplings of Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction sites just prior to these properties being used for temporary debris storage and reduction.  Debris management personnel are responsible for updating the initial base line data and develop an operation layout to include ingress and egress routes of their temporary debris storage and reduction facilities, once they are activated as part of an incident response or recovery. Existing Landfills  The City of San Luis Obispo has the capacity to accept the following materials for recycling: cardboard, green waste, wood waste, white goods (i.e., washers/dryers, refrigerators, etc.), electronic waste, tires, concrete, top soil, scrap metal, motor oil, oil filters, antifreeze and batteries. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 7 of 36 4. Debris Removal General  Earthquakes, floods, and other natural disasters can generate unprecedented amounts of debris in a few hours or a few minutes. The debris may be heavy depending on the magnitude of the tree blow-down and associated structural damage such as homes, businesses, utilities and signs. This section provides guidelines on debris removal issues, including emergency roadway clearance, public rights-of-way removal, mobile home park removal, private property removal, and Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) removal.  Debris removal, regardless of source, becomes a high priority following a disaster. Debris management strategy for a large-scale debris removal operation divides the operation into two phases. o Phase I consists of the clearance of the debris that hinders immediate life saving actions being taken within the disaster area and the clearance of that debris which poses an immediate threat to public health and safety. o Phase II operations consist of the removal and disposal of that debris which is determined necessary to ensure the orderly recovery of the community and to eliminate less immediate threats to public health and safety. Emergency Roadway Debris Removal (Phase I)  Identify critical routes that are essential to emergency operations.  Define how efforts will be prioritized between local agencies.  Identifying areas that state and federal assistance can target.  Define what actions take place during Phase I. o Example: Roadway debris removal involves the opening of arterial roads and collector streets by moving debris to the shoulders of the road. There is no attempt to physically remove or dispose of the debris, only to clear key access routes to expedite the:  Movement of emergency vehicles,  Law enforcement,  Resumption of critical services and,  Assessment of damage to key public facilities and utilities such as schools, medical hospitals, government buildings, and municipal owned utilities.  Define the type of debris that may be encountered such as tree blow-down and broken limbs; yard trash such as outdoor furniture, trash cans, Public Works poles, power, telephone and cable TV lines, transformers and other electrical devices; building debris such as roofs, sheds and signs; and personal property such as clothing, appliances, boats, cars, trucks and trailers.  Define the priority to open access to other critical community facilities, such as municipal buildings, water treatment plants, wastewater treatment plants, power generation units, and airports.  The requirement for government services will be increased drastically following a major natural disaster. Develop procedures to determine the damage done to Public Works systems. Activities involving these facilities should be closely coordinated with their owners and/or operators. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 8 of 36 Local, County, State, and Federal Assistance  Identify local, county, State, and Federal government assets that may be available such as: o Municipal workers and equipment o Local and CalTrans workers and equipment o National Guard o Local contractors o U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service chain saw crews o Local U.S. Army Corps of Engineers workers and equipment o Supervision and Special Considerations  Immediate debris clearing (Phase I) actions should be supervised by the Public Works Department personnel using all available resources. Requests for additional assistance and resources should be made via the San Luis Obispo EOC to the Operational Area (OA) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) who will request additional resources from the state EOC. Requests for federal assistance will be requested through the State Coordinating Officer (SCO) to the FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO).  Special crews equipped with chain saws may be required to cut up downed trees. This activity is hazardous, and common-sense safety considerations are necessary to reduce the chance of injury and possible loss of life. When live electric lines are involved, work crews should coordinate with local power companies to have power lines de-energized for safety reasons.  Front-end loaders and dozers should be equipped with protective cabs. Driveway cutouts, fire hydrants, valves, and storm water inlets should be left unobstructed. All personnel should wear protective gear, such as hard hats, gloves, goggles, and safety shoes.  The USDA Forest Service and other state and federal land management agencies are equipped for fast responses to tornadoes, and windstorms. Assistance would be requested through the San Luis Obispo County Office of Emergency Services according to standard procedures. Public Rights-of -Way Debris Removal and Disposal (Phase II)  Debris is simply pushed to the shoulders of the roadway during the emergency opening (Phase I) of key routes. There is little time or concern for sorting debris at that time. The objective is to provide for the safe movement of emergency and support vehicles into and out of the disaster area. As removal operations progress, the initial roadside piles of debris become the dumping location for additional yard waste and other storm-generated debris, such as construction material, personal property, trash, white metals such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and hot water heaters, roofing and even household, commercial, and agricultural chemicals.  Determine if local contractors will be needed to assist in Phase II operations.  Determine if additional state and/or federal assistance will be required.  Develop local field inspection teams. The teams become the “eyes and ears” for the Debris Management Task Force.  Coordinate through local agencies and the EOC to establish a contracted work force capable of expeditious removal of the debris.  Develop an independent team using the local and state personnel to monitor the removal activities. This team becomes the debris manager’s “eyes and ears” in the field.  Conduct daily update briefings with key debris managers. Ensure that all major debris removal and disposal actions are reviewed and approved by the local debris manager.  Ensure that a representative of the Debris Management Task Force attends all briefings to resolve any coordination problems between state and federal debris removal efforts and local debris removal and disposal efforts. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 9 of 36  Coordinate with local law enforcement and CalTrans authorities to ensure that traffic control measures expedite debris removal activities.  Establish a proactive information management plan. Emphasis should be placed on actions that the public can perform to expedite the cleanup process, such as separating burnable and non- burnable debris; segregating Household Hazardous Waste (HHW); placing debris at the curbside; keeping debris piles away from fire hydrants and valves, reporting locations of illegal dump sites or incidents of illegal dumping; and segregating recyclable materials.  The public should be kept informed of debris pick-up schedules, disposal methods and ongoing actions to comply with Environmental regulations, disposal procedures for self-help and independent contractors, and restrictions and penalties for creating illegal dumps. The Public Information Officer (PIO) should be prepared to respond to questions pertaining to debris removal from the press and residents. The following questions are likely to be asked: o What is the pick-up system? o When will the contractor be in my area? o Who are the contractors and how can I contact them? o Should I separate the different debris materials and how? o How do I handle Household Hazardous Waste? o What if I am elderly or have access or functional needs? 5. Eligible Work Under a federal declaration, debris can be removed when necessary to ensure economic recovery of the community-at-large. This is generally defined as removing debris from commercial areas to expedite economic recovery. It does not mean general debris removal from private property. Note: The terms immediate threat, public health and community-at-large are very important in assessing eligibility. This is el igible only under a federal declaration and is not an option under the California Disaster Assistance Act (CDAA). Roads In large debris generating disasters, much of the debr is that requires clearance and possible removal in the early stages of the event is that deposited on roadways, thus requiring removal for emergency access. In general, debris on public property that must be removed to allow safe operation of governmental functions or to alleviate an immediate threat is eligible. Public Roads  Generally, debris that is blocking streets and highways is considered a threat to public health and safety because it blocks passage of emergency vehicles or it blocks access to emergency facilities such as medical hospitals.  Debris may be removed from travel lanes, shoulders, roadside ditches and drainage features, and maintained rights-of-way. Federal-Aid Systems Roads  Federal-Aid System Roads are under the authority of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). However, as of October 1, 2012, the FHWA Emergency Relief (ER) Program will not aid with debris removal on Federal-aid highways in jurisdictions designated for FEMA Public Assistance. (FEMA Recovery Fact Sheet 9580.214) City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 10 of 36  Any debris removal funded by FEMA must meet the eligibility, procurement and documentation requirements established in the Stafford Act (See 44 CFR Part 206).  This change applies only to debris removal and does not affect any other categories of PA work. Permanent work on Federal-aid highways is still not eligible for Public Assistance funding. Water Control Facilities  Water control facilities naturally collect debris and sediment on a regular basis, requiring maintenance of the facilities to maintain their function.  Therefore, when evaluating debris removal eligibility from such facilities, it is necessary for the applicant to provide documentation to demonstrate the portion of the existing debris that was generated by the disaster. Evidence of a formal maintenance program and records of the program being implemented is often required.  Although the applicant may choose to remove all debris, pre-disaster and disaster-related, only the disaster-related debris quantities are eligible, and generally, only that portion that is necessary to remove the threat. Debris Basins, Drainage/Irrigation Channels  Removal of silt, mud and other debris from lined and unlined basins and engineered channels may be eligible if the pre-disaster level of debris can be determined. Such facilities must have a regular schedule of debris removal. Natural Streams  CDAA does not fund work done in natural streams, only for man-made facilities.  Under 44 CFR 206, eligible debris removal from a stream is limited to the minimum effort required to eliminate an immediate threat to life, public health, and safety, or debris that is immediately up/down stream of and near improved property.  Debris removal from a stream by an applicant for which another federal agency has specific authority, is ineligible under the Public Assistance Program, except for limited debris removal that is: o Reasonably necessary to eliminate an immediate threat to life, public health and safety, OR o Located immediately up/down stream of or near improved property and which poses an immediate threat of significant damage to that property; AND o The other federal agency is not aiding for the activity.  The removal of trees still rooted to an embankment may be eligible if: o The tree is partially or wholly floating or submerged in the waterway; and o The tree presents an immediate threat to life, public health, and safety; and o Another federal agency does not have specific authority to fund or perform the work. Note: In such cases, FEMA may determine that the cost to cut the floating or submerged portion of the tree at the water’s edge is eligible. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 11 of 36 Buildings  Removal of mud and silt, or similar disaster-related debris in and on buildings is eligible.  If furnishings from public buildings are damaged to the point where they become debris, they are eligible for removal and disposal if brought to the curb.  Sometimes, public facilities are damaged to the point that demolition is necessary for public health and safety. o State and federal policy on demolition must be reviewed for these situations.  Insurance is a large consideration in building debris removal and demolition activities.  Debris resulting from permanent repair activities is not eligible as Category A but would be eligible under the permanent repair efforts. Utilities  Generally, debris removal from eligible utilities also will be eligible.  Some materials may be salvageable.  Environmental issues may be present – such as PCB filled transformers. Parks and Recreation Areas  The removal of debris from parks and recreational areas used by the public is eligible when it affects public health or safety or proper utilization of such facilities.  Recreational facilities are not eligible private non-profit facilities. Therefore, debris would only be eligible in accordance with the eligibility criteria for private property. Private Property Debris Removal  Dangerous structures should be the responsibility of the owner or the city to demolish on order to protect the health and safety of adjacent residents. However, experience has shown that unsafe structures will remain because of the lack of insurance, absentee landlords, or under- staffed and under-equipped San Luis Obispo personnel. Consequently, demolition of these structures may become the responsibility of the Debris Management Task Force.  Develop procedures to ensure complete cooperation with numerous local, county and state government officials to include the following: real estate offices, local law and/or code enforcement agencies, State historic preservation office, qualified contractors to remove Household Hazardous Waste (HHW), asbestos, lead-based paint, and field teams to photograph the sites before and after demolition.  Include a copy of Demolition of Private Property checklist.  Include copies of sample ordinances that can be activated when a “state of emergency” is implemented, eliminating any unnecessary waiting period.  The City of San Luis Obispo addressed Private Property Debris Removal in its Municipal Code, Title 8 - Health and Safety Zoning. In addition, Chapter 17 of the Municipal Code should be consulted when dealing with debris removal. Close coordination is essential, and it is recommended that at least one FEMA staff person be on site to work directly with the San Luis Obispo staff to ensure tha t all required legal actions are taken. Reimbursement for removal of debris from private property can only be performed under specific circumstances and only with prior state and/or federal approval. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 12 of 36 State Regulations for Private Property Debris Removal Under state regulations, debris removal from private property is reimbursable only when there is an immediate threat to life, public health and safety. o Title 19, Section 2925 (2) (A-C)) does allow for the removal of debris under the following: (1) For purposes of this program, the removal of debris from private property shall be reimbursed only when there is an immediate threat to public health and safety. In a case where reimbursement for debris removal from private property is authorized by the agency secretary, the following requirements shall apply, unless waived in part or full by the agency secretary: • The property owner must remove all disaster-related debris from the property to the curb or public right-of-way. • The local agency must obtain a signed statement from the property owner to the effect that the property owner does not have insurance covering the removal of the disaster-related debris; and, • The local agency must have a signed statement from the property owner giving the local agency the right of entry and absolving the local agency and the state of any liability relative to removal. (a) Criteria Debris removal shall be considered necessary when removal will: • Eliminate immediate threats to life, public health, and safety. • Elimi nate immediate threats of significant damage to improved public or private property, or, • Be necessary for the permanent repair, restoration, or reconstruction of damaged public facilities. Examples of Eligible Work. • Removing debris such as pieces of destroyed buildings, structures, signs, or broken Public Works poles. • Removing loose or broken sidewalks and driveways; or, • Removing fallen trees. Federal Regulations for Private Property Debris Removal (Stafford Act Sections 403 and 407 and 44 CFR 206.224(b)) provide the authority to fund eligible applicants to remove debris from private property. This work may only be eligible when:  The disaster caused very severe and widespread damage.  The removal is necessary to eliminate an immediate threat to life, public health and safety or to improve public or private property, or to ensure the economic recovery of the affected community to the benefit of the community-at-large.  An eligible applicant, such as a municipal or county government, performs the work.  The private property owner has provided all insurance information.  It is pre-approved by the FEMA Regional Director and/or Federal Disaster Recovery Manager (DRM).  Required legal documents are in place: o Insurance documents. o Hold Harmless Agreement; and City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 13 of 36 o Right-of-Entry Agreement. In federally declared events, applicants and property owners must be aware that only FE MA makes eligibility determinations regarding removal of debris from private property. Not all actions that may be taken by San Luis Obispo are eligible for FEMA assistance. Demonstrating a Threat on Private Property Remember, the reason to undertake a debris removal operation is to remove and immediate threat to the public health and safety, not because it’s an “ugly nuisance”. When it comes to private property, an applicant must demonstrate that removal of debris on private property is required to reduce this threat.  A resolution after a disaster by an applicant that debris on private property constitutes a threat to public health and safety does not in itself make the debris removal eligible. o The applicant should submit for review and approval specific legal requirements for declaring the existence of the threat.  A damaged structure may be a public health and safety hazard if it could be condemned as such, pursuant to the provisions of an applicant’s ordinance related to condemnation of damaged structures. A qualified individual, such as a certified building inspector, must make this determination.  A public health hazard may exist if such a determination is made pursuant to the provision of an applicant’s ordinance related to public health. An individual qualified to do so, such as a public health official, must make such a determination.  The determination of work being required to ensure economic recovery must be carefully reviewed. o Use of this criterion is normally restricted to the removal of disaster-related debris from large commercial areas to expedite restoration of the economic viability of the affected community. Unique Eligibility Issues Mobile Homes In California, the Department of Housing and Community Development oversees mobile homes.  During many disasters, there may be many mobile homes demolished.  The eligibility for mobile home removal should be evaluated as for any other residential structure – removal may be eligible if a threat can be demonstrated – but there are some unique aspects to the units themselves. o Before demolition begins, the applicant should decide to be sure remaining personal items, furniture, etc. that may remain in the units are removed. o Check the units for asbestos and lead paint, and any other Household Hazardous Waste. o Units may need to be crushed or taken apart – few landfills will accept the units intact. o Caltrans may have regulations relating to hauling demolished mobile homes on state/federal highways. o Consider salvage of the metal components. Mobile homes may present unique cleanup situations. Mobile homes are normally treated as private property and should be removed with the owner’s insurance proceeds. However, in some instances, City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 14 of 36 there will be a need to quickly install replacement mobile homes resulting in the damaged mobile home debris being bulldozed to the right-of-way. In addition, mobile homes in a mobile home park are generally not eligible for public assistance as the mobile home park is considered a business. Trees, Limbs and Stumps  Hazardous trees, limbs and stumps on public property within or adjacent to improved or publicly used space, and on private property that meet criteria of posing a threat, may be eligible for removal. Examples include: o Trees alongside public roadways. o Trees within a naturalized area of public parks or golf courses. o Trees within private property posing a threat to health and public safety or to damage to residences.  Hazardous trees that are unstable and leaning into the areas used by the public are eligible for removal. Normally, trees requiring removal are flush cut to the ground.  A tree with more than 50% of the tree crown destroyed or damaged, a split trunk, or broken branches that expose the heartwood, or a tree that has been felled or uprooted is eligible for removal, especially if it is in a location approximate to or within public-use areas. o If an applicant chooses to save a tree that has any conditions described above that justify its removal, the expense is the applicant’s.  Hazardous limbs are also eligible for removal. Hazardous limbs considered to pose a threat are those that are still hanging in the tree and are threatening a public-use area, such as a trail, sidewalk, road or golf cart path, or other improved and maintained property.  Removal of fallen trees in a forested or wilderness area is not normally eligible.  Removal of cut trees from subdivisions under development or off the right-of-way in rural areas is typically not eligible, as this condition generally does not pose an immediate threat.  Reimbursement for stump removal is extremely limited. o Normally, reimbursement is limited to removing stumps that have been uprooted and are in an area where they would be a safety hazard. If a tree has been broken, instead of uprooted, the “stump hazard” is removed by cutting the tree at ground level. Animal Removal  Disposal of companion animals present unique challenges.  Local emergency managers need to be involved if extensive numbers of dead animals are found.  Because of potential health issues, disposal of dead animals needs to be addressed quickly.  Disposal methods, burning or burying, need to be coordinated with appropriate environmental agencies.  A specialty contractor may be needed to appropriately pick-up, haul and dispose of the animals. Note: California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) has lists of venders for various areas on their websi te (www.calrecycle.ca.gov). City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 15 of 36 Curbside Pickup Generally, disaster-related debris from private property must be brought to the curbside and collected by an eligible applicant.  Construction and demolition materials from repairs and reconstruction should not be placed at curbside.  Items such as grass-clippings, household garbage, automobile parts, are not eligible.  Residents should not mix normal garbage with disaster debris. Normal garbage pickup schedules should resume as soon as possible.  Segregation of the types of debris will make the process go smoother and faster. o Applicants may be asked to separate their debris into the following categories.  Woody debris and yard waste.  Household waste (damaged personal goods).  Household Hazardous Waste (HHW); and  Construction and Demolition (C&D) waste (removed by the homeowner, not as a result of reconstruction).  The city, state, FEMA, should monitor the pickup activities to ensure that eligible materials are being collected and unnecessary mixing of debris does not occur. o The city should work with their state and federal counterparts to establish deadlines for debris pickup. The residents should be informed as soon as possible of the criteria for pickup, schedule and deadlines.  Debris can be removed directly off private property under special circumstances. These instances must be documented. Household Hazardous Wastes Removal  Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) may be generated as a result of a major natural disaster. Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) may consist of common household chemicals, propane tanks, oxygen bottles, batteries, and industrial and agricultural chemicals. These items will be mixed into the debris stream and will require close attention throughout the debris removal and disposal process.  Arrange for salvageable hazardous materials to be collected and segregated based on their intended use. Properly trained personnel or Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) contractors should accomplish removal of hazardous waste. Coordinate with regulatory agencies to ensure cleanup actions meet local, county, state, and federal regulations.  Complete Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) identification and segregation before building demolition begins. Qualified contractors should remove Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) debris. Regular demolition contractors can remove uncontaminated debris.  A separate staging area for Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) materials, contaminated soils, and contaminated debris should be established at each Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction site. The staging area should be lined with an impermeable material and bermed to prevent contamination of the groundwater and surrounding area. Materials should be removed and disposed of using qualified Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) personnel/contractors in accordance with local, county, State and Federal regulations. Major hazardous and toxic waste components are generally the responsibility of the Department of Toxic Substances Control and the Environmental Protection Agency. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 16 of 36 State The Department of Toxic Substances Control regulates the following within the state:  Regulate asbestos. (This could also fall under the Air Resources Board’s jurisdiction, or OSHA’s depending on whether the asbestos is being disposed of or ground up.)  Regulate lead (primarily lead based paint on wood and metal) and Household Hazardous Waste.  Regulate cleanup of hazardous materials. Federal FEMA regulates the following:  The Public Assistance Officer will coordinate with Cal OES and FEMA Headquarters at the beginning of a disaster to determine if there have been any agreements with the EPA on addressing HAZMAT for the specific disaster. o For example, FEMA HQ may determine if retrieving and disposing of orphan drums and barrels will be funded by FEMA or through the EPA.  FEMA generally will fund the removal and disposal of Household Hazardous Waste.  FEMA may provide technical assistance to states on disposal methods.  Activities related to long-term cleanup are generally not eligible for FEMA funding.  Once the debris is removed from the damaged area, it will be taken to temporary debris storage and reduction sites.  Removal and disposal actions should be handled at the lowest level possible based on the magnitude of the event. It follows the normal chain of responsibility, i.e., local level, county level, state level, and when resources are exceeded at each level of responsibility, federal assistance may be requested according to established procedures. Because of the limited debris removal and reduction resources, the establishment and operation of Temporary Debris Storage and Reduction sites are generally accomplished by contracts.  The Debris Management Task Force should review all debris disposal contracts.  Site Preparation. The topography and soil conditions should be evaluated to determine best site layout. Consider ways to make remediation and restoration easier when planning site preparation.  Site Operations. Site preparation and operation are usually left up to the contractor, but guidance can help avoid problems with the ultimate closeout.  Establish lined temporary storage areas for ash, Household Hazardous Waste (HHW), fuels, and other materials that can contaminate soils, groundwater and surface water. Set up plastic liners, when possible, under stationary equipment such as generators and mobile lighting plants. Include this as a requirement of the contract scope of work.  If the site is also an equipment staging area, monitor fueling and equipment repair to prevent and mitigate spills such as petroleum products and hydraulic fluids. Include clauses in contract scope of work to require immediate cleanup by the contractor.  Be aware of and mitigate things that will irritate the neighbors such as: o Smoke – proper construction and operation of incineration pits. Don’t overload air curtains. o Dust – employ water trucks. o Noise – construct perimeter berms. o Traffic – proper layout of ingress and egress procedures to help traffic flow. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 17 of 36 6. Debris Reduction Methods NOTE: INCINERATION METHOD IS FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. IF CONSIDERING INCINERATION PLEASE CONTACT THE COUNTY AIR POLUTION CONTROL DISTRICT. Volume Reduction by Incineration  There are several incineration methods available including uncontrolled open incineration, controlled open incineration, air curtain pit incineration, and refractor lined pit incineration. The Debris Management Task Force should consider each incineration method before selection and implementation as part of the overall volume reduction strategy.  Uncontrolled Open Incineration: Uncontrolled open incineration is the least desirable method of volume reduction because it lacks environmental control. However, in the haste to make progress, waivers to allow this method of reduction early in a disaster.  Controlled Open Incineration: Controlled open incineration is a cost-effective method for reducing clean woody debris in rural areas. This option must be terminated if mixed debris such as treated lumber, poles, nails, bolts, tin and aluminum sheeting enters the waste flow. Clean woody tree debris presents little environmental damage and the local agricultural community can use the resulting ash as a soil additive. Department of Agriculture and county agricultural personnel should be consulted to determine if and how the resulting ash can be recycled as a soil additive.  Air Curtain Pit Incineration: Air curtain pit incineration offers an effective means to expedite the volume reduction process by substantially reducing the environmental concerns caused by open incineration. Specifications and statements of work should be developed to expedite the proper use of the systems, because experience has shown that many contractors and subcontractors are not fully knowledgeable of the system operating parameters.  Refractor Lined Pit Incineration: Pre -manufactured refractory lined pit burners are an alternative to air curtain open pit incineration. The units can be erected on site in a minimal amount of time. Some are portable and others must be built in-place. The units are especially suited for locations with high water tables, sandy soil, or where materials are not available to build above ground pits. The engineered features designed into the units allow for a reduction rate of approximately 95% with a minimum of air pollution. The air curtain traps smoke and small particles and recirculates them to enhance combustion that reaches over 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. Manufacturers claim that combustion rates of about 25 tons per hour are achievable while still meeting emission standards.  Local officials, environmental groups, and local citizens should be thoroughly briefed on the type of incineration method being used, how the systems work, environmental standards, health issues, and the risk associated with each type of incineration. PIOs should take the initiative to keep the public informed. A proactive public information strategy to include press releases and media broadcasts should be included in any operation that envisions incineration as a primary means of volume reduction. City of San Luis Obispo Debris Management Comprehensive Disaster Leadership Plan For official use only 18 of 36 Environmental Controls Environmental controls are essential for all incineration methods, and the following should be considered:  A setback of at least 1,000 feet should be maintained between the debris piles and the incineration area. Keep at least 1,000 feet between the incineration area and the nearest building. Contractors should use fencing and warning signs to keep the public away from the incineration area.  The fire should be extinguished approximately two hours before anticipated removal of the ash mound. The ash mound should be removed when it reaches 2 feet below the lip of the incineration pit.  The incineration area should be placed in an above ground or below ground pit that is no wider than 8 feet and between 9 and 14 feet deep.  The incineration pits should be constructed with limestone and reinforced with earth anchors or wire mesh to support the weight of the loaders. There should be a 1-foot impervious layer of clay or limestone on the bottom of the pit to seal the ash from the aquifer.  The ends of the pits should be sealed with dirt or ash to a height of 4 feet.  A 12-inch dirt seal should be placed on the lip of the incineration pit area to seal the blower nozzle.  The nozzle should be 3 to 6 inches from the end of the pit.  There should be 1-foot high, unburnable warning stops along the edge of the pit’s length to prevent the loader from damaging the lip of the incineration pit.  Hazardous or contaminated ignitable material should not be placed in the pit. This is to prevent contained explosions.  The airflow should hit the wall of the pit about 2 feet below the top edge of the pit, and the debris should not break the path of the airflow except during dumping.  The pit should be no longer than the length of the blower system, and the pit should be loaded uniformly along the length. Volume Reduction by Grinding and Chipping  Various disasters impacting the city may present the opportunity to employ large-scale grinding and chipping operations as part of the overall debris volume reduction strategy. Windstorms can blow away scarce topsoil in the agricultural areas and cause extensive tree damage and blow- down. This two-fold loss, combined with local climatic conditions, may present an excellent opportunity to reduce clean woody debris into suitable mulch that can be used to replenish the topsoil and retain soil moisture.  Grinding and chipping woody debris is a viable reduction method. Although grinding and chipping is more expensive than incineration, it is more environmentally friendly, and the resulting product, mulch, can be recycled. In some locations the mulch will be a desirable product because of shallow