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Request for Information - MCG - Climate Action AccomplishmentsCi f August 2, 2018 To: Mayor/Council Candidates From: Derek Johnson, City Manager Prepared by: Chris Read, Sustainability Manager Subject: Request for Information - Major City Goals and Other Important Objectives and Climate Action Accomplishments Attached please find the Major City Goals Update from June 2018 and a memo regarding the City’s Climate Action Accomplishments. SECTION B: MCG/OIO/PERFORMANCE MEASURES The fundamental purpose of the City’s Financial Plan is to link what the City wants to accomplish over its two-year period with the resources available to do so. The Financial Plan process used by the City Council accomplishes this through a public engagement process that helps the Council identify Major City Goals, establishing a timeframe and organizational responsibility for achieving them, and allocating the resources needed to do so. In order to identify the goals to drive the budget process, the City begins its Financial Plan process by asking its advisory bodies to submit goals, soliciting feedback from the public with a survey, and holding a community forum, in addition to other outreach efforts. This input helps the Council determine the major objectives it wants to accomplish over the next two years in addition to the ongoing services the City provides to the community. At the Goal-Setting Workshop in January 2017, Council established four Major City Goals and one Other Important Council Objective, listed below. The proposed work programs and funding to accomplish the Major City Goals and Other Important Objective are presented in this section. The purpose of this summary is to provide an estimate of progress as of June 20, 2017. 2017-19 MCG ACTION HIGHLIGHTS 2018 Housing 44% Complete Facilitate increased production of all housing types designed to be economically accessible to the area workforce and low and very low-income residents, through increased density and proximity to transportation corridors in alignment with the Climate Action Plan. As of January 2018, the Affordable Housing Fund has a balance of approximately $1.75 million. The City continued to implement the Inclusionary Housing Requirement throughout 2017, and has over 10 Affordability Agreements in process through long-term and equity-share programs. Pursuant to the ongoing zoning regulations update, staff worked closely with the consultant to add workforce housing as an income category in the City’s Zoning Regulations and Affordable Housing Standards. Staff began working with key community stakeholders to develop the resulting workforce housing ordinance, aimed for preliminary review in 2018. Discussion regarding the feasibility and incorporation of smaller housing units to facilitate more affordable options, was also completed alongside the zoning regulations update. Multi-Modal Transportation 40% Complete Prioritize implementation of the Bicycle Master Plan, pedestrian safety, and the Short-Range Transit Plan. Several critical projects were advanced and/or completed thus far in 2018, including: The Calle Joaquin Park and Ride lot opened for service in February 2018. This is the first Park and Ride lot in the City. The City is now working with ReCarGo, the California Energy Commission vendor for the US 101 corridor, to implement EV charging stations in a portion of the lot. Major City Goals (MCG) •Housing •Multi-Modal Transportation •Climate Action •Fiscal Sustainability & Responsibility Other Important Objectives (OIO) •Downtown Vitality SLO Transit has continued to adjust services based upon input from riders and community members. SLO Transit was recognized as Outstanding Transportation Agency by the California Association of Coordinated Transit providers is. The award recognized the City’s update and modernization of its fleet. Additionally, the American Public Works Association (APWA) also recognized this project as a Project of The Year for 2017-18. Traffic safety projects continue to be implemented. The signal upgrade at Monterey/Osos is substantially complete and the sidewalk at 1005 Monterey Street has been repaired and a trip hazard eliminated. The Annual Traffic Safety Report for calendar year 2016 was presented to Council on February 6, 2018; reported injury collisions in 2016 were the second lowest in the 16 years of the program. Overall reported collisions were the lowest ever recorded in the program’s history. The Anholm Neighborhood Bike project received approval by Council on February 6, 2018 and was modified on April 10, 2018 with final direction to staff. Design of Phase 1 of the project has commenced, and construction of the project is anticipated in Winter 2018. Right of Way negotiations with the LDS Church are underway. The Caltrans Project Study Report (PSR) for the Prado Road Interchange was approved in April 2018. The next stage of Caltrans processing – environmental and final project approval- will now commence. There are a number of time sensitive grant projects that staff is working on. These include the Railroad Safety Trail – Taft to Pepper, Mid Higuera Widening, the Prado Road Bridge and Santa Fe Bridge replacement projects and the Tank Farm/Orcutt Road Roundabout. Some projects, such as minor NTM projects are being delayed in order to meet these deadlines and not endanger grant funding. Climate Action 40% Complete Implement Climate Action Plan, assess requirements to achieve a “net-zero carbon City” target, and implement cost-effective measures, including implementation of a Sustainability Coordinator and formation of a Green Team. The City hired a Sustainability Manager, effective March 8, 2018. Since being hired, the Sustainability Manager has been re-forming the Green Team and supporting the Climate Coalition Task Force as staff liaison. Staff has been working on scoping the climate action plan update, which will include a GHG emissions update and operationalization of the net zero carbon city target and is expected to be completed in in Summer 2019. Staff has worked to create sustainability incentive programs through support of the development of a green business program for local businesses, the SLO Green Challenge website for residents, and by working in collaboration with regional partners. In April 2018, staff received a biennial facility energy benchmarking report and is pursuing energy efficiency lighting audits. Staff is also pursuing the siting of solar on City facilities. In addition, Utilities received approval from the City Council in April of 2018 to complete investment grade audits for energy efficiency projects. In Spring 2018, staff began participating in two electric vehicle charging programs, which could bring over 40 electric vehicles chargers to the City for public and fleet uses. These programs would be funded through licensing fees or utility program incentives. In April of 2018, the City received confirmation from the City of Morro Bay of intent to participate in the Community Choice Energy (CCE) program. In May of 2018, City Council approved release of a request-for-proposals (RFP) for technical energy services for the purpose of developing and operating a CCE program. The selected proposer is expected to be under contract in July of 2018. Fiscal Sustainability & Responsibility 50% Complete Continue to implement the City’s Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy with a focus on economic development and responsiveness, unfunded liabilities, and infrastructure financing. A Fiscal Health Response Plan to address identified $8.9 million structural budget gap due to significant increases in pension costs to pay down unfunded liabilities has been developed and adopted by Council on April 17, 2018. The Fiscal Health Response Plan has been applied to the 2018-19 Budget resulting in operational reductions that have minimal service level impacts and are achievable in 2018-19. Staff conducted a 10-year review of the General Fund’s Capital Improvement needs. The project list identified the cost of maintaining existing infrastructure, enhancing existing infrastructure, or building new projects. It was determined through Measure G there is sufficient to maintain existing infrastructure it is not for enhancing existing infrastructure. Initial findings were presented to Council on January 16, 2018. Staff conducted additional project analysis based on Council direction. This review resulted in a Funding the Future of SLO initiative, twenty years of capital projects which fulfill the city’s vision as articulated in various planning documents. In additions, staff completed an initial public engagement process and a financial summary. Council reviewed this information on April 14, 2018. Council provided direction for additional public engagement and project review to be included in the 19-21 Financial Plan. The City continues to address closure of the Diablo Canyon and prepare for the impacts to the region due to significant loss of jobs and property tax value. California Public Utilities Commission rejected the PG&E settlement with the local governments based on an administrative judge ruling. The City is pursuing a legislative strategy to address the ruling and to advocate for legislative relief to the region. 2017-19 OTHER IMPORTANT OBJECTIVES ACTION HIGHLIGHTS 2018 Downtown Vitality 50% Complete Continue to improve safety, infrastructure investment, and maintenance in the Downtown and support Downtown Association’s proposal to consider a Downtown improvement district. Maintenance work continues in the downtown core which includes tree maintenance, sidewalk scrubbing, and street sweeping. Replacement of the Marsh Street Bridge design work continues and is scheduled to start construction in Spring of 2019. The next Downtown Renewal Project located in the 800 block of Higuera Street is delayed and anticipated to start construction in Winter 2019. Planning work for the Downtown Concept Plan and Mission Plaza Concept Plan is complete. Implementation of portions of the Mission Plaza Concept Plan will commence in the summer of 2018. The Community Action Team and Bicycle Patrols continue to maintain public safety by focusing efforts in addressing chronic offenders and evening patrols within the downtown. Continued coordination with the Downtown Association to educate the community on homelessness issues is underway. Police Department coordination with the County of San Luis Obispo to expanded mental Health Services is underway. The County has award a contract to Transitions Mental Health Association for services and a Memorandum of Understanding is currently under development between the City and Transitions Mental Health Association to help address transient mental health needs. An increased percentage of calls for service due to homelessness issues has been identified by the Police Department. In April 2018 the Police Department designated one of the sergeant positions as the Downtown sergeant and will focus on addressing the needs and crimes within the City’s downtown. NEXT REVIEW The next review of the 2017-19 Major City Goals and Other Important Objectives will occur at midway through 2018-19. Individual items requiring policy direction and/or Council approval will continue to be brought to Council for consideration and direction. TASK AND STATUS REPORTS Housing: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Facilitate increased production of all housing types designed to be economically accessible to the area workforce and low and very low-income residents, through increased density and proximity to transportation corridors in alignment with the Climate Action Plan. # Task Completion Date Revised Status 1 Update of City Zoning Regulations to comply with the Land Use Element. 6/2018 8/2018 The Zoning Regulations Update began in May 2017 and anticipated to be completed by August 2018. 2 Affordable Housing Nexus Study 12/2018 6/2019 The Affordable Housing Nexus Study was delayed in order to complete the Capital Facilities Fee Program Nexus Study, which was adopted by Council in April 2018. Staff is currently preparing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the Affordable Housing Nexus Study and anticipates that a consultant will be selected in Fall 2018, with the Affordable Nexus Study being completed in June 2019. 3 HE 2.16: Evaluate and consider including a workforce level of affordability to increase housing options for those making between 121-160% of the Area Median Income. 6/2018 6/2019 An Administrative Draft Workforce Housing Program is currently under staff review and will be available for community and stakeholder review in Summer 2018. 4 HE 4.6: Consider amending the City’s Inclusionary Housing Ordinance and Affordable Housing Incentives to require that affordable units in a development be of similar number of bedrooms, character and basic quality as the non-restricted units in locations that avoid segregation of such units. 12/2018 6/2019 An Administrative Draft Workforce Housing Program is currently under staff review, and will be available for community and stakeholder review in Summer 2018. 5 HE 6.12, 6.13 & 6.27 & LUE 4.0.28: Continue to develop incentives to encourage additional housing in the Downtown Core (C-D Zone), including alternatives to calculating residential density, to encourage the development of smaller efficiency units. 6/2019 8/2018 This will be included in the Zoning Regulations Update, but may require further amendment following the results of the Affordable Housing Nexus Study. 6 HE 6.15: Consider General Plan amendments to re- zone commercial, manufacturing or public facility zoned areas for higher density, infill or mixed-use housing where land development patterns are suitable and impact to Low-Density Residential areas is minimal. 12/2018 Ongoing A list of applicable properties is maintained and periodically updated. 7 HE 6.28: Evaluate how lot patterns (i.e. size, shape, slope) in the City’s multi-family zones affect the City’s ability to meet housing production policies. If warranted, consider setting a minimum number of dwellings on each legal lot in the R-2, R-3 and R-4 zones, regardless of lot size, when other property development standards, such as parking, height limits and setbacks can be met. 6/2019 12/2018 A list of applicable properties was identified and inventoried. They will be evaluated further following the completion of the Zoning Regulations Update and the Subdivision Regulations Update. 8 HE 6.30: Eliminate the one-acre minimum lot area for PD overlay zoning, and identify incentives to conventional subdivision design. 6/2018 8/2018 A list of applicable properties was identified and inventoried. They will be evaluated further following the completion of the Zoning Regulations Update and the Subdivision Regulations Update. 9 HE 6.31: Consider scaling development impact fees for residential development based on size, number of bedrooms, and room counts. 6/2019 4/2018 The transportation component of the Capital Facilities Fee Program and the Water and Wastewater Development Impact Fee Program include tiered impact fees based on unit size and type (e.g., single family vs. multifamily). Additional tiering may be recommended as a result of the Affordable Housing Nexus Study. 10 HE 9.12 & LUE 3.5.7.1: Consider incentivizing dwelling units to a minimum size of 150 square feet, consistent with the California Building Code, by reduced impact fees and property development standards. Ongoing Ongoing work effort with opportunities to implement additional incentives in the Zoning Regulations Update. The recently adopted Capital Facilities Fee Program and Water and Wastewater Development Impact Fee Program include tiered development impact fees to incentivize the development of smaller residential units. Additional tiering may be recommended as a result of the Affordable Housing Nexus Study. 11 Continue to prioritize streamlining and expediting projects that facilitate increased production of all housing types that are economically accessible to the area workforce, low, and very low income residents. Ongoing Ongoing work effort, and a formal streamlining process or program may be implemented through the adoption of a Workforce Housing Ordinance 12 Continue to implement Housing Element programs and housing production goals. Ongoing Ongoing work effort, which is supported by the recent adoption of the Capital Facilities Fee Program and the Water and Wastewater Development Impact Fee Program, and the Accessory Dwelling Unit Ordinance. This work effort will continue to be supported through the Zoning Regulations Update, the Subdivision Regulations Update, the Workforce Housing Ordinance, and the Affordable Housing Nexus Study. 13 Provide timely building permit review and inspections for new housing developments. Ongoing Ongoing work effort, the Community Development Department is continuously looking for ways to improve and expedite the building permit review and inspection process for new housing development. The implementation of E-Plan check should improve efficiency and reduce cost to developers. 14 Support employer/employee and employer/developer financing programs and partnerships to increase housing opportunities specifically targeted towards the local workforce. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. Staff is currently working with People’s Self Help Housing of San Luis Obispo and local employers to develop a housing project that would be targeted towards producing housing specifically for the local workforce. 15 Continue the City’s participation with the Workforce Housing Coalition, San Luis Obispo County Housing Trust Fund to identify, evaluate, and Ongoing Ongoing work effort. City Staff participate and attend the meetings of the Workforce Housing Coalition and the San Luis Obispo implement strategies to increase the production of housing. County Housing Trust Fund in an effort to identify opportunities for collaboration to achieve common goals and objectives associated with the continued development of housing in the City. 16 CAP TLU 8.1: Improve the City’s jobs-housing balance to reduce VMT from commuting. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. The City is continuously looking for opportunities to support and facilitate the production of housing, especially transit-oriented development and infill development near employment, shopping and recreation centers. 17 HE 2.17: Continue to consider increasing residential densities above state density bonus allowances for projects that provide housing for low, very low and extremely low-income households. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. Incentives that increase residential densities above state density bonuses for projects that provide targeted housing for low, very low and extremely low- income households are encouraged and are evaluated on a project by project basis. The completion of the Affordable Housing Nexus Study may provide the City with some additional tools to further support this ongoing work effort. 18 HE 3.10: Continue to encourage the creation of dwellings in the Downtown Core (CD Zone) and the Downtown Planning Area by continuing the no net loss program. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. The recently adopted Downtown Concept Plan and the Zoning Regulations Update encourage and /or provide for the continued creation of residential dwelling units in the Downtown Core and the Downtown Planning Area. 19 HE 5.5: Review new developments for compliance with City regulations and revise projects or establish conditions of approval as needed to implement housing variety and tenure policies. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. New Development projects are reviewed for compliance with all applicable City regulations and developers are encouraged to provide projects that will result in a wide variety of housing types for all income levels. 20 HE 6.14: Specific plans for any new expansion area identified shall include R-3 and R-4 zoned land to ensure sufficient land is designated at appropriate densities to accommodate the development of extremely low, very-low and low income dwellings. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. The recently approved Specific Plans for San Luis Ranch and Avila Ranch included a mix of residential zoning and land use designations, including land specifically zoned for R-3 and R-4 densities to accommodate the development of rental and for-sale residential development products for extremely low, very-low and low-income households. 21 HE 6.18: Seek opportunities with other public agencies and public utilities to identify, surplus land for housing, to convert vacant or underutilized public, utility or institutional buildings to housing. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. City staff are continuously seeking opportunities to work with our regional partners to identify opportunities for the development of housing. The City is currently working with Cal Poly to facilitate the development of their proposed workforce housing project at the corner of Grand and Slack. 22 CAP TLU 8.2: Support infill housing projects that implement General Plan policies, especially BMR housing close to job opportunities. Ongoing Ongoing work effort. City staff continues to work with developers, non-profits, and our regional partners to implement infill housing development that is consistent with General Plan policies and the Housing Major City Goal. Multimodal Transportation: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Prioritize implementation of the Bicycle Master Plan, pedestrian safety, and the Short-Range Transit Plan. 1 Task Completion Date Revised Status 1 Begin Construction of Railroad Safety Trail – Taft to Pepper. 3/2019 Right of way acquisition underway, Council Closed Session held in March; 60% plan set approved by UPRR. Completing final design for submittal to UPRR 2 Complete Railroad Safety Trail Extension – Pepper to Train Station. 3/2019 Design scheduled to begin 2018. 3 Begin Construction of Bob Jones Trail - Prefumo Creek to Oceanaire (grant funding dependent). 3/2019 Preliminary planning and design underway. Potential new routing may be identified. No funding to complete construction has been acquired and construction delay is anticipated. 4 Begin construction of 1st phase of the Broad Street Bike Blvd. 8/2018 01/2019 Council adopted plan on February 5th and again updated project on February 20th and April 10th. Phase 1 under design with construction intended for winter 2018. Negotiations with LDS for right of way underway. Construction tentatively scheduled for January 2019 due to additional time constraints of Council direction for neighborhood meetings and revisions to Phase II of project. 5 Implement Minor Bicycle Facility Improvements. Ongoing Additional green and buffered bike lane improvements are planned as a component of the neighborhood Roadway Sealing project in summer 2018. 6 Broad Street Corridor Access Improvements. 6/2019 South Broad improvements are included as a need in the Funding the Future of SLO discussion. RFP for design to be circulated in June 2018. 7 Complete Pedestrian & Bikeway Maintenance. Ongoing Meadow Park Pathway work anticipated to start construction in fall 2019. 8 Complete Sidewalk Replacements & New Installations. Ongoing Locations are currently undergoing design and coordination with Tree Committee and adjacent property owners, including 686 Higuera where Tree Committee recently approved removal of a Ficus tree for sidewalk replacement. 9 Complete New Streetlight Installations. Ongoing Scheduled 1st installation for end of 2018. 10 Construct Safe Routes to School: Foothill X-Ing Project. Ongoing Foothill/Ferrini crossing and Class I Path in design. Construction targeted Winter 2018-- pending right-of-way agreement with LDS Church which is underway. 11 Begin Bicycle Transportation Plan update to Active Transportation Plan. 1/2018 Ongoing Consultant has been selected and work will commence. 12 Develop Parklet Application Guide. 3/2018 12/2018 This will be consolidated into the Active Transportation Plan. 13 Work with Senior Councils and Commissions to include senior citizen issues in the upcoming Active Transportation. Ongoing This will be consolidated into the Active Transportation Plan. 14 Continue Deployment of Advance Pedestrian Signal Timing. Ongoing Continuing deployment. Additional locations to be identified in conjunction with most recent Vision Zero/Traffic Safety Report. 15 Implement revised routes and schedules for Short Range Transit Plan. 7/2017 Complete Staff continues to monitor and adjust routes for service delivery. 16 Upgrade and replace the SLO Transit Automatic Vehicle Locators (AVL) system. 6/2018 12/2018 Grant funds have been secured and initial research of open source options has commenced. A pilot project is currently underway. 17 Work with SLOCOG, RTA and the County of San Luis Obispo to advance the relocation of the Downtown Transit Center. Ongoing Discussions continue with SLOCOG, RTA and others to determine project scope and potential relocation issues. Site options are being reconsidered. 18 Begin construction of Higuera Street Widening – Elks to Chumash Village. 9/2018 3/2019 Construction targeted for Spring 2019. 19 Begin Construction of Prado Road Bridge Widening at SLO Creek. 4/2019 1/2020 Design and environmental review underway. Construction targeted for FY 2019-20. State funding delays. 20 Complete Caltrans’ PAED (environmental) process for the Prado Road Interchange. 6/2019 PSR approved by Caltrans in April work now able to commence. Supplemental EIR being prepared for modified project description for SLO Ranch project. 21 Continue Traffic Safety & Operations Programs. Ongoing 2016 Report approved by Council in February 2018, with future projects to be included in future Financial Plans. 2017 Report is scheduled for 4th Quarter 2018. 22 Implement 2015 Traffic Safety Report Projects. 6/2019 Signal at Monterey/Osos is complete. Long term projects such as Laurel Lane and California/Taft for 2019. 23 Construct of California & Taft Roundabout. 6/2019 Design is 65% complete. Grant funding needed for construction which may delay construction start. 24 Complete Design of Tank Farm & Orcutt Roundabout. 6/2018 10/2018 Design underway. 25 Complete Bridge Maintenance Projects. Ongoing 2/2019 Preventative bridge maintenance project work was rescoped to complete major maintenance work on El Capitan Pedestrian and Bike Bridge. This project is currently under design with an estimated start of construction in Winter 2018 pending successful appropriation of construction funds. 26 Complete Street Reconstruction & Resurfacing. Ongoing Concrete Streets and Accessibility Improvements project on Dana Street opened for bids in April and is scheduled to begin construction in June. The neighborhood Roadway Sealing and Laurel Lane Complete Streets project is anticipated to start construction in summer 2018. 27 Continue to support multimodal infrastructure installation and upgrade thru new development. Ongoing Every new development project reviewed by Transportation staff includes reference to the current Bicycle Transportation Plan projects and city multimodal objectives. Significant work being done on Avila Ranch, SLO Ranch and OASP developments for infrastructure installation. 28 Continue implementation of the City’s Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program at reduced level from prior years. Ongoing The NTM program has been impacted due to addition of Farmer’s Market Safety project and processing of the Anholm Neighborhood Bikeway project. Minor NTM will continue to move forward but major projects will be delayed. 29 Continue Traffic Signs and Striping maintenance. Ongoing Late winter 2018. Climate Action: 2017-19 Action Objective: Implement Climate Action Plan, assess requirements to achieve a “net-zero carbon City” target, and implement cost-effective measures, including implementation of a Sustainability Coordinator and formation of a Green Team. # Task Completion Date Revised Status 1 Identify Resources. a. Introduce Sustainability Coordinator to the City. b. Creation of a City “Green Team” and establishment of roles and responsibilities. c. Support for the establishment of a “Community Climate Action Coalition”. 11/2017 Complete The position of Sustainability Manager was filled in March 2018. Work has restarted on creating a green team and supporting a Community Climate Action Coalition. 2 Net Zero Carbon City a. Assessment of the requirements to achieve a “net-zero carbon city” target. b. Identify opportunity sites to create “net zero carbon district(s)” c. c. Feasibility analysis and implementation of a Community Choice Energy Program 6/2018 6/2019 Climate Action Plan Update will address and is to be completed in June 2019. Council provided direction to staff to pursue a Community Choice Energy (CCE) Program in December of 2017. RFP for technical and energy services to start the CCE program and has coordinated with the City of Morro Bay to create a joint power authority (JPA) to operate the program. 3 Updating the Climate Action Plan. 12/2018 6/2019 In May 2018, CDD and Administration completed a scope and schedule for the Climate Action Plan, to be completed by June 2019. 4 Re-evaluation of the feasibility or relevance of some of the identified GHG emissions reduction implementation measures that are identified in the CAP, and identification of potential implementation funding sources. 3/2018 7/2018 As part of the Climate Action Plan update, staff will re-evaluate the GHG emissions reductions measures identified in the existing planning document. For municipal energy efficiency measures, the Sustainability Manager is coordinating with Public Works to evaluate feasibility of on-bill financing of design build concept for energy projects 5 Updating the City’s GHG emissions inventory. 6/2018 8/2018 A community and municipal operations GHG inventory is expected to be completed in August 2018. 6 Biennial reporting on the effectiveness of individual climate action adaptation and GHG emission reduction strategies. 5/2019 6/2019 The biennial report will be developed as part of the Climate Action Plan update. 7 Ongoing accountability and monitoring of the effectiveness and progress for all CAP implementation strategies and measures. 6/2019 The Climate Action Plan update will be developed to integrate accountability and monitoring processes into measure implementation. 8 Development of enhanced incentive programs. 6/2019 Staff has supported creation of regional incentive support programs, including: SLO Green Business Program (lead by Cuesta College), slogreenchallenge.org, an online platform to support access and participation in existing residential incentive programs. In April 2018 the California Public Utilities Commission approved creation of a Regional Energy Network for Santa Barbara, Ventura, and San Luis Obispo Counties to provide enhanced residential energy efficiency incentives. 9 Performance of energy assessments/audits on all City-owned facilities. 3/2018 7/2019 Performance assessments complete. Comprehensive audits are pending a defined funding source. 10 Implementation of energy and cost saving measures and projects that were identified in the energy assessments/audits on all City-owned facilities. 7/2018 Lighting retrofits are potential projects pending a defined funding source. Additional efforts to site solar renewable energy systems on City facilities to lower energy costs are also underway. City Hall HVAC scheduled for replacement with a more energy efficient unit. 11 Monitoring and measuring of City-owned facility and infrastructure performance. 8/2018 7/2019 Comprehensive audit of minor, or secondary infrastructure pending input from stakeholders. 12 Preparation of an Energy Baseline Report and Rate Analysis for City-owned facilities and infrastructure. 3/2019 Ongoing Comprehensive audit of minor, or secondary infrastructure pending input from stakeholders. Fiscal Sustainability and Responsibility: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to implement the City’s Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy with a focus on economic development and responsiveness, structurally balanced fiscal outlook, unfunded liabilities, and infrastructure financing. # Task Completion Date Revised Status 1 Update the Economic Development Strategic Plan (EDSP) that considers and leverages regional strategies to address the planned closure of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. Summer 2018 Fall 2018 The City is working to fill the Economic Development Manager position who will lead the effort to update Economic Development Strategic Plan. 2 Develop the relevant policies and action plans to allocate the $1.82 million in funding restricted for Economic Development anticipated with the Diablo Canyon Power Plant closure settlement agreement, if approved. Spring 2019 The Diablo Canyon Power Plant settlement agreement was rejected by California Public Utilities Commission following administrative judge proposed ruling to reject. The City continues to advocate for and actively participate in the process to approve SB 1090. 3 Complete an update of the City’s Development Impact Fee Program (AB 1600). Winter 2018 Complete Adopted March 2018. 4 Increase revenues from property, sales, and Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) by implementing strategies in the EDSP. Ongoing 5 Continue partnership with Hothouse to create and expand economic activities. Ongoing 6 Continue to implement Fiscal Health Contingency Plan measures that address short and long-term financial challenges. Ongoing All hiring and travel expenditures require case by case approval to maximize expenditure savings. 7 Engage employees in Fiscal Health Contingency measures such as categorizing programs and services, promoting cost savings through suggestion programs, and identifying budget balancing ideas. Engage the community in the City’s Fiscal Health through Speakers Bureaus, online resources, and holding community workshops and meetings with Council. Summer 2017 Complete A statistically valid survey was completed in March 2018. Internal and external communications and presentations were provided leading up to the April 2018 adoption of the Fiscal Health Response Plan. Staff will continue to engage and educate the community through Fall 2018 leading to the General Election regarding information on any revenue measures. 8 Develop a budget balancing plan for City Council actions consistent with the Fiscal Health Contingency Plan based on community input that identifies actions and operational changes needed to achieve fiscal responsibility. Spring 2018 Complete April 17, 2018 Council adopted the Fiscal Health Response Plan on April 17, 2018. This plan presents a framework to address the budget imbalance arising from unfunded liabilities associated with CalPERS the City’s retirement investment system. It does so with a balanced approach over a three-year period 13 Implement Plastic Straw Regulations. 10/2017 Complete Implementation is ongoing. 14 Implement Plastic Bottle Regulations. 4/2018 Complete Implementation is ongoing. Fiscal Sustainability and Responsibility: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to implement the City’s Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy with a focus on economic development and responsiveness, structurally balanced fiscal outlook, unfunded liabilities, and infrastructure financing. # Task Completion Date Revised Status and includes revenue options, operating expenditure reductions and new ways of doing business and, as well as shared employee responsibility for concessions. Upon the adoption of the Plan, Council provided strategic budget direction to inform the 2018-19 Supplemental Budget and the Plan will guide the 2019-21 Financial Plan. 9 Return with Strategic Budget Direction for 2018- 2019. Spring 2018 Complete Council provided direction on April 17, 2018 with adoption of the Fiscal Health Response Plan. 10 Implement Fee Study changes and maintain fees consistent with Council policies on cost recovery. Ongoing Fees are updated for CPI on annual basis. Per City policy a formal Service charges fee study will be conducted every five years. 11 Continue to align Local Revenue Measures with voter priorities as determined by the Revenue Enhancement Oversight Committee. Ongoing Staff holds public meetings with Revenue Enhancement Oversight Committee (REOC) as required by the ballot measure and ensures review of the revenues and expenditures by REOC for compliance with the ballot measure intent. 12 Conduct a long-term fiscal study that incorporates the anticipated financial impacts related to the planned closure of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. Spring 2018 December 2018 Staff continues to advocate for and actively participate in the process to approve SB 1090. The bill is currently in committees. Staff is also working on options with the Coalition of Cities and other partners to fund the study. 13 Conduct a comprehensive review of fiscal policies and fund balance requirements. Winter 2017 Fall 2018 Staff is continuing to review the fiscal policies and fund balance requirements as part of the Fiscal Health Response Plan and will continue to make recommendations aligned with Council policy direction. 14 Provide a recommendation for strategic budget direction prior to submitting a 2018-19 Supplemental Budget that achieves long-term structurally balanced fiscal outlook. Spring 2018 Complete Staff presented recommendations on April 17, 2018 with Fiscal Health Response Plan adoption. 15 Implement operating cost reductions consistent with adopted 2018-19 budget. Through Summer 2019 Ongoing The proposed 2018-19 Supplemental Budget contains operating reductions, new ways of doing business and new revenues. 16 Continue to implement and track operational efficiencies including alternative service delivery, best management practices, and cost containment measures that preserve the effectiveness of City services and operations. Ongoing The adopted Fiscal Health Response Plan focuses on alternative ways of doing business to reduce cost while minimizing service level impacts. Savings will be achieved through refinancing of debt and early pay-down of unfunded liabilities. New ways of doing business focused on using Fiscal Sustainability and Responsibility: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to implement the City’s Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy with a focus on economic development and responsiveness, structurally balanced fiscal outlook, unfunded liabilities, and infrastructure financing. # Task Completion Date Revised Status less consumable goods and increasing sustainability are included in the Budget Supplement as are thoughtful Departmental Reorganizations which have minimal service level impacts. The Motion project is currently in the implementation phase. Functionality will be implemented in three rollouts. Finance and Purchasing functions are planned to be rolled out in October 2018, HR and Payroll in April 2019 and Budgeting & Planning in October 2019. 17 Monitor and report performance measures at Budget Supplement and Financial Plan adoption. Ongoing Performance measures were incorporated into the 2017-19 Financial Plan and will be presented to Council with 2018-19 Supplemental Budget. 18 Work with the City Council to review Labor Relations Objectives and define negotiating parameters consistent with the Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy and the Compensation Philosophy. Summer 2017 Complete Council reviewed and approved in open session the Labor Relations Objectives (LRO) on March 20, 2018. The LRO will guide labor negotiations with employee groups. 19 Monitor liability self-insured/excess insurance program and explore options with CJPIA to control workers’ compensation costs. Ongoing The liability self-insured/excess-insurance program continues to project savings of approximately $500,000 over the primary insurance pool. However, an analysis of workers’ compensation claims indicates moving to the excess insurance program would likely cost the City more than the primary insurance pool. Both liability and workers compensation claims are closely monitored, and short and long-term cost containment strategies are being implemented. 20 Develop a policy to address the funding status of volatile insurance programs (liability, workers’ compensation). Evaluate the purpose and use of the Insurance Benefit Fund to lessen the financial impacts of the fluctuations in insurance costs. Spring 2018 Complete As part of 2017-19 Financial Plan development, the Council adopted fiscal policy for the Insurance Benefit Fund and Self-Insured Liability Program. 2017-18 is the first fiscal year managing the fund under this policy direction and no changes are being recommended. Staff will continue to monitor trend and will make recommendations as needed. 21 Implement actions aimed at reducing workers’ compensation and liability claims by 30% in 3 years (by June 30, 2019). Ongoing The liability program is on track to reduce liability claims by 10% in the first year (FY 2016-17), but it is too early to estimate whether a 20% reduction will be achieved in the current claim year (FY 2017-18), due to the time it takes for claims to mature. Based on the number and severity of workers Fiscal Sustainability and Responsibility: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to implement the City’s Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy with a focus on economic development and responsiveness, structurally balanced fiscal outlook, unfunded liabilities, and infrastructure financing. # Task Completion Date Revised Status compensation claims, it appears the first year (FY 2016-17) claim costs will not achieve the 10% reduction goal. Year two (FY 2017-18) claim year will not close until June, so it is premature to estimate whether the 20% reduction will be achieved. 22 Continue to monitor legislation that could impact City revenues and expenditures. Ongoing Staff is monitoring legislative changes that can impact revenues and expenditures and engages in advocacy through the City’s legislative platform. 23 Analyze fleet replacement policies with the goal of minimizing replacement costs and maximizing fleet utilization. Spring 2018 June 2018 Integrated the new asset management system with the City’s fueling system to improve tracking of fuel costs, use and needs of each department. Investments in hybrid technology on specific vehicles to gain fuel economy, reduce carbon footprint/GHG emissions and meet City sustainability goals. Outfitting high usage vehicles such as Police Patrol vehicles with anti-idling systems and specifying work trucks with engine idle shutdown features when possible to reduce fuel costs, emissions output, and engine wear and tear. Transit is reviewing recent State Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) mandates and will be developing an Electrification/ZEV implementation Plan for systemwide vehicle conversion. Update to the replacement policies anticipated for June 2018 to allow 4-6 months use of new asset management system. 24 Develop a contingency plan to address potential additional changes to long-term unfunded CalPERS and OPEB liabilities. Spring 2018 June 2018 Plans for addressing long-term unfunded liabilities will be presented to Council in Spring/Summer 2018. 25 Make recommendation for allocation of one-time funds. Ongoing Mid-Year 2017-18 allocations were made. 26 Develop a creative financing plan to construct the replacement and development of critical public safety facilities (i.e. Police Station and Fire Stations). Summer 2018 Complete Staff has developed 10-Year CIP addressing these funding needs and presented to Council in January 2018. The 10 Year list also included ‘Partnership Projects’ identified in the AB 1600 work described above. The project review resulted in the Funding the Future of SLO initiative. In April Council directed staff to include public engagement and additional project analysis in the 19-21 Financial Plan. Fiscal Sustainability and Responsibility: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to implement the City’s Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy with a focus on economic development and responsiveness, structurally balanced fiscal outlook, unfunded liabilities, and infrastructure financing. # Task Completion Date Revised Status 27 Develop creative infrastructure financing options (grants, land-based funding, local revenues) for Council consideration and implement as directed. Spring 2018 Complete Staff is in process of establishing CFDs for San Luis Ranch and Avila Ranch development projects. AB 1600 fee study updated and adopted by Council. In April 2018 Council reviewed long-term Capital Improvement Program funding needs. 28 Explore expanding utility fees to include storm water activities. Spring 2019 Staff is analyzing the Stormwater program and recommendations for revenue generating options to recoup the costs associated with this unfunded mandate. 29 Downtown Vitality: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to improve safety, infrastructure investment, and maintenance in the Downtown and support the Downtown Association’s proposal to consider a Downtown Improvement District. # Task Completio n Date Revised Status 1 Complete Design and begin Construction of the Palm/Nipomo Parking Structure. Summer 2019 Fall 2019 Environmental Impact Report (EIR) will be presented to Council in summer 2018 for review and approval. Design work is planned to commence thereafter. 2 Construct next phase of Downtown Renewal capital improvement project focused on the 800 block of Higuera Street. Spring 2018 Winter 2019 Project is planned to start construction in January 2019 pending coordination with Downtown Association and adjacent properties. 3 Actively work with San Luis Obispo Council of Local Governments(SLOCOG) and Regional Transit Association (RTA) to relocate the current Downtown Transportation Center to a new location east of Santa Rosa Street. Ongoing Progress is pending additional funding and coordination with development activity north of the existing downtown core. 4 Design of the Mission Plaza Concept Plan - Mission Plaza Restroom Replacement. Spring 2019 Summer 2019 Project scoping work to commence in the summer of 2018 to include the Mission Plaza restroom, café, storage area as well as concepts of what the design may look like if the Murray Adobe is incorporated into the plan. 5 Continued downtown tree maintenance, sidewalk scrubbing, and street Sweeping. Ongoing Maintenance of downtown trees, sidewalk scrubbing, and street sweeping is ongoing. 6 Begin construction of Marsh Street Bridge replacement at the southern gateway to Downtown. Spring 2019 Pending completion of right-of-way phase, authorization to advertise for construction bids will be requested of Caltrans with an Downtown Vitality: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to improve safety, infrastructure investment, and maintenance in the Downtown and support the Downtown Association’s proposal to consider a Downtown Improvement District. # Task Completio n Date Revised Status anticipated start of construction in Spring 2019. 7 Assist noncompliant properties to achieve compliance with the Downtown Fire Sprinkler Ordinance. Winter 2018 The fire department continues to assist noncompliant properties to achieve compliance with the Downtown Fire Sprinkler Ordinance. 8 Continued operation of the Community Action Team (CAT) in Downtown. Ongoing The Community Action Team continues to focus on addressing chronic offenders within the downtown. Additionally, they continue to work with City Rangers on open space violations and postings. Hiring for the Mental Health position with CAT and Transitions Mental Health Association (TMHA) is just complete. 9 Continued Downtown Bicycle Patrol. Ongoing The police department continues to deploy two bicycle officers during the day evenings. Transient related issues continue to be a priority for the bike officers. An increase in the number of calls involving the homeless population, related to the total number of calls for service has occurred. 10 Coordination between the Police Department and County of San Luis Obispo to achieve expanded mental Health Services focused on Downtown. Ongoing The County awarded the contract to TMHA and it is hiring the selected candidate. The City Attorney is working with the Police Department to complete an MOU between the City and TMHA related to this position. 11 Identification and implementation by Police Department of best practice tools designed to decrease nuisance calls in the Downtown. Ongoing The police department worked with downtown business owners to maintain trespassing letters on file for local business. In April the Police Department designated one of the sergeant positions as the Downtown sergeant. This position will be a 2-year position that will focus on addressing the needs and crimes within the City’s downtown. 12 Council and community review and consideration of Downtown Concept Plan. Summer 2017 Complete 13 Council and community review and consideration of Mission Plaza Master Plan. Fall 2017 Complete 14 Following adoption, oversee the implementation of the Downtown Concept Plan. Ongoing 15 Following adoption, develop a phasing and resources needs plan for the implementation of the Mission Plaza Concept Plan. Summer 2018 Summer 2019 A budget request to implement the first phase of work, will follow the design. Downtown Vitality: 2017-19 Action Plan Objective: Continue to improve safety, infrastructure investment, and maintenance in the Downtown and support the Downtown Association’s proposal to consider a Downtown Improvement District. # Task Completio n Date Revised Status 16 Complete the City’s Zoning Regulations Update. Summer 2018 8/2018 A Council Study Session was held April 10, 2018, a Public Workshop in May, and Planning Commission hearings in June, and Council hearing will occur in August 2018. 17 Complete a Feasibility Study for the Upper Monterey Area Plan Parking District. Summer 2019 On April 10, 2018, Council authorized an interim part of this study (Upper Monterey to the RR) as part of the Zoning Regulations Update to allow downtown development standards in this area with Planning Commission approval. This interim step will be completed in August 2018. 18 Complete a Feasibility Study of Downtown Maintenance District. Summer 2019 The Downtown Association elected to take a pause in the process to form a Property Based Improvement District pending more outreach with Downtown Property Owners. 19 Coordinate, in partnership with the Downtown Association, exploration of opportunities to provide enhanced maintenance or other services to maintain Downtown vitality. Ongoing A consultant was hired to analyze and present recommendations for a property-based business improvement district. Initial recommendations were presented to Downtown and SLO and key stakeholders in March 2018. It was determined that the continued refinement and outreach should take place over the next year before moving forward. 20 Design Farmer’s Market Safety Project and circulate for bids 11/2018 Project approved by Council as part of Mid-Year budget. Bid package under design for circulation in winter 2018. PERFORMANCE MEASURES DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: City Administration SUMMARY The City Administration Department performance and workload measures selected are illustrative of the work the department does to ensure connectivity in the organization and community as well as meeting our stated goals. They include specific targets for network connectivity, community satisfaction with public engagement and the effectiveness of our economic development efforts. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Maintain City Network Reliability Uptime Status 99.9% 99.995% 99.9% The Information Technology Division strives to provide a reliable and highly available data network to connect city staff to information and technology solutions. The indicator is expressed as the percent of uptime each year that the City's core network is online and available 99.999% of the time (no more than 8 hours per year of unscheduled and uncontrollable downtime). Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Open City Hall Participant Satisfaction Rating 90% 92% 90% Open City Hall is the City's main online platform for civic engagement. A variety of topics are regularly posted, and each member of the public is asked to complete a brief satisfaction survey regarding their experience using the tool. Regular use of Open City Hall by both the staff and public is a cost-effective way to increase engagement. The current satisfaction rating is 92% and the City aims to maintain at least a 90% rating for 2017-18 and 2018-19. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Amount of Sales and Transient Occupancy Tax $32,272,000 $31,686,000 $33,056,000 Increase the amount of sales and transient occupancy tax received by the City from $31,589,000 in 2015-16 to $33,056,000 by 2018-19, reflecting a 4.6% total increase and a 2.2% and 2.5% increase per year respectively through various economic development efforts. These figures are aligned with the City's five-year forecast and will change accordingly. * This amount is based upon 2017-18 projections. Actuals for 2017-18 will be presented to the City Council as part of the 2018-19 Mid-Year Budget. ADMINISTRATION WORKLOAD MEASURES Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 City facilities receiving IT support 30 31 31 31 Data backed-up in Gigabytes 17,455 34,910 78,200 78,200 Number of Geographic Information System layers maintained 850 860 905 905 Contacts with businesses regarding starting, expanding and staying in the City X X 25 25 Open space acquisitions / dedications and conservation plans 3 2 2 2 Promotional contracts administered 20 20 40 40 Regular and special Council Meetings held 36 36 36 36 City Manager Reports reviewed 192 220 230 240 Council agenda reports processed 252 300 300 300 Community partnership contracts administered 12 12 13 13 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: City Attorney SUMMARY The City Attorney's Office addresses a high volume of legal service needs, varying from responding to questions and information requests from the community; conducting complex legal research and providing legal advice to City Council, Commissions and City Staff; reviewing City Manager and Council Agenda Reports, contracts and development agreements; managing claims, appeals, and litigation; and attending meetings to give guidance to the Council and staff on legal issues, across multiple practice areas. Service requests and demands are unique, rather than uniform and recurring, in nature, which makes quantifying the office's efficiency and productivity within a metric framework difficult. Below are a few of the measures that reflect how staff time is spent in service to the organization and the community. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Documents Turned-around Within 4 Days 65% 72% 70% Documents routed through the City Attorney's Office for review and signature are many and varied; by the time a paper copy reaches the desk of one of our attorneys they have usually participated in its negotiation and/or drafting and, therefore, are ensuring the final version reflects the intent of the City Council, City Manager, or staff and that the form of agreements protect the City's interests. Allowing for occasional delays outside our control, a document delivered to our office should leave in route for final signature within four days. In past fiscal years, approximately 60% of documents have met this four-day goal. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Administrative Citation Appeal Process Completed Within 70 Days 80% 63% 85% Administrative Citations written for violations of the City's Municipal Code will occasionally result in an appeal being filed. The process is coordinated by City staff but relies entirely on volunteer hearing officers to review the appeals and issue decisions. It is the goal of this office to make the appeals process as efficient as possible for all those involved and measure that efficiency by the time between when a request for appeal is received and when a decision on that appeal is mailed. The process should take 70 days or less. Currently about 80% of appeals meet this goal. Appeals that were rejected or otherwise resolved outside the appeal process are not included in this measure. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Claims Against the City Resulting in Litigation 5% 7% 5% Through active management of liability claims filed against the City, it is the objective of the City Attorney's Office and Human Resources Risk Management that very few will result in litigation or judgments against the City. It is therefore the goal each year to maintain a level of less than 5% of all claims received by the City being litigated. Historically, this rate has been less than 1%. ATTORNEY WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18* 2018-19 Civil Litigation Cases Pending 9 8 6* 7 Multi-count Municipal Code Violation Complaints Filed 16 33 40* 30 Liability Claims Against the City Reviewed 83 99 54* 90 Resolutions/Ordinances Reviewed 99 90 76* 100 Public Records Requests Received by the City 141 279 267* 275 Administrative Citation Appeals Received by the City X 216 137* 175 *Count through April 2018 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Community Development SUMMARY Our mission is to serve all persons in a positive and courteous manner and help ensure that San Luis Obispo continues to be a healthy, safe, attractive, and enjoyable place to live, work, or visit. The performance measures listed below relate to some of our most important activities, including development review, affordable housing, and neighborhood wellness. During the 2017-19 Financial Plan period, the Community Development Department will be focusing on process improvements so that it can continue to meet or exceed the community's service level expectations in a constrained fiscal environment. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Percent of Development Review activities completed within established cycle times. 75% 71% 70% Meeting established cycle times for development projects is a crucial part of the development review process. Applications, plans and inspections are reviewed or conducted by multiple divisions of the City. Processing delays have negative effects on the applicant's budgets, project management and customer experience. Data gathered by this measure helps determine if additional resources are needed to meet cycle times or to assess established cycle time's viability. The target goal of meeting cycle times on 75% (Yr. 1) to 70% (Yr. 2) of all development review activities is based on assumptions that some projects will be more complex, development review activities will be extremely high, and resources will be limited. In an effort to maintain fiscal sustainability, the Community Development Department has programed an 11% reduction in operating cost in FY 2017-18 and an additional 8% reduction in FY 2018-19. It will be imperative to prioritize process improvement identification and implementation in the first year of the financial plan to obtain the targets set within this measure. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Affordable Housing Units Constructed 24 Units Added 38 Units Added 56 Units Added Community Development leads the Housing Major City Goal that focuses on the increased production of housing affordable to a range of income levels including the creation of a "workforce" affordability level, while ensuring conformance with the City's Climate Action Plan objectives to promote sustainable growth. According to the City's Regional Housing Needs Allocation, the City is to provide 464 Extremely Low, Very Low, and Low Income Affordable Housing units by June 30, 2019. Currently, the City has produced 90 units in these categories during the current RHNA period that began in June 2014, or approximately 4 per month. Based on current entitlements and applications in progress, it appears that the City will be able to support the addition of 80 additional affordable homes for these income types during the 17/19 Financial Plan period. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Code Enforcement Response Within Established Timelines 80% 82% 80% Code enforcement response times include three tiers based on the level of potential impact to life/health safety that the violation presents. Health and safety violations are given the highest priority while violations of 'general welfare' rules, such as zoning, are second tier. Property maintenance violations (Neighborhood Enhancement Ordinance) are considered third tier from a life/safety perspective. Neighborhood Wellness is unique in that it also involves proactive patrols to implement City objectives. This performance measure assesses the performance of the Code Enforcement Division with respect to response time to complaints received. The standards are: FIRST TIER - 24 Hours: SECOND TIER - 2 Days: Third Tier - 3-5 Days COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015- 16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Number of Development Review Applications Processed/Within cycle time N/A 967/831 800/600 750/525 Engineering Development Review Apps Processed/Within Cycle Times N/A 27/15 40/30 40/28 Building Permit Apps Processed/Within Cycle Times N/A 734/339 750/563 800/560 Inspections Conducted/Conducted next day N/A 4525/4029 4600/4000 4600/4000 Enforcement Cases Reported/ Responded Within Cycle Times N/A 587/456 600/480 600/510 1Affordable Housing Units Constructed (Cumulative) 88 90 114 170 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Finance SUMMARY The Finance department is responsible for safeguarding the City's resources and fiscal health. Finance department implements financial policies, plans and reporting systems to serve the citizens and enable operating departments achieve their objectives. The measures below were created to align with the Finance Department's mission by measuring the quality of financial reporting, implementation of fiscal policies, and the Department's ability to serve citizens and enable operating departments achieve their objectives. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018- 19 Receive the Government Finance Officers Association Distinguished Budget and CAFR Award Yes No Yes The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) issues the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting (CAFR) and the Distinguished Budget Preparation Award to recognize local governments that go beyond the minimum requirements of generally accepted accounting principles when preparing comprehensive annual financial reports, that provide full disclosure of financial status to the public, and that prepare budget documents of the very highest quality that reflect both the guidelines established by the National Advisory Council on State and Local Budgeting and the GFOA’s best practices on budgeting. The last time the City applied for this award was for fiscal year 2015. The City will apply for this award going forward. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018- 19 Meet Budget and Fiscal Policy Fund Balance Requirements 100% 100% 100% Through semi-annual reporting to the City Council, ensure that the City is meeting all budget and fiscal policy adopted fund balance requirements. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018- 19 Meet all Federal, State, and City Charter Reporting Requirements 100% 100% 100% Provide accurate and timely financial reporting data as required to Federal and State entities as well as to the City Council as required by the City Charter. FINANCE WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Business Tax Certificates Issued 8,127 8,176 8,180 8,180 Payroll Checks and Direct Deposits 14,500 14,824 15,000 15,000 Vendor Invoices Processed 25,500 27,200 27,500 27,500 Accounts Payable Checks 8,264 8,774 8,774 8,774 W-2's Issued 766 807 807 807 1099's Issued 117 127 137 137 Journal Entries Processed 1,611 1,575 1,550 1,550 Budget Amendment Requests Processed 280 274 277 277 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Fire SUMMARY The Fire Department is responsible for protecting life and property by responding to medical emergencies, fires, hazardous materials incidents and other emergencies as well as for promoting public safety through fire prevention programs including commercial property inspections, plan review and fire sprinkler and fire alarm systems. Performance Measure Targets and workload measures were determined by current funding and staffing levels. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017- 18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Meet the Total Response Time (TRT) goal as defined by General Plan Safety Element of 7 minutes or less to 90% of all lights-and-siren emergencies in the City. 90% 83.5% 90% Total Response Time is calculated from the time of 911 pick-up in the City's Emergency Communication Center until arrival of the first Fire Department personnel at the scene. For serious medical emergencies and fires of all types, rapid arrival at the scene impacts outcomes. The time standard established in the General Plan Safety Element are reflective of the guidance standards of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Circumstances impacting this aspirational measure include: City growth, increased 911 calls for service, traffic, and non-emergency crew duties (such as training, fire prevention activities, and public educations events). Measure/Explanation Target 2017- 18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Maximize property saved from fire damage 85% 65.9% 85% The Fire Department's ability to extinguish fires to prevent further property damage is one of its primary goals. The ability to accomplish this goal is influenced by many factors. Elements of minimizing property loss by fires include public education, fire prevention inspections, code enforcement, development plan review, reduction of fire hazards and fire department response times. The target goal of 85% will be measure by overall property value saved versus property value loss. In 2015- 16 the amount saved was 85.5% and 2016-17 was 82.5%. The 2017-18 property saved dropped to 66% due to the complete loss of a large commercial structure. Measure/Explanation Target 2017- 18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Percentage of Fire Department Development Review activities completed within published cycle times 80% 65.3% 50% Customer service is an essential component of public service. Meeting published cycle times for Development projects is a crucial part of the development review process. Applications, plans and inspections are reviewed or conducted by multiple divisions of the City. Processing delays have negative effects on the applicant's budgets, project management and customer experience. Data gathered by this measure helps determine if additional resources are needed to meet cycle times or to assess published cycle times viability. The target goal of meeting cycle times on 80% of all development review activities is based on assumptions that some projects will be more complex, development review activities will be extremely high, and resources will be limited. In 2018-19, as a result of decreased funding for contract plan review services the target is reduced to 50%. The 2017-18 percentage fell below target due to increased demand and an unplanned fire prevention staff vacancy for 6 months. FIRE WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Fire Incidents (National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) 100 series) * 167 162 167 172 Rescue and Medical Services (NFIRS 300 series) * 3769 3635 3744 3856 Total Fire Responses* 5877 5920 6097 6280 Fire and Safety Inspections 1260 1267 1275 1287 Building Plan and Development Plan Reviews 773 802 800 820 Emergency Response Personnel Average Training Hours* 189 150 160 170 Disaster Preparedness Programs Provided - - 30 35 Out of County Mutual Aid billing 40 41 32 32 *Calendar year: 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Human Resources SUMMARY The mission of the Human Resources Department is helping employees realize their full potential, so they can effectively serve our community. The Human Resources performance measures include objectives such as on-time employee performance evaluations, internal employee promotions and reducing liability and workers compensation claims. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017- 18 Target 2018- 19 Percentage of On-time Employee Performance Evaluations 90% 86% 95% The Human Resources Department will work with other departments to increase the percentage of on-time performance evaluations delivered to employees. Currently the City has 84% of performance evaluations completed on-time. Performance evaluations increase communication between a supervisor and employee, reiterate all the hard work and performance feedback provided during the evaluation period, and can be a motivational tool to the employee. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017- 18 Target 2018- 19 Percentage of Internal Promotions 38% 55% 38% The Employment Opportunity Program (EOP) is designed to give current employees a window of opportunity to apply for and possibly transfer or promote into another classification when there is a vacancy prior to the start of an outside recruitment. This program supports succession planning opportunities for all employees, including regular (non- probationary), contract and supplemental employees. Hiring internally has many benefits, some of which are: It promotes a Healthy and Smart Organization, it saves money in recruitment costs, retains high quality trained employees dedicated to serving the community, proven loyalty to the organization and community, seamless transition to new duties, and it is a synergistic fit for team culture. Currently internal promotions at the City have averaged 38% over the past five years with a goal of continuing at that same rate going forward. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017- 18 Target 2018- 19 Reduction in Liability and Workers Compensation Claims -10% -31% -20% The Human Resources Department will work with other departments to reduce losses associated with the City’s worker’s compensation and liability programs. This program will facilitate the implementation of several loss control strategies to reach the end goal of a 30% reduction of losses in these two programs over the span of three years. Improvements on employee safety and decreasing liability claims will lead to reduced costs. Reducing employee work-related injuries and illnesses also reduces the stress, strain, lost time, and discomfort of employees, thus positively impacting productivity and morale. This performance measure will use the current five-year averages to set benchmarks in reducing claim numbers and claim costs by 30% in 3 years. For workers' compensation the goal is to reduce the claim count from 56 (a 5-year average) to 43 claims severity from an annual total of $1. 3M to $1M and total annual loss days from 697 to 536. For liability, the goal is reduced the claim count from 41 (a 5-year average) to 32 and claims severity from an annual total of $465,000 to $360,000. *This performance measure will only take into account liability claims that incurred monetary losses 1 The Liability program should achieve the 10% reduction and a weighted average reflects a 3% reduction to the budget for both programs. HUMAN RESOURCES WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure/Explanation 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Recruitments - Regular and Supplemental 80 80 70 70 Labor relations activity 39 45 40 40 Applications screened 3650 2600 3000 3000 Training sessions coordinated 32 31 31 31 Classification, compensation and benefit analysis 149 48 45 45 Liability Claims Filed 92 79 72 65 Workers Compensation Claims Filed 58 52 47 43 Fitness Assessment Participants 23 20 22 22 Employee Assistance Program Participants 100 100 110 110 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Parks and Recreation SUMMARY The Parks and Recreation Department's mission is: Inspiring happiness by creating community through people, parks, programs, and open space. The measures below align with the Department's mission, measuring both number of people served through programs, events, facilities, and trails maintained; as well as the number of volunteers who help make this programming successful. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Maintain and Enhance Parks and Recreation Participation 337,315 337,923 337,900 The Parks and Recreation Department offers a wide variety of diverse programs that appeal to the community. The target goal will be to maintain the number of participants, currently 337,315, and enhance their experience in Parks and Recreation programs, events and facility visits. Programming is currently at capacity throughout the majority of the divisions in Parks and Recreation. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Increase Number of Volunteers in Parks and Recreation Number Pending 12- month use of services 970 3% The Parks and Recreation Department strives to maximize the use of volunteers Department-wide, with each Division identifying its own needs. The City's new volunteer software program, CERVIS Technologies, will provide streamlined access for Parks and Recreation Staff and Volunteers. In year one, Parks and Recreation will establish the number of volunteers, and increase by 3% in year two. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Miles of Trails Maintained in the City Open Space 53 Miles 55 miles 55 Miles The City has 53 miles of trails that Ranger Service staff and volunteers, maintain, manage, and patrol in addition to its creek corridors. Over the two-year budget cycle, the Ranger staff will build out and increase trails from 53 to 55 miles. They protect the City's natural resources by completing maintenance, rehabilitation and patrol of the open space. Daily the Rangers visit 25 trailheads, inspect 7-8 miles of creek corridor and maintain the 4,000 acres of open space. PARKS AND RECREATION WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Youth Service Participants 795 795 1,250 1,200 Adult/Youth Sports Participants 1,695 1,695 * Not incl Adult Softball Teams 4,069 4,000 Triathlon Participants 1,000 975 1,000 1,000 Golf Rounds Played 30,508 28,800 25,383 28,000 Contract Class Participants 994 1,050 865 1100 Pool Users 68,400 86,000 92,159 93,000 Facilities Attendance 218,000 218,000 218,000 218,000 Special Events Permitted 85 93 87 90 Seniors Programming 260 300 300 300 Jack House & PRC Meetings 24 24 22 22 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Police SUMMARY The mission of the Police Department is to maintain a safe city by working in partnership with the community to protect life and property, prevent and reduce crime, and improve the quality of life in our neighborhoods. The Police Department's performance measures include objectives such as crime reduction, community outreach, and fiscal sustainability. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Crime Reduction -5% -13% -14% The Police Department will work to reduce Part 1 Crime (defined as crimes against persons) by 5% as compared to FY 2016-17. Methods for reaching this goal include; utilizing a crime analyst position, rapid deployment of resources, increased social media, lowest level problem solving tactics and accountability, and utilizing intelligence led policing. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Increased Community Outreach Programs 5 6 7 The Police Department has created several new outreach opportunities and will work to increase outreach to enhance relationships between the community and the department by adding one new program per year. Some examples of outreach include; PEACE discussions (Police Education and Community Engagement), the creation of a PACT (Police and Community Together) group which consists of a diverse representation from the community and Police Officer liaisons, Neighborhood Officer Program and the Roundtable. The increase will be in the form of new outreach, not previously measured. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Fiscal Health & Sustainability - Overtime Reduction -2,000 Hours +1,300 Hours -2,000 Hours The Police Department will work to reduce overtime by 2,000 hours. Focused areas of possible overtime reduction will include report writing, utilizing officers (already on duty) from other assignments to cover shortages in Patrol, and reassessing non-mandated training occurrences. Overtime went up this year to cover for vacant positions and the Police Department will still meet budgetary goals. POLICE WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Noise Complaints Received by Dispatch 2,106 1,950 1,900 1,900 Citations Issued 6,876 6,662 7,622 7,860 DUI Arrests 411 362 400 400 Police Calls for Service 38,300 39,480 40,664 41,884 Felony Offenses 1,188 1,212 1,248 1,285 Total Arrests 3,026 3,351 3,451 3,554 Phone calls received in the Communications Center 96,818 84,970 90,000 90,000 Property/Evidence Booked 7,435 7,665 7,800 7,900 Cases assigned for investigation 479 489 500 500 Public Records Requests Filled 49 78 80 80 DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Public Works SUMMARY The mission of the City of San Luis Obispo Public Works Department is to preserve and enhance city infrastructure for an accessible, safe and inclusive community experience. These Performance Measures are intended to monitor one or more aspects of that mission. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Increase the number of work orders for proactive preventive maintenance of city assets 5% annual increase 1% Increase 5% annual increase Increasing the percentage of total preventive work orders completed by staff in the areas of parks, city facilities, and streets maintenance. Preventive work orders prolong the city's existing infrastructure and city assets while reducing the risk of larger, more expensive projects in the future. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Enhance traffic safety for all modes of transportation A) 3% B) 2%, C) 2% A) 5.3% B) 4.2% C) 10.6% A) 3% B) 2% C) 2% Reduce traffic collisions: A) vehicle to vehicle, B) vehicle to bicycle, C) vehicle to pedestrian. Percentage amounts shown represent the reduction in collisions comparing the most recently completed Traffic Safety Report with the prior year Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Percentage of capital projects constructed in the budgeted year 85% 50% 85% Target completion of projects funded to construct improvements or maintain assets to 85% within the two-year financial plan. The goal of 85% takes into account unforeseen challenges such as obtaining permits and agreements from third parties, unforeseen field conditions, weather, etc. PUBLIC WORKS WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Total acreage of park inventory 540 550 550 570 Street miles maintained 197 197 197 197 Total transit riders 1,209,708 1,198,000 1,221,960 1,234,180 Total number of public parking spaces in the Downtown core 2,647 2,492 2,492 2,413 Internal service assets - Square feet of City facilities/total City fleet 221,176/296 221,176/320 221,176/320 221,176/320 Pavement Condition Index (PCI) 74 71 70 72 Total trench repairs 45 160 78 78 Bicycle Network; Class 1/2/3 in total miles 7.2/29.7/24 7.5/29.7/24 7.5/29.7/24 8.0/30.45/24 Total trees in the Urban Forest (public right of way/parks) 13,000/6,000 13,000/6,000 13,000/6,000 13,000/6,000 Corrugated Metal Pipe in Storm System 22% 22% 21% 20% DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE AND WORKLOAD MEASURES Department: Utilities SUMMARY The City of San Luis Obispo Utilities Department provides essential services that support the community’s health, well- being, and quality of life. Through its efforts, water for the community is safely transported, prepared, distributed, used, collected, treated and beneficially reused 365 days a year, 24 hours-a-day. Long range planning for water resources and infrastructure needs, environmental stewardship and business management required to provide these vital services are critical functions of the Utilities Department. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Drinking Water Compliance Rate (% Days) 100% 100% 100% Utilities compliance with the drinking water quality standards in effect for the Water Treatment Facility. The indicator is expressed as the percent of time each year that the water treatment facility is in full compliance with applicable drinking water quality requirements. Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Wastewater Treatment Effectiveness Rate (% Days) 100% 99% 100% Utilities compliance with the effluent quality standards and national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) permit for the Water Resource Recovery Facility. The indicator is expressed as the percent of time each year that the water treatment facility is in full compliance with applicable drinking water quality requirements. Meet Budget and Fiscal Policy Fund Balance Requirements Measure/Explanation Target 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Target 2018-19 Capital Improvement Projects Completion 100% 75% 100% Utilities Department’s progress in the 2017-19 approved capital improvement project plan. The indicator is expressed in the number of projects being on track to be completed during the 2017-19 Financial Plan. UTILITIES WORKLOAD MEASURES 2018/19 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET Measure 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Total Regulatory Inspections Performed 3,268 3,197 3,634 3,643 Hours of Regulatory Compliance Training 1,820 1,920 1,920 1,920 Public Education tours/events 89 95 111 111 Regulatory Reporting 805 820 815 815 One Water delivered (acre feet) 5,909 5,983 6,050 6,220 City of San Luis Obispo, Title, Subtitle 1 DATE: July 24, 2018 TO: City Council FROM: Chris Read, Sustainability Manager SUBJECT: City of San Luis Obispo Climate Achievements Mayor Harmon requested a list of climate action accomplishments to date. The following list is a high-level overview of important climate actions the City has completed, is currently implementing, or is considering in the near future. Although the list is not comprehensive, it does provide a story of past, present, and potential future achievements. As part of the Climate Action Plan update, staff will conduct a policy and accomplishments audit to create a comprehensive list. Completed • Prior to 2010: Solar panels installed at the Utilities Administration building and the Ludwick Community Center • 2012: Climate Action Plan adopted • 2013: Replaced all City street lights with high efficiency LED bulbs • 2014: Water Resource Recovery Facility energy efficiency retrofits and construction of a methane gas recapture plant to generate power • 2015: Circulation Element mode share objective (20 percent bicycle, 12 percent transit, and 18 percent walking, car pools, and other forms) • 2015: Circulation Element policy that the City shall strive to allocate transportation funding across various modes approximately proportional to the modal split objectives • 2015: Oil Divestment (prohibiting investment of city money to support the direct production or drilling of fossil fuels) • 2015: Letter to the County in opposition to Phillips 66 oil train project. • 2016: Climate Action Plan Progress Report completed • 2017: Single use container and straw ordinance • 2017: Climate Action as a Major City Goal • 2017: Creation of an internal Green Team to support implementation and collaboration • 2017: Signed Memorandum of Understanding with the "Community Climate Action Coalition" to support community communication and implementation • 2018: Hired Sustainability Manager In Process, Ongoing, and Upcoming • Community Choice Energy program development Memorandum City Administration Department ~ Office of Sustainability City of San Luis Obispo, Title, Subtitle 2 • Investment Grade Audits for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the Water Treatment Plant • Evaluation of installing over 40 EV chargers in public lots • Site assessments for on-site solar • Integration of sustainability and climate action into the Financial Plan and CIP process • Conversion of city fleet to electric/alternative fuel vehicles • Water Resource Recovery Facility (WRRF) energy efficiency project • City Farm, promoting sustainable agriculture and local food systems education • Plastic straws and bottle ordinance implementation • Green and energy conservation building and construction code updates • Short Range Transportation Plan implementation • Bicycle Transportation Plan implementation • Bicycle Path Maintenance Program • Building Maintenance and Improvement Program implementation • Water and Wastewater Element update and implementation • Wastewater Collection Infrastructure Renewal Strategy • Water Efficient Landscaping Standards • Greenbelt Protection Program implementation • Trip Reduction Incentive Program (TRIP) for City Employees • Support of emPower and other financing programs designed to specifically retrofit existing residential buildings Upcoming • Climate Action Plan update, including new targets consistent with and potentially exceeding SB32 • Assessment of the requirements to achieve a “net-zero carbon City” target • Identification of opportunity sites to create “net zero carbon district(s)” • Participation in Regional Energy Network supporting residential energy efficiency retrofits