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Candidate Orientation 2018City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016Mayor and City Council Candidate OrientationAugust 29, 2018Council Chamber1 AgendaWelcome & IntroductionsAbout the City & OrganizationOverview of Department FunctionsThe Budget & Goal Setting ProcessRole and Functions of the City CouncilCandidate Requests for InformationQuestions & AnswersClosing Comments City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016About the City & OrganizationDerek Johnson, City Manager3 Form of GovernmentSan Luis Obispo is a Charter City Council-Manager form of governmentFive-member city councilMayor elected for a two-year termCouncil appoints members of 18 advisory bodiesCouncil appoints City Manager & City AttorneyCity Manager serves as executive officer and implements council policiesCouncil-staff relations Role and Functions of the City CouncilLegislative and Adjudicatory ResponsibilitiesSet policiesAdopt legislationAdopt budgetApprove plansDecide community issuesHear appeals (adjudicatory)Brown Act Compliance & TimingEthics/Public Records and Other LawsCouncil SubcommitteesCouncil Liaisons to Advisory BodiesCity Representation on other bodies Full Service City Organizational ChartCitizensMayor and City CouncilAdvisory BodiesCity ManagerCity AttorneyPoliceFirePublic WorksUtilitiesCommunity DevelopmentParks & RecreationHuman ResourcesFinanceAdministrationInformation Technology Facts & Figures393 full-time equivalent staff and a variety of part-time staff45,000 residents, over 70,000 daytime population$153 million operating budget8,500 businessesTop revenue generators: sales tax, property tax, transient occupancy tax, utility users tax Guidance for Decision MakersGeneral PlanWater and Wastewater Master PlansPavement Management PlanParking Management PlanShort-Range Transit PlanActive Transportation PlanParks & Recreation Master PlanDowntown Concept PlanBudget and Fiscal Policies City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016Department Overviews10 City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016Parks & RecreationShelly Stanwyck, Director11 Department Overview16 full-time staff18 limited benefit staff Over 150 supplemental staffAdvisory BodiesPRCJack House CommitteeCommunity PartnersVolunteers ProgramsAdministrationAquaticsCommunityServices/EventsGolfPublicArtRangersSportsEvents & ActivitiesSLO TriSeptember ScrambleGobble WobbleSenior SoftballMovies in the MissionWater Safety DayClasses GaloreParks32 Parks and FacilitiesPocket Parks like Cheng and EtoNeighborhood Parks including Emerson and MitchellCitywide such as Sinshiemer and Laguna LakeFacilitiesOpen Space MaintenanceGolf Course MaintenanceDamon Garcia Sports FieldsSenior CenterLudwick Community CenterLibrary Community RoomsMeadow Park SLO Swim CenterSinshiemerStadiumKey Functions13 Community ImpactInspiring happiness in our residents’ lives.Active residents with a high quality of life.Numerous recreation options to fit a diversity of needs.Identification and planning for future needs of the community.Outreach and service to those in need. Facts & FiguresSenior Activities range from enrichment activities Senior Center to Aqua Aerobics at the Pool to multiple Golf Tournaments at Laguna Lake Golf Course.We provided child care to over 1000 families after school and during summer camps.Weddings, Birthdays, Graduation Parties and more were permitted and hosted by the public in our parks and at our facilities.Natural Resource protections occur daily with over 55 miles of trial have been maintained, mitigation projects undertaken and education and patrol provided.Another 750 participants completed the 39th Annual SLO Triathlon. Facts & FiguresBudget2018-19 Operational Budget of $4.3MRevenues2018-19 projected revenues of $1.7MCIP for 2018-19Master Plan and Element UpdateTennis Court Lighting ProjectPickleball Courts at French ParkBox Art CompletionOngoing Natural Resource Protection Strategic Plan Goals City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016Administration & Information TechnologyGreg Hermann, Interim Deputy City Manager19 Department Overview27 full-time staffAdministration: 14 full-time staffInformation Technology: 13 full-time staffAdvisory BodiesRevenue Enhancement Oversight CommissionTourism Business Improvement DistrictPromotional Coordinating CommitteeCommunity Partners City AdministrationOversees all City operationsStaff support for Revenue Enhancement & Oversight Committee (REOC)Special project managementOffice of the City ClerkCouncil meeting agenda coordinationElection administrationPublic Records RequestsAdvisory Body RecruitmentOffice of SustainabilityNatural Resources ProgramStormwater ProgramClimate Action & Community Choice EnergyEconomic Development & TourismEconomic Development Strategic Plan & Business Retention and Expansion Program• Staff support for the Tourism and Business Improvement District (TBID) Cultural Activities & Community PromotionsStaff support for the Promotional Coordinating Committee (PCC)Community Partnerships with local non-profits Key Functions - Administration21 Network Services DivisionProvide IT network and office automation supportManage the City’s communications systems, telephone, dispatch, telemetryImprove customer service through use of technologyInformation Services DivisionProvide GIS data management, maps & analysisMaintain citywide databases and applicationsSupport Services DivisionMaintain the IT Help DeskProvide technical support & training to users citywideSupport and manage software & technology hardwareKey Functions – Information Technology22 Community ImpactPrimary portal to City Council and City governmentConduct regular and special elections, including processing and certifying citizen-generated petitionsProtection of open space & natural lands surrounding the City and long-tern stewardship in coordination with the City’s Open Space TeamFacilitate a positive business environment through the business retention and expansion programImplementation and update of the Climate Action PlanCultural grants and non-profit agency supportAssist City maintain and enhance access and transparency through communications, technology and other means Facts & FiguresBudget:Administration - $4.9 millionInformation Technology - $3.2 millionProcess over 500 Council Agenda Reports and City Manager Reports annuallyActively seek funding and partnerships to add to the City’s greenbelt with over 7,000 acres protectedSupport 593 users of 800 computers and devices, 170 software applications, 8 operating systems, 224 servers, 320 cell phones & 900 telephone lines, at 32 different sites27 miles of City owned fiber optic cabling that connects most of the City sitesSupport emergency and non-emergencycommunication networks Upcoming ItemsAdminister 2018 ElectionLead implementation of Climate Action Major City GoalCommunity Choice EnergyLead implementation of the Fiscal Health and Responsibility Major City GoalRegional economic impact analysis related to the Diablo Canyon Power Plant closureImplementing the Fiscal Health Response PlanOpen space acquisition projects2019-2021 Financial Plan development City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016City Attorney’s OfficeChristine Dietrick, City Attorney26 Department OverviewStaffing:City Attorney, Christine DietrickAssistant City Attorney, Jon AnsolabehereParalegal, Kelly WhiteTemporary Legal AssistantsBudget: $872,000Includes authorization for $150,000 for temporary staffing, ending June 2019Mission:Provide high quality legal services to ensure legally and ethically supportable I implementation of City Council direction. Key FunctionsPrimary legal advisors to the City Council and Planning CommissionDraft/review ordinances, resolutions, contracts, other documentsAnnually, the City enters into approximately 500 contractsIn 2017, City Council adopted 100 ordinances and resolutionsAdminister Legislative PlatformRepresent and provide legal advice to the City as an institutionRepresent the City in litigation matters or supervise outside litigation counselCurrent litigation cases: 4 Cases recently resolved: 9 Current claims: 32Prosecute code enforcement actionsSince January 2018: 31 misdemeanor complaints filed for 92 citations; 2 receiverships 29BeforeCode Enforcement Results 30AfterCode Enforcement Results Proactive FocusWork closely with staff in all City departments to identify and resolve issues before they become legal problemsAdvise City Council and City Manager of emerging issues or areas of legal risk in City processesEvolving service delivery to meet demands of increasing scope, volume and complexity of issuesProvide training for City Council, Commissions, and staff Upcoming ItemsWater Resource Recovery Facility contract and biddingProject Labor Agreement negotiationsCommunity Choice Energy formation and implementationElection advice and support, including cannabis tax measureCannabis regulation implementation and enforcement supportDevelopment agreement and CFD implementation support (Avila and San Luis Ranch)Civil Litigation mattersPersonnel actions City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016Community DevelopmentMichael Codron, Director33 Department Overview37.5 full-time staffAdministration: 7 full-time staffDevelopment Review: 14 full-time staffLong Range Planning: 4 full-time staffBuilding & Safety: 12.5 full-time staff Key FunctionsPlanning and EngineeringBuilding and SafetyAdvisory Bodies:Planning CommissionArchitectural Review CommissionCultural Heritage CommitteeHuman Relations CommitteeConstruction Board of AppealsRepresent the City’s policies and interests in regional and state planning processes860 on the Wye Community ImpactImplement the City’s long-range vision for development, environmental quality, safety and historic preservationProvide a forum for public review of development projects at Planning Commission, Architectural Review Commission, Cultural Heritage Committee, and Hearing Officer meetingsEnsure buildings are constructed safely and that community aesthetics are maintained Facts & FiguresBudget: $5.1 millionRespond to an average of 65 phone calls and walk-in customers per day; expanding on-line access; and increased hours of operation of the public counter.During the last fiscal year:56 new affordable units added to the CityReceived 308 planning applicationsConducted 7,209 InspectionsResponded to 820 code enforcement complaintsChinatown Upcoming ItemsZoning Regulations Update and ImplementationFroom Ranch Specific PlanHousing Element UpdateElectronic Plan ReviewCitizen Self Service Portal Residential SubdivisionsOrcutt AreaAvila RanchSan Luis RanchClimate Action Plan UpdateCaudill Mixed-Use City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016FinanceBrigitte Elke, Interim Director39 Department Overview16.5 full-time staffIncluding contract employees dedicated to Motion projectBudget: $2.6 million Mission:The mission of the Finance Department is to safeguard the City’s resources and fiscal health – to implement financial policies, procedures, and reporting systems to serve the citizens and enable operating departments achieve their objectives. Key FunctionsAdministrationBudgetAccountingRevenue ManagementPurchasingMotion Project Community ImpactLong-term financial planningFinancial Plan development and public engagementProvide financial expertise and debt management Manage City’s budgetProduce financial reportsPurchasing & ProcurementOversee investment portfolioCollect City Revenue including TOT, business license and tax, and City departments’ revenuesProcess payroll & accounts payable payments Facts & Figures (all City Funds)Collect, record, and administer $137 million in revenue sourcesAccount, transact, and administer $162 million in operating, capital, and debt service budgets43%14%9%33%0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%50%TaxRevenuesGrants &SubventionsGF ServiceChargesEF ServiceChargeRevenues14%28%5%0%5%10%15%20%25%30%Operating Budgets CapitalImprovement PlanProjectsDebt ServiceExpenditures43 Upcoming ItemsFinalizing the City’s Comprehensive Annual Finance Report (CAFR)Preparation the 2019-21 Financial Plan and Five-Year ForecastImplementation of the Motion Project for Finance (10/2018), Human Resources (4/2019), and Budget (9/2019) City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016FireKeith Aggson, Deputy Fire Chief45 Department Overview57 full-time staff47 Sworn, 10 Non-Sworn1 part-time staff and 1 volunteerInternsMission:Protect the lives and property of the citizens and visitors of our City from the adverse effects of fires, medical emergencies and other dangers caused by man or nature.Fulfill our mission with courtesy and service by motivated, productive individuals who value their profession, co-workers and the community they proudly serve. Key FunctionsAll-Risk Emergency ResponseTrainingDepartment and City staffDisaster PreparednessCity staff and communityHazard PreventionFire Prevention Bureau”SupportAdministration and Technical Services Community ImpactProtect life and property by responding to medical emergencies, fires, technical rescues, hazardous materials incidents, other emergencies and requests for servicePromote public safety through Fire Prevention Programs including:Commercial Property InspectionsHazardous Materials Inspections and CompliancePlan ReviewMulti-family Dwelling Inspections (three or more units)Vegetation Management Partnership with Natural ResourcesProvide Public Education regarding disaster preparedness trainingEnsure excellent training to all City and department employees so they may better serve the community and maintain safety standards Facts & FiguresBudget: $12.8 millionOver 95% staffingRevenue: $ 1.4 millionMutual Aid revenue of $710,322Emergency Response Services6,669 responses in 2017Fire Prevention Services676 Multi-dwelling properties inspected489 Permitted facilities inspected54 Schools, preschools, hospitals, nursing homes and detention facilities inspected Strategic Plan 2018-2023Direction 1: Connecting with our CommunityDirection 2: Continuously Evaluating Programs and Service DeliveryDirection 3: Analyzing Relevant Data to Inform Decision MakingDirection 4: Improving Organizational Culture, Sustainability, and HealthDirection 5: Supporting Fiscal Sustainability in Department OperationsDepartment Strategy Leaders to track progress of performance City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016Human ResourcesMonica Irons, Director51 Department Overview5 full-time staff3 contract employees authorized through June 2019Mission:Helping employees realize their full potential so they can effectively serve our community. Key FunctionsRecruitment and selectionClassification and compensationSuccession planningEmployee development/trainingPerformance managementLabor relations/negotiationsStaff liaison to Personnel BoardWellnessBenefits administrationHealth and SafetyWorkers compensationLiability and property claims administrationHuman Resources Information System (new) Community ImpactPeople deliver the services to the community.Some turnover is healthy; excessive turnover is costly.High quality, well-trained, knowledgeable, dedicated, hard-working employees deliver services to the community in an efficient and effective manner. Facts & FiguresBudget:Human Resources: $1,202,642Risk Management: $ 4,518,043Liability - $1,742,400Workers Compensation - $2,490,843Other Insurances - $284,800Wellness: $18,600Support 393.55 full-time employees, 79.3 full time equivalent temporary or seasonal employees4 represented bargaining units (Fire, POA, SLOPSOA, SLOCEA)2 unrepresented (management and confidential)28% of employees will be eligible for retirement in next five years56% of regular recruitments are filled internally Upcoming ItemsRecruitment and Retention Complete negotiations with employee groups to achieve concessions outlined in the City’s Fiscal Health Response Plan by increasing employee contributions to retirement Continue work on 30 in 3, a three year initiative to reduce liability and workers’ compensation claims and costs that has resulted in roughly 10% cost reduction so far.Implement City’s first Human Resources Information System (modules within new ERP) to facilitate informed decision makingContinue to monitor, evaluate, and implement regulatory changes City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 201657PoliceDeanna Cantrell, Police Chief Department Overview85.5 full-time staff59 sworn; 26 non-swornSNAP (0-7) & volunteers (12)MissionWork in partnership to protect life and property, reduce and prevent crime, and improve quality of life. Pride – Service – IntegrityGoalsReduce HarmReduce crime and fear of crimeIncrease multi-modal safetyIncrease trust and community engagementStrengthen regional partnershipsStrengthen personnel resiliency and wellness PatrolRespond to calls for servicePrevention of crime anddisorderNeighborhood officer programField Service TechnicianDowntown Bicycle TeamTraffic SafetySpecial event planningTraffic enforcement and educationNeighborhood ServicesCoordinate SNAP, community and student outreachLiaison to neighborhoods, Cal Poly, Cuesta & SLO solutionsCommunity Action TeamHomeless services liaisonsMental health provider from TMHA and County BHKey Functions - Operations59 InvestigationsInvestigations of persons/ property crimesCannabis detectivesSpecial Operations Response TeamSpecial enforcement & covert operationsForensicsEvidenceEmergency CommunicationsAnswering and dispatching emergency and non emergency calls for service for police and fire.RecordsQA, processing over 8,000 police reports, over 7,000 citations, PRR’s, permits, sex offender registrations, restraining orders and much moreAdministration & FinancePolicy development, training, recruitment, internal investigationsBudget, grant management, technology managementKey Functions - Administration60 Community ImpactProtect life and propertyProblem solve beyond enforcement – through education, enforcement, engineeringCollaborate with community, businesses, other city departments, and state and local partners to prevent and reduce crime and deal with quality of life issuesIdentification and planning for future needs of the communityOutreach and service to those in needCommunity safety is a cornerstone to a vibrant city and creates an environment that people want to live in, work in and visit Total Phone Calls 101,917Total CFS (PD&Fire) 35,004PD CFS (w/ Officer Initiated)33,042Arrests 3,122DUI's 364Traffic cites 5,937Warnings 4,945InjuryAccidents 255Reports 8,073Noise 1,483DAC's456Downtown calls 5,076WorkloadFacts & Figures$14,472,622 $1,066,194 StaffingNon-StaffingPolice Department Budget FY 2018-19$15,538,8166.86%93.14%62 Facts & FiguresYear Pop Murder Rape RobberyAgg AssaultBurglary LarcenyMVTheftTotalCrime per 1000201747.2 0 39 23 111 172 1,516 941,95541201646.1 0 38 21 118 251 1,730 952,25349% Change 0 2.63% 9.52% -5.93% -31.47% -12.37% -1.05% -13.23%2017 Violent total 173 2017 Property total 1,7822016 Violent total 177 2016 Property total 2,076Totalchange -4 Totalchange -294% Change -2% % change -14.16%63 Issues & ChallengesContinuing to meet community needs and address increases in crime, special events, and calls for service within limited resources while maintain fiscal responsibilityHomeless and transient impactsAlcohol/drug related crimesNeighborhood wellnessNeeds for a new facility and cannabis implementationContinues implementation of strategic plan initiativesKeeping pace with technology changesLegislative impacts City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 201665Public WorksMatt Horn, Deputy Director Department Overview80 full-time staff44 part-time staffMissionPreserving and enhancing city infrastructure for an accessible, safe, and inclusive community experienceValuesPartnering for excellence, providing resultsVisionInspiring you to have the best day you’ve ever had. Strategic PlanProviding and managing excellent public assetsEnhancing productive relationshipsSupporting and developing staff Key FunctionsAdministrative Support ServicesTransportation Planning & EngineeringParks & Landscape MaintenanceCreek & Flood ControlParking ServicesFleet ServicesUrban ForestCIP EngineeringFacilities Maintenance ServicesStreet & Sidewalk MaintenanceTransit ServicesTraffic Signal & Street Lights Community ImpactTraffic safety, circulation and calming programsParking operations and enforcementPublic transitPublic infrastructure design, construction, and inspectionMaintenance for roads, sidewalks, trees, parks, traffic signals, public facilities, storm water facilities Facts & FiguresBudget:Operating $19.2 millionCapital $15 millionStreet Conditions – Pavement Condition Index 70Accessible Sidewalk Ramps, 2236 total crossings, 1571 with ADA rampsReplacement of aging Corrugated Metal Pipe (CMP) in Storm Drain system (22% of total 63 mile system)56 Bridges with an average rating of 78Vehicle Collisions reduced from 1100 in 2000 to 546 in 201715,000 completed work orders in Facilities Maintenance, Swim Center, Urban Forest, Streets Maintenance, Parks Maintenance, and Fleet Maintenance Facts & Figures143 street miles71 traffic signals56 bridges60 miles of bike lanes530 acres of parks 63 miles of storm drains18,900 trees26,515 parking citations293 vehicles1.1 million transit riders Upcoming ItemsMaintaining existing infrastructure, providing daily services, and funding future necessary projects within the Fiscal Health Response Plan guidelinesCompleting key projects for Major City Goals such as: Railroad Safety Trail and Anholm bikewayDelivering large scale, critical infrastructure such as: Prado Rd Overpass, Palm/Nipomo Parking GarageIncreased use of technology in Parking and Transit operations City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016UtilitiesCarrie Mattingly, Director73 Department Overview65 full-time staffMissionProviding essential services that support the community’s health, well-being, and quality of life. One Water• Protecting public health and safety• Protecting and recovering natural resources• Providing clean potable water• Providing water and system for fire protection• Providing recycled water for reuse• Providing a way to take away human waste –water andsolidKey Functions75 Upcoming IssuesWater Resource Recovery Facility ProjectWorkforceRegional water management and collaborationCaring for an aging infrastructureEngaging the community in learningOperating and capital costs – utilities, chemicals, people, supplies Facts and Figures15,400 system connections1.75 billion gallons of water treated1.2 billion gallons wastewater treated386 miles of pipeline combinedFive sources of water (3 reservoirs, groundwater, recycled)1.6 million gallons highly treated water to San Luis Obispo Creek Water Fund Budget$0$5,000,000$10,000,000$15,000,000$20,000,000$25,000,000$30,000,000$35,000,000$40,000,0002017-18 Approved 2018-19 Approved 2019-20 Proposed 2020-21 Proposed 2021-22 Proposed 2022-23 ProposedWater ExpendituresOperating & DebtCIPTotal2017‐18 Approved2018‐19 Approved2019‐20 Proposed2020‐21 Proposed2021‐22 Proposed2022‐23 ProposedOperating & Debt $20,019,852 $20,180,563 $20,157,060 $20,811,651 $21,573,949 $21,846,611CIP $9,814,285 $1,335,850 $6,815,287 $11,435,848 $1,768,419 $14,064,147Total $29,834,137 $21,516,413 $26,972,347 $32,247,499 $23,342,368 $35,910,758 Sewer Fund Budget$0$10,000,000$20,000,000$30,000,000$40,000,000$50,000,000$60,000,000$70,000,000$80,000,000$90,000,0002017-18 Approved 2018-19 Approved 2019-20 Proposed 2020-21 Proposed 2021-22 Proposed 2022-23 ProposedSewer ExpendituresOperating & DebtCIPTotal2017‐18 Approved2018‐19 Approved2019‐20 Proposed2020‐21 Proposed2021‐22 Proposed2022‐23 ProposedOperating & Debt $11,578,620 $11,261,444 $14,204,049 $14,458,608 $17,745,147 $17,970,409CIP $22,695,120 $16,082,583 $69,517,234 $45,100,179 $20,101,436 $2,647,452Total $34,273,740 $27,344,027 $83,721,283 $59,558,787 $37,846,583 $20,617,861 Goal Setting and the Budget Process Major City GoalsClimate ActionMultimodal TransportationHousingFiscal Health and ResponsibilityOther Important ObjectiveDowntown Vitality Budget ChallengesEconomic climate will change – predicting when is tricky and by how much is even trickierDiablo Canyon Power Plant closure creates regional impacts and uncertainty for City revenue & expenditure projectionsAddress long-term liabilities and infrastructureMaintain the services expected by community while identifying and accomplishing new goals 2018- 2021 Fiscal Health Response Plan$8.9 million total reduction over 3 years30 - 40%20 - 30%30 - 40%General FundRevenuesNew Ways of Doing BusinessOperating ReductionsConcessions Total Expenditures by FundActual Budget Budget 16-17 17-18 18-19Governmental Funds:General Fund66,235,922         81,923,922           73,868,342         (1,467,832)        -2%Other Funds8,937,503           28,930,621           22,797,929         1,497,855         7%Total Governmental Funds75,173,425         110,854,543         96,666,271         30,023               0%Enterprise / Agency / Internal Service FundWater Fund19,069,790         28,901,866           20,067,054         (9,287,494)        -32%Sewer Fund11,683,263         30,050,826           26,443,651         (42,485,286)     -62%Parking Fund3,791,493           6,801,040             4,746,581           226,667             5%Transit Fund4,076,870           4,448,245             4,166,809           (794,845)           -16%Whale Rock Reservoir Fund1,035,679           2,165,662             1,270,683           22,001               2%Boysen Ranch Conservation‐                        7,500                      7,500                   ‐                      0%Total Enterprise & Agency Funds39,657,096         72,375,138           56,702,278         (52,318,957)     -48%Grand Total114,830,522       183,229,681         153,368,549      (52,288,934)     -25%2017 - 19 Financial Plan Variance % Change General Fund UsesActual Budget Budget 16-17 17-18 18-19Expenditures Operating ProgramsCommunity Safety 28,104,081 32,396,209 31,772,623 (621,621) -2%Infrastructure & Transportation 10,482,258 10,198,619 11,307,026 (667,737) -6%Culture & Recreation 3,506,780 6,475,972 3,687,670 (163,413) -4%Environmental Health & Open Space 874,057 1,847,292 1,107,516 (89,127) -7%Community & Neighborhood Livability 8,834,808 6,179,608 8,802,413 632,901 8%Fiscal Health & Governance 11,275,461 14,758,205 13,235,933 (160,096) -1%CalPERS Discount Rate - - - (375,000) -100%Total Operating Programs63,077,445 71,855,905 69,913,182 (1,444,092) -2%Reimbursed Expenditures (4,164,747) (4,264,633) (3,917,663) 346,970 -8%Total Operating Expenditures58,912,698 67,591,272 65,995,519 (1,097,122) -2%Capital Improvement Plan Projects 4,080,548 10,957,892 4,687,323 (50,000) -1%Debt Service 3,242,676 3,374,758 3,185,500 (320,710) -9%Total Expenditures 66,235,922 81,923,922 73,868,342 (1,467,832) -2%Other Sources (Uses)Operating Transfers In 2,109,723 5,056,700 3,773,902 (683,456) -15%Operating Transfers Out (9,614,658) (6,681,962) (6,719,850) (108,592) 2%Proceeds from Debt Financing - - - - 0%Projected MOA Adjustments - - - - 0%Expenditure Savings - 1,268,462 1,300,000 - 0%Total Other Sources (Uses) (7,504,935) (356,800) (1,645,948) (792,048) 93% Variance % Change2017 - 19 Financial Plan General Fund RevenuesActual Budget Budget %2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 Variance ChangeSales & use taxGeneral 16,737,007 16,487,213 17,217,036 (59,964) -0.3%Public safety (Proposition 172) 405,512 436,560 402,572 (42,719) -9.6%Property tax 10,756,477 11,145,228 11,665,385 58,385 1%Property tax in lieu of VLF 4,353,912 4,637,535 4,846,013 - 0%Transient occupancy tax 7,367,592 7,293,790 7,367,000 (72,666) -1.0%Utility users tax 5,539,405 5,568,000 5,617,000 - 0%Franchise fees 1,557,128 1,582,442 1,526,717 - 0%Business tax certificates 2,372,248 2,746,896 2,884,241 - 0%Real property transfer tax 332,314 380,878 388,495 - 0%Fines & Forfeitures 139,534 147,600 147,600 - 0%Investment & Property 115,544 264,798 264,798 - 0%Subventions & Grants 1,014,859 1,885,560 385,560 - 0%Police Services 620,603 480,604 606,309 126,056 26%Fire Services 909,503 721,752 989,501 256,923 35%Development Review 5,536,927 6,153,878 5,870,363 (110,868) -2%Parks & Recreation 1,657,645 1,822,400 1,835,745 (21,715) -1%General Government 394,376 424,449 430,760 - 0%Other revenues 172,902 67,217 118,200 52,000 79%Local Revenue Measure 7,376,456 7,445,096 7,673,084 (5,916) -0.1%Total 67,359,943 69,691,895 70,236,380 179,515 0.3%2017-19 Financial Plan 2018-19 Authorized Regular StaffingAUTHORIZED FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STAFFING BY DEPARTMENTBudget BudgetDEPARTMENT & PROGRAM 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19CITY ADMINISTRATION 25.00 25.00 26.25CITY ATTORNEY'S OFFICE 3.00 3.00 3.00COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 36.00 32.40 32.90FINANCE 12.50 12.50 12.50FIRE 57.00 57.00 57.00HUMAN RESOURCES 5.00 5.00 5.00PARKS & RECREATION 18.00 18.00 18.00POLICE 86.50 85.50 85.50PUBLIC WORKS 84.30 84.30 84.30UTILITIES 69.10 69.10 69.10TOTAL 396.40 391.80 393.552017-19 Financial Plan Candidate Requests for InformationPlease coordinate through the City Clerk’s Office (Memo Dated 6/12/18)Ensures follow-upEnsures consistent access and responseWhat one candidate receives you all will receiveFor simple requests about City services, please feel free to contact the Department Head directly. Department Head will follow the protocol to get all candidates substantive information. Department ContactsFor more information about City services, please go to the City’s web site at: www.slocity.orgDepartment contact information:Derek Johnson, City Manager 781-7114Greg Hermann, Interim Deputy City Manager 781-7194Teresa Purrington, City Clerk 781-7102Christine Dietrick, City Attorney 781-7140Garret Olson, Fire Chief 781-7380Monica Irons, Human Resources Director 781-7250Shelly Stanwyck, Parks & Recreation Director 781-7294Deanna Cantrell, Police Chief 781-7337Michael Codron, Community Development Director 781-7187Carrie Mattingly, Utilities Director 781-7205Brigitte Elke, Interim Finance Director 781-7124Daryl Grigsby, Public Works Director 781-7207 Swearing In and Appointments of Newly Elected OfficialsCharter Specifies that this will occur on:1st Day of December at twelve o’clock noon following the electionDue to higher voter turn out expected from new election laws enacted in 2017 & 2018, the County may not have the certified results until December 6th Possible dates for Swearing In and Appointments will be between December 3-9, 2018 City 101Day of Welcome – August 24th, 2016Questions91