Loading...
Police Dept Strategic PlanSan Luis Obispo Police Department Strategic Plan 2016-2020 J1111111111111111111,11111121 2 MESSAGE FROM THE DEPARTMENT .............................................. ..................... STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK........................................................................................... 4 ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW........................................................................... 5 VISION, MISSION & VALUES....................................................................................... 6 STRATEGIC PLAN COMPONENTS................................................................................ 7 EVOLUTION OF OUR STRATEGIC PLAN............•....•..................................................... g PLANNING PROCESS.................................................................... IMPLEMENTATION & EVALUATION.............................................................................12 STRATEGIC PLAN DIRECTIONS ................................................................................... STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS #1 Reduce Crime....................................................................................................14 #2 Promote Organizational Excellence .................................................................... 16 #3 Enhance Internal & External Relationships . ...... #4 Advance Technology .................................................. #5 Enhance Infrastructure ..................•.....• ............................... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS---..---...... STRATEGIC PLAN 2016 -2020 On behalf of the men and women of the San Luis Obispo Police Department we are pleased to introduce our 2016-2020 Strategic Plan. Our employees have been engaged in the process of building this 5 -year plan for some time and are pleased to see it come to fru- ition. The implementation of a strategic plan is new territory for our agency and we are ex- cited as to what it will deliver for our community in the form of continued quality service, professionalism and organizational excellence. This Strategic Plan will be a flexible, living document that will prepare the department for the future as we remain true to our vision and goals. Through the plan we will confront emerging issues, introduce progressive police practices and perform our duties with pur- pose in order to reduce crime, build relationships and enhance the quality of life for all we serve. We look forward to working in partnership with the community to accomplish these goals as outlined in this Strategic Plan. Members of the San Luis Obispo Police Department STRATEGIC PLAN 2016 -2020 4 The San Luis Obispo Police Department has embarked on the implementation of a 5 -year Strategic Plan. The purpose of the plan is to identify, navigate and complete a variety of objectives to enhance our organization's ability to serve the community. Employees at all levels within the organization have been and will continue to be engaged in the develop- ment and execution of this plan to maximize our ability to achieve success. The development of the plan included several analytical components. The San Luis Obispo Police Department partnered with California Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to conduct a work assessment study in December 2013. The results provided an analysis and evaluation of the Department's calls for service and staffing needs based on several different models. Outcomes from the assessment were used as a foundation for a series of planning efforts, including a management team building workshop, workforce and community surveys and the development of a Steering Committee made-up of a cross section of police depart- ment employees and other City management personnel. Sostrin Consulting was selected to provide facilitation experience to integrate all aspects of the planning process and to provide a series of facilitated meetings with the Steering Committee to position the organization to achieve its strategic objectives. This strategic plan is intended to be dynamic and has the ability to be augmented based upon critical inputs such as fiscal constraints and crime trends to meet emerging needs. The plan not only provides direction but is intended to enhance accountability and improve efficiencies that translate to improved public safety and an enhanced quality of life. STRATEGIC PLAN 2016 -2020 The San Luis Obispo Police Department consists of 86.5 (FTE) employees, 60 of which are sworn police officers. The Department is divided into two bureaus, with a Police Captain commanding each. The Operations Bureau handles Patrol Services, the Traffic Safety Unit, and Neighborhood Services. The Administrative Services Bureau handles all administrative and fiscal services as well as the Investigative Division, the Communications Division, and the Records Unit. The Department employs a temporary part-time Operations Support Clerk and several temporary part-time Student Neighborhood Assistance Program (SNAP) employ- ees that respond to noise complaints. 5 STRATEGIC PLAN 2016 -2020 Our Vision: "TO BE RECOGNIZED BY OUR COMM UNITY AND EMPLOYEES AS A MODEL OF EXCELLENCE IN THE LAW ENFORCEMENT PROFESSION, " Our Mission: 'THE MISSION OF THE SAN LUIS OBISPO POLICE DEPARTMENT IS TO MAINTAIN A SAFE CITY BY WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE COMMUNITY TO PROTECT .LIFE AND PROPERTY PREVENT AND Our Values: SERVICE, PRIDE., AND INTEGRITY SCE Opp v � dr;is° A STRATEGIC PLAN 2016 -2020 SAN LUIS OBISPO POLICE DEPARTMENT STRATEGIC PLAN DIRECTIONS i k dl pip cf,) ej C*imine J Framicat"ejOriganlzati'�naI F , . ExsC�e'i l�e�r�ace, Einnhainacej Enat"emilaJ _ E-E.xt,,',e:,,vnj),a0 Rellati n s, ' jit r �S, p� A�. aTJ JJ1� oIO E n h� - jmi e I nifrasit'lmsc�tore Du■ Caro '4oslui s►r&ogM DilrecMin 1: MEDUCE CRMO �9Ji�!ya _'. Erntance;rlme Prsv!anriOn in,ira7�ea Responsibility: 0 `_ L?implementSpillman Dashboard Module &Crime Analysis Capdbillttes December31,2016 1_,1_2zce Educational Outreacn to Reduce Property Related Crimes December 31. 2016 nAdtC P fr iDecember 31, 2016 1.1.4ce Directed Giving arKxygn bevona the anC or the April December 31, 2016 Drug Awareness EduCpllprio� Proramdo-Greci'�-"-- December 31, 2018 behind schedule attainable response time goals December 31, 2018 behind schedule 1r]1Lx.1[v� �ntl[1riGe Erttall'9[l1Bnr lnl}IdriVdS Responsibility: 0 1 2• r� Expand Public Safety Video Capabilities — — December 31, 2016 1.2.2 RBfine Acttve Shooter Protocol and Training December 31, 2016 1.2.3 Expand Community Civility Outreach & Education — December 31, 2016 4 ✓ nimnce tAOGlle 6 IC@ �dpr klff95;hr'alJ�h i�C1VanCeC TralCiy� Decernber31, 2016 R6tis ch & Draft Proposal for a K-9 Program _ - — December 31, 2017 pending 1.2.6 Conpuet Assessment of Team Based Scheduling December 31, 2017 Cewar-f Rercogrutrt E vlovees r77,,,,t,. 0 Employee Recognition ProgramDecember 31, 2016 ate Employee Peer Support &Critical Incident Stress ProgramDecember 31, 2016am meta jEnhoncwe 42-12 port & Encourage Department Voluntary Involvement in PACEDecember 31, 2016 H5f2 er Advisement Program !MentoringDecember 31, 2017 elop programs/initiatives to improve employee morale December 31, 2018 behind schedlle r Develop the Orgoniz~ Resporislbillty: 0 2 2 1 rate Risk Manogemenr uasiOn ro evetop and Implement isk - IWLRW_Q9in 5trarg-Qi%— ' December 31, 2016 22.2..2 `~ 2 Create Use of Force Annual Review Process `— 2.2.3 �SSBSS Feaslt7111ty of ReplOCfng Administrative $ergeoni PoslHpn W1ftt a December 31, 2016 - :f31'r7glt3f A - GP i1_E^QLQY2ff_— December 31, 2016 :arnpw*E 22.2.4.4 Assess Management Structure in investigations December 31. 2016 — � r, 7mCrlare 7.2.5 Study Need for Civilian Cyber Crime Investigator December 31, 2016 ea 2.2.6 Develop an Employee Physical Fitness Program 2.7 Study Work Load fqi Swam Sfa�rtg M1leeCis In IhePotr+,l Dlvisdon December 31, 22.017 r:l}rr4'1t81p In t,�n fir, 1 �i Ffnor,� 1 pl December 31, 2017 i r; yarn 2Z8 Stuciv Walk Land and nQ Ver7ds in The Support 5enrlcBs vlsk7n M pr n t H1 1�i- I Pinion December 31, r l 2.2;,9 Shady Work Land and Staffing Needs In the Administration pivlsk7n In 2017 ` - --Pffor the 2019-2[321 Fin ! P{ n-� 2.2.10 Studv Work lAad fqr NOn}jwOrn 5�1�} lvpgd3 in the patrol December 31, 2017 c ,rr,� y DnrlsJon December 31, 2017 3333 Evaluate the feasability of hiring Community Service Officers December 18, 2018 behind schedule 3.2:.1;1 1101ote Internal Affairs Process December 31 2017 L"Hire additional records staff to work the front window December 31 2018 Ska*9'0A�McpAon NY7Fil1 U & FXIER Ai KLAilOAMH1PS - - e3�1 �A11111CF Objective 3 1. Sheng"W COmrtnuwy Relationships Responslbllty: 0 &)A Develop Chaplain Program December 31, 2016 W- _ 3-1-2 3.1.2 Bxamine "nfiol Ltse or TBr_hrxalogy t0 pmort r+lelghbprhood - __ 11 _ _ _ December 31, 201 b - Y Y 3.1T3 _ Exppnd Volunteer Program December 31, 2018 behind schedule 3.1.4 t:nable Community Access to the W9t• Bi]sed CnR'fg t1Ap'pt]Iry� _ _ th I 4 N December 31, 2016 :C�+17late 3.1-5 _ Create a SLOPCitizens Academy December 31, 2019 8rt SCPl0 3.1.6 Create a SLOPExplorers Post December 31, 2018 ons t '�Sl1 '�'•� ,d.� Strengthen InISOnt(a Governmentd IZWhc,!Wl ip5 Respom1bry.. 0 ILL rQ . implement and monitor wL)u agreement with Call Polyfa lit rlee n . - CCllabarate Witt+ City oWnd CpmfrlUtlity St4keMolders to PrOCIUCe December 31, 2016 »4r101me _ VfQeo MpSSOwr� 'm P CCIQOGrate with School District to Expand December 31, 2017 Al&h3 ampul Cenipred Critical in n r - December 31, 2016 to 3�4 Develop a Joint Proto.Col with the Fir$ DBpartment fpr luson December 31, 2016 cr-r rg 5lrv►9& M*CHOO A ADVANCE TECHNOEaGr moi" Try�a-G I TBC"rnoiogy SuppOrr I InfrastnJcrure3 Responsibility 0 4_—LI Improve Dispatch Center Audio Recording Equipment December 31, 2016 tt'Al6t@ _ ACClulre arra Integrate Tooticptl RolaOl into the Regional SWAT -�- T _ _ t i A December 31. 2016 _ 4�E Reploce Work Scheduling Program December 31, 2016 � 41� CrBvte a Digital SLOPD Historical Photograph Library December 31, 2016 4- LS Patter wilh� td Coordinate cr Ponce i]otabaseinta atyragc rilty -.- ntn�r u rC 8d bya��ytslc tpnqu t¢nt December 31, 2017 pending _-? _ Implerrlent Next Generation Text to 911 Upgrades December 31, 2017 44.117 implement Next Generation Video & Images 911 Upgrades December 31, 2018 pending Try e d 2 AK?vame Car un,4A al On rA{Trl[}1oW R®spomlbluty: 0 4.2-1-1 Implement Electronic Citation and Report Writing December 31, 2019 4.2-2 Impiefnent a 4OT Program Fora Odv worn Camara ogrom and n l Fes__ December 31, 2016 Research. Request and Implement Mobile Fingerprint Scanning _— t hry It 1 F nigrir>_ J --' December 31, 2018 behind schedule _ 4-2-4 rt8SLt7rch ' Request and Implement Pocfaf R6aogni on T6;-FnU1-Og ,R F. AL, December 31, 2018 behind schedule biter: tfort S: ENHANCE AYF1Z�i11tfJC `. �GrrVe S._ EMOnr@ BxistMg pglrl'� Ft]L'lllty Responsibility: 0 emodel Men's Shower/Bathroom 5,.0 _4Enh. December 31, 2016 F3 sj1.2 -emodel of Upstairs Break Room of -- --- December 31, 2016 C;mr>i37e 5 d iprove Patrol Equipment Inventory System and Storage Capabilities December 31, 2016 nce desk area in the records unit December 31, 2018 pending Objective 5.2: LorV Tvmfj. otic Sm" FOCIIly ResponslbllFfy: 0 5.2.1 Implement a CIll. AssessmenT for a New Police BUliding at I ng Lo. atl�� December 31. 2017 } 51.2 Draft a Shooting Range & training Center Improvement Plan T December 31, 2018 1h :yam .. ,�.. .. moi. . MON "4t r ani 4- ftv fS� it `n"•�' , �„- � ' y' :� f' i tt' � �• � . v� � �F�;J:•:'i,��•.d'-r •'�'�a"'nwr'” !tom '�.. 114 _ tl i5ri ` � : ' . 7�.} rp• • ,,.r ' �� .�`r• iii ..- r+ r w� IF .. sl..rc: �fR r i i 1h :yam .. ,�.. .. moi. . MON "4t r ani 4- ftv fS� it `n"•�' , �„- � ' y' :� f' i tt' � �• � . v� � �F�;J:•:'i,��•.d'-r •'�'�a"'nwr'” !tom '�.. 114 _ tl i5ri ` � : ' . 7�.} rp• • ,,.r ' �� .�`r• iii ..- r+ r w� IF .. sl..rc: �fR :t 'J t� A ^� -a � U � (D O 06 N cn i .> O c (n c� C U N N L O O I C s_. 0 0 .}.j uj `� N •U �, C � N (6 U O L m O �-- a C red LO N O p I ) Q) O O W 0 > L Q • L. -I--� C C N Q 4--j p ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ �r f R ■ m ■ R A ■ m ; ff T Z D = mon (n CC) 7' CD � LD. c0 °- o m C) � m < ca cD c� o a W n C cD -p / T1 �- cn cn cD C CD o v Q a vo90 v o CD v m m cn I v CD cn r+ n _CD cn cn 0 `�o 3 o �' _ l< �V o cQ n v cn Z3.Z3 ( --S a —_� cn zr cn cn 0- C.0 w 0 � (D 0a mw cn cn Q. n m v cn cD cn L H U Cly H O p cc •O N � � CYI� d7 �— 0 oo 0 O c N cd LL 0 C- E Ca C a) LD U C 5-- + CCS ' L U E O CCS U � U O4-1..Q_ O � L CL c 0 > C: (D > �' � — a. - a� 0 0 U O _ OO O 4-a .,� L- L CCS �O Ccn C ' O Cll C +-, O -D O O N tt �_+ CCf .� CCS ca C O cn O C U O V -O � � E O � � p> O OR p � a- a- o U m Cll — O U ■ 0 i 0 K m L N C L .V O O O CL N IR L C O L U E 4-1 Q (� U) �- o • — L) cn a a CV N 0 c V) c LSA > C O v C O U C� 1 0Q) LO m C .-. O U)L C L N O L a� C U C -o o f C 4- Co CL d C O (% >, N fn v � O f t O _ f C C:c') fn C E \ (n LO C N > p 0 L- C:C 0).,! N Q 0CL m N U p O C U O .� E O O O L c T O m C �r L O Q > fn C� N U) L C C O oCis C- C O O O U U C L C O c LO map L as c�CD > cn LL w p L U+ 'c_ •� -a O o, Q) U Q■ ■■ E Q M • U QU' N 0 a. m c N -0 ■ ■ C� W a ■ Q ■ ■ "l: U) L U_ O N � C � O C6 F— C: — C:U_ O U a� c m � 0 E 0 O = ■ C O L Q� U_ O O1 O O CL fly C O • Lo i C6 U U N i EO V N 42 (D U O N A U (II f 00 U m N "QO•a� c N � Z � O� 0 L a)O L a. ■ LLcz ■ ■ 0.. ■ ■ w w ■ U) L U_ O N � C � O C6 F— C: — C:U_ O U a� c m � 0 E 0 O = ■ ANNUAL REPORT 2016 IVIE66AGI \' Dear community members, I am pleased to present the San Luis Obispo Police Department Annual Report for 2016- starting next year this report will be published biennially and will reflect two years of accomplishments for our department. Policing has grown significantly more challenging with increases in crime in much of California, tightening budgets, and decreasing trust in law enforcement nationally. The San Luis Obispo Police Department knows we must partner with the community to resolve those challenges, We cannot reduce crime without a strong relationship with our community who are willing to support our efforts and help us prevent crime by reporting and engaging in neighborhood well- ness. We cannot repair our damaged relationships without a community that is willing to engage openly and honestly in the process. We are incredibly fortunate to have a community in San Luis Obispo that understands this and whole heartedly partners with us in this effort. Written on these pages are successes from men and women that are community members, police officers, professional staff and volunteers. I hope this report provides you with clarity of your mission, our vision and the direction the San Luis Obispo Police Department is going. We have worked incredibly hard for you and have accomplished many goals over the last year. As we move forward in 2017, we will continue to build upon our accomplishments as we also strive to improve, innovate and develop best practices for crime reduction, employee wellness and community engagement that will enhance the lives of all who live in, work in and visit San Luis Obispo. I arr extremely proud and honored to bE the Chief of Police for such a dedicat. ed police department, community ana city. We are your police department. Chief Deanna Cantrell San Luis Obispo Police Department I I fIt ULI MEN The San Luis Obispo Police Department is comprised of 85.5 employees; 59 sworn and 26.5 professional staff. The department has two bureaus, Operations and Administrative Services. MISSION The mission of the San Luis Obispo Police Department is to maintain a safe city by working in partnership with the community to protect life and property, prevent and reduce crime, and improve the quality of life in our neighborhoods while preserving the rights of all through a commitment to Service, Pride and Integrity. VISION To be recognized by our community and employees as a model of excellence in the law enforcement profession. ofivfcptpbko w AdmmWTdOft AMT "&Sam, Mt 40 ILK-- I�A 111 F Np, jAd—u f w Pot fii UevW 41'al Frw]y3t Ill Day st'ge Q,� . Iii . . , Ad g—1eon —, Pot r DI Leel[3) OMCLfs (141 Oftefs (a) I I]) t'. Tab. A(Mon Tchm 12) Iii "&Sam, Mt 40 ILK-- I�A Daytime Bike Officers • The two daytime officers deal with a variety of calls for service ranging from theft -related crimes to aggres- sive panhandling • Officers work closely with the San Luis Obispo Downtown Association security personnel to coordinate activity and provide outreach with downtown businesses. • Officers also work closely with the Community Action Team (CAT) offic- ers to identify problems and crime trends that negatively impact the quality of life for residents, business owners and visitors to the City of San Luis Obispo. L - i ir r Night Bike Officers • Most nighttime enforcement activity in the downtown is related to alco- hol consumption. • Officers work closely with nighttime establishments to help ensure they are operated in a safe and lawful manner. • Officers conduct regular training sessions with employees of restau- rants and nightclubs to help combat underage drinking and excessive alcohol consumption. v�svi�v9vl vl I Y /�l� ! !<.JiV I tAIVI (U/Al \The department's CAT team collaborates with other agencies to address trends that negatively impact city residents, business owners and visitors to the City of San Luis Obispo. g y Success Story In 2016 CAT was able to assist a homeless man living in San Luis Obispo by reuniting him with an old friend from his past. This friend helped relocate him to the Los Angeles area, where a job and shelter was lined up for him. Previously, this individual had been a chronic alcoholic and homeless in our city for many years and was the source of numerous calls for service. Thankfully, the CAT team worked hard to reunite him with a friend and he was able to get his life back on track. Respect SLO,-p A Bench Ordinance Crty benches may be used for up to one hour or for three hours in a 24 hour period. SLMC 9 40 Illegal Lodging Lodging on public or pnvate property without permission is pro�hibitecj. PC 6.47(e) No Blocking of Sidewalks No Smoking Without Permit Public sidewalks, streets. alleys and rights of in Public Places way must bE kept clear of any obstruction. Smoking in public is WHEELCHAIR ACCESS MUST BE prohibited when others are MAIt1TAlf)E© AT ALL TIMES. SLOMC 12 04.020 present. SLOMG 8.16.030 Littering is prohibited. PC 347 (a. Soliciting Ordinance Aggressive soliciting is not perm+ttec Threatening, intimidating and bullying for donations of money or other Mems is prohibited SLMC 9,06.020 Panhandlinglot not �s permitted within 25 feet of any ATM, 6 feet from a business entrance, 10 feet of any intersection Of on any roadway. SLMC 9.06.025 Alcohol Prohibited Consumption or possession of an open container of alcohol in public is prohibited_ SINC 9.04.040 Public urination or defecation is prohibited SLMC 920 050 Anyone found in public who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol and is unable to care for themselves or others will be arrested for public intoxication. PC 647 {fl www.slocity.org The responsibilities of the Traffic Team include: • Traffic control and event planning for a large number of special pro- grams and events. in- cluding sporting activi- ties, parades and other local festivities • Review and submission of DUI cost recovery claims Maintenance of all traffic related equip- ment • Collection, investigation and management of traffic complaints Traffic officers work closely with the City's Traffic Engi- neering and Community De- velopment departments and neighborhood groups to improve traffic safety issues. The Traffic Team actively participates in traffic safety programs such as Click It or Ticket, Child Safety Seat Week, Safe Routes to School, Every 15 Minutes, MADD, Distracted Driving Month and school traffic safety presentations. Do you have a traffic concern? Click here to email the Traffic Division, be sure to include specifics about location. The Traffic Sergeant manag- es annual grants, such as the Office of Traffic Safety AVOID and STEP grants. These grants focus on reducing fa— tal and injury DUI crashes throughout the year and es— pecially during special holi— day periods with statistically high DUI collisions. SLOPD partners with the City's Parks and Recreations Department, the Public Works Department, the SLO County Bicycle Coalition, and local bike shops to host an annual "Bike Rodeo" to teach bike safety and basic skills to children cycling on the road. Ll f� Other specialized assignments the Records Clerks perform include: • Entering Restraining Orders • Processing massage, taxi, mobile food ven- dor and CCW permits • Registering sex, arson and drug registrants • Entering field interview cards • Entering disturbance advisement cards Processing ride along forms Posting daily activity logs to the internet Responding to subpoenas for records • Responding to informal discovery requests • National Crime Information Center valida- tions • Court -Ordered Records Sealings • Signing off correctable citations • Issuing Clearance Letters The Operations Support Specialist is a part- time position in the Records Unit. Duties in- clude: • This position meets with the Sex, Drug, and Arson Registrants processing their monthly and annual paperwork. • In addition to working with registrants this position processes backgrounds, Field Inter- view cards, Disturbance Advisements, and conducts other data processing. This allows the Records Clerks to process reports more efficiently. In 2016, the Records Clerks processed 8,903 Reports and 7,048 Citations. ti y ..G • New audio recording equipment was installed which consolidated servers between the police department and emergency communications center. It also provides advanced technology to tie the CAD system with the recording system to streamline packaging calls. The communications supervisors now have a quality assurance module and a more methodical way to pull Emergen- cy Medical Dispatch (EMD) calls for monthly critiques. • A 9-1-1 phone upgrade was completed in February. The State 9-1-1 office pro- vides for upgrades every five years to stay current with advancing technolo- gies. This system has improvements preparing our center to receive text to 9-1-1. This will be an upcoming count- ywide project. • Rapid Dispatch: Dispatch and City Fire are conducting a 6 -month pilot pro- gram that has the potential to reduce total response times by as much as two minutes. This one change can result in an 18% increase in survival rates for cardiac arrest patients. The pilot pro- gram began in the fall of 2016 and will be finalized spring of 2017. 4W 6■ The Communications Technicians and their Supervisors were nominated as a team for Employee of the Year and received the award! The nomination read in part "Although they worked many extra hours covering for extended absences and shortage of personnel, they performed their jobs with grace and extreme professionalism." • Structure fire — in the first 10 minutes two people dispatched fire and police to the scene and answered 76 incoming phone and radio requests. This hectic and almost overwhelming pace continued for hours. • 9-1-1 call (open line) - One dispatcher kept pinging for updated locations while listen- ing to anything she could while the other dispatcher directed officers and took care of the rest of the city's requests for service. The call was determined to be a kidnapping where the victim hid her phone and dialed 9-1-1 in hopes police would find her. • City wide threat to kill others and self at named locations - City buildings were locked down, an operation center was established for personnel and dispatch was vital in the coordination of events while still answering other calls for service. In 2016, the Investigations Bureau investigated: • 204 suspected child abuse reports • 92 missing person's cases • Conducted follow up on 212 cases that began at the patrol level and an additional 277 cases that were initi- ated by our investigators. • At any time the Investigations Bureau is typically working on an average of 35 cases. r t e The School Resource Officer (SRO) is assigned to the Investigations Bureau. This officer is responsible for providing services to all of the public schools within the San Luis Coastal Unified School District (SLCUSD). Unfortunately, in FY 2017-18 the SRO position will not be filled due to budget restraints and SLCUSD will no longer provide partial funding for the position. Property and Evidence Unit This unit provides safe and secure storage for a 11 items seized by Officers or turned in by the public. 1 The Property and Evidence Technician is responsi- ble for the preservation, destruction, and release of all items placed in the department's care, as well as providing all items of evidence to courts. .� The Evidence Technician processes evidence for `3 cases being investigated; this includes fingerprint processing, cyber crimes, crime scene investiga- tion, computer forensics, and more. Bomb threat on a City Bus: On January 6th, 2016, The San Luis Obispo and Cal Poly Police Departments worked together after a male boarded a City bus at the transit center located next to City Hall. The suspect announced to the other passengers on the bus, "I am passing out literature and talking about the possibility that there may be a bomb on one of the busses. This is not a joke so I would advise you not to ride the busses today or for the rest of the week until I am shown to be wrong. But I have reason to believe that this is the case. Thank you for your attention." As a result of the threat all of the City busses were stopped and searched for explosives. It was deter- mined there was no threat to the public safety and bus services were restored. At approximately 12:30 pm, Marcus Karr age 33 was located on the Cal Poly campus and identified as the person on the bus who made the bomb threat. The investigation revealed the threats were false and there was never a threat to public safety. W__ made on Facebook about shooting students at SLO High School: On February 26, 2016 the SLOPD School Resource Officer (SRO) was contacted by the Probation Department and given information regarding threatening statements and photos posted on Face - book. One of the photos depicted a male San Luis Obispo High School student dressed in a trench coat, holding what appeared to be a weapon similar to a Mac 10 machine gun and a handgun in his waistband. All the weapons pictured in the Facebook posts appeared to be real guns. After reviewing several concerning photos and written references on the student's Facebook page, the SRO worked with school administrators to find that the student who posted the images and was pictured holding the weapons was currently at school. Officers responded to the high school, and along with school administrators removed the student from his class and the campus. During the investigation the suspect admitted to posting the information seen by the SRO. A search of his residence revealed many of the weapons pictured were actually "Air Soft" guns, which are replica firearms that fire plastic BB's. In addition to the Air Soft guns several real guns were located and seized for safe keeping. The student was arrested for making Criminal Threats and taken to the Luis Obispo County Juvenile Services Center and booked into custody. Currently this is an ongoing rogation which may result in additional charges. Armed Robbery at Batch Ice Cream Shop: On November 9th, 2016 at approximately 6:25 pm, the San Luis Obispo Police Department received a 911 call reporting an armed robbery had just occurred inside the Batch Ice Cream Shop, located downtown. An unknown suspect entered the store and ordered food. He then produced a handgun, pointed it in the direction of the clerk and demanded the money from the cash register. After receiving an undis- closed amount of cash, the suspect demanded the clerk's cell phone and fled the business on foot. On November 22' , 2016, the Paso Robles Police Department experienced an armed robbery. The suspect in that robbery matched the description of the suspect as given by the clerk in the Batch rob- bery. A tip from a citizen to Crime Stoppers led investigators from both agencies to start investigati ng Ian Robbins as the suspect in both robberies. Based on that tip investigators were able to positively identify Robbins as the suspect who robbed Batch. He was arrested for robbery and use of a firearm Mile committing a robbery. Arson at San Luis Obispo High School: On December S, 2016 at 12:24 am, the SLOPD received a fire alarm activation on San Luis Obispo High School campus. The alarm was activated in a building which houses the school's Computer Lab and robotics team. Responding SLO Fire personnel found the Computer Lab fully involved in fire. The Fire Department was able to stop movement of the fire into additional buildings and saved the Com- puter Lab building. The contents of the Lab were a total loss. While Fire Department personnel were working to suppress the fire, the SLOPD Dispatch center re- ceived an additional call from an observant resident. That citizen wanted to report a suspicious vehi- cle with three occupants. According to the caller, the three men parked their car and jumped over a fence which led towards the fire scene. Police officers were sent to investigate and located Jacob Ruth, Michael Benadiba and Cameron Bratcher who were detained pending further investigation. As a result of the detention and subsequent investigation, the three men were arrested for Arson, Burglary and Vandalism. XPD Investigators were able to link these suspects to three additional burglaries, eight arson re- s, one fire alarm pull and two fire sprinkler activations. Investigators continue to actively investi - gate these additional crimes. At the conclusion of the investigation they will determine which of those cases will be appropriate to submit to the District Attorney's Office for criminal charges. Neighborhood & Community Outreach The Neighborhood Outreach Manager works with a local advertising agency to provide information and crime prevention materials to the community. Print media (posters and local newspaper ads) are utilized as well as www.resr)ect;io.com and the Police Department Neighborhood Outreach Facebook page and Instagram through sponsor ads. In 2016, the Neighborhood Outreach Manager and Chief Cantrell provided: • 18 SLO Days summer orientation ses- sions with students and supporters • Week of Welcome events (WOW leader orientation and the resource fair) • Student government meetings • Cuesta College new student orientation • Inter -Fraternal and PanHellenic Council meetings • Greek Summit and all -Greek risk manag- ers meetings • 19 neighborhood meetings • Coordinated bi-monthly Neighborhood Wellness meetings which then transi- tioned into the Neighborhood Forum. The Neighborhood Forum allows city staff to work closely with residents to communicate and collaborate to im- prove conditions within neighborhoods. • The Neighborhood Outreach Manager also participated in bi-annual neighbor- hood walks coordinated by Cal Poly to observe and discuss challenges in the neighborhoods. fl SLO Solutions The Neighborhood Outreach Manager helps with the referrals of residents to the SLO Solu- tions Conflict Resolution Program (a program of Creative Mediation, a local non-profit organi- zation.) This program offers mediation and conflict resolution service for San Luis Obispo residents at no charge. The types of disputes handled include landlord/tenant, roommates, student/non- student, and neighbor -to -neighbor issues. Per the SLO Solutions 2016 Annual Report • 1,214 residents received services through the program • Approximately 232 of those residents self -identified as Cal Poly students and 112 self -identified as Cuesta College students • SLO Solutions conducted 6 workshops and 11 discounted customized trainings that involved individuals from Cal Poly's orientation programs, Cuesta College Government/ Leadership, Cal Poly Graduate programs, several Cal Poly Departments, AmeriCorps VIP, Cuesta College staff, as well as a San Luis Obispo -based non-profit. Please visit their website at www,slosolui`ions.com for additional information on the programs and services offered. Fh l +dpp- { J `two . �` • ! rE e. w Enforcement Nigh,&w wn 5L❑ 3 Children's ay in the PIa _ ■ � lll�a I ��� � i � i�`r 8 � � � y .rpt ��s y • 016 City Christmas Parade .thief at Hawthorne EIE nentary � 1 I t i r waffetf r _ 1y1#sion a's House I z� sr of with RAMS (Retired Active Men's group) Smoke a staNation & check lb ! V. 40 { e ' ilk' Cub 5caut Visit to PD Parks & Rec Summer Cam k�" tir ; art fl .,,, jf Or k-1 �IAI Ib 11(-;%. 2016 Uniformed Crime Reporting (UCR) 62C 4 ■ 2G 5 r 2rIv All Crimes Against People 3 C 257 25C240 7%.., ► 2CC -- 20.5 15% 15 _ cc 5c C 2 014 1013 2p�; 14 Crimes Against. People ase i M =i5 14C 2r Z C+: Sc 6 4 25 " 32 38 44 20 _26 I � N -- � ` , C G v ■C Aggravated 000ery Rage Arter oted Kane Arson Hor ';cicle Assault 62C 4 ■ 2G 5 r 2rIv All Crimes Against People 3 C 257 25C240 7%.., ► 2CC -- 20.5 15% 15 _ cc 5c C 2 014 1013 2p�; 14 2016 Uniformed Crime Reporting (UCR) 12GG 1GC0 3 GG 5 GC 4 DO 2Gn 66 '6 9l. 0 I♦ Cc, mmerica i Burglary 25CO zeas 150'0' 1000 5ca 0 1-39 2014 Property Crime 679 443 298 14G 1619 JK ■ad Residertial T'left from BuralarV Ver; cle N 2('14 ■ 2G15 201,5 All Property Crime SIAIISiIC 1,058 1,357 8?4 71 98 95 =N ll Stolen 'Vehicle Theft 2075 1844 vp 12.5% 28% 20i5 2015 �IH!l�IIC�� Traffic Citations & Warnings o,CCC 5,630 5,750 T,9a9 �;Cr_.:G� 4,845 4s15 3 989 1GCC 3.CGC 2,CCC _,nC.0 C I I k I I I Traffic Citations j,'lJ a Y."i ingc ■ 201-4 r 210 15 a 2c15 Vehicle, Bicycle & Pedestrian Collisions 5 CC 544 5 495 5 CC -4 r_,C 3 CC 111 2,C ACL 59 5,1 54 F Mm w 3_ 3 jJ �m m �b e� Vcle CO S ons4S :e f 3i,1�i Qn; ✓Pdestr.dt1 C(7ijiSEo'1s 0 2C14 0 2C..5 0 23263 4CCC 35CO 3 GOO 2500 1500 IGOG 5 CO C 3.500 3,000 2,500 2.000 -OC i.cCO C 257 323 1=- = m W Drug Arrests 2,906. 2.598 2:ty1 Days Arrests 445 39a 426 ■ow OJ i Arrests ■ 2 2 0 • 0' != W 2C115 Downtown Cabs for Service % fgn %<gn s 0 ~flea" ■ 207:4 ■ 2C15 Y 20-1G 3„591 3,217 3,097 Total Arrests �.�a7i rl ImxIVrng `�©mee ess less 51/�11511�;; i 2..0 C C :,937 11,779 1,572 `,c001 r_. �4oise - Darty Calls for 5Pr'Jice Noise Related 549 448 4+2 '53 235 22 126 '37 MEN M M %Cis¢ Cita` ans Dis Jrbme!it _ari-;a�o rd ,_i� t atians Issied Advisory Cards Issued ■ 2CI4 ■ 2015 9 2015 To report a noise violation, call the San Luis Obispo Police non-eme�encu line at 805-781-7312. Noise Violations are enforced by the San Luis Obispo Police Department; the ordinance is enforced 24 hours a day and violators may receive a warning or a citation which carry fines. Want more information? See the City's Noise Standards. 51/-�I15IIC:� SLG Police Department Budget 2015-16 $949,012 ...M� • Staffing . %,On Staffing $13,968,291 Total Budget: $14,917,303 San Luis Obispo Police Department Programs: Administration Patrol Investigations Support Services (Dispatch and Records) Neighborhood Outreach & Education Traffic Safety JUINIAUi iNFURM/ San Luis Obispo Police Department 1042 Walnut Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Lobby Hours: Monday 12:00 pm to 4:45 prn Tuesday -Friday 10 arra to 4:45 pm Visit us at www.slocity.org/police The overarching vision for SLOPD is REDUCING HARM. We accomplish that by... 1. Reducing crime and the fear of crime — talk about • Data driven, predictive and intelligence led policing • Directed and proactive Problem oriented policing (top 20) • Preventative policing — 3E's, community assistance, youth outreach, partnerships, CPTED (crime prevention through environmental design) • Education about crime, social issues • Involvement in community programs (fear of us and fear of crime) • Visibility in our high crime, high traffic related areas (fear of crime) • Social media outreach ■ Use of technology (bait property, license plate readers, data, drone, cameras) • Focus on top offenders and locations • Training for our staff and recognition of efforts 2. Reduce collisions and increase multi modal safety • Engineering changes • Education (bike safety, cal poly education etc) • Enforcement (traffic stops, warning, citations, specialized targeted enforcement) • Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety (DDACTS) • High visibility traffic stops (agencies that have more traffic enforcement have lower crime — see handout) 3. Increase trust and community involvement/engagement ■ PEACE (Policing Education and Community Engagement) basically a citizen academy on the road • PACT (Police and Community Together) • Neighborhood Officers Program • Coffee with a Cop • Explorer program • Citizen academy — Some day • Community meetings • Attending schools and having positive contacts • Increasing neighborhood watch involvement • Social media outreach 4. Strengthen regional partnerships • Attendance at the Criminal Justice Administrators Association • HSOC/Hancock/YMCA/Leadership etc. • Regional SWAT and Bomb Task Force • Regional MFF training • Cal Poly relationships/education/training/committees • 2nd's meetings (Captains from all agencies) ■ Quarterly meetings (communications, investigations) • DA liaison meetings a Federal partnerships Attendance at multiple other agency committees and boards 5. Strengthen personnel resiliency and wellness • Peer team growth • Mindfulness training • Appropriate and applicable training for all personnel Chaplain program Better and increased communication about WHY we are doing what we are doing (lower stress) CIT training for all of Dept. Employee committee led by Captain Smith Crime 2015 to 2016 up 21 % Crime 2016 to 2017 up 11 % Crime 2016 to 2017 down 13% Here is just some of what has been accomplished in the last year toward each goal: Underlined denotes what has been done to reduce crime, nuisance, homeless — increase safety with no additional cost to operating budget AND increase efficiencies to reduce workload: YEAR 1 Noise lowest on record City Gate workload and staffing study started Cost sharing of media sonar with CP Video communication internally Coordinated for AmeriCor s volunteer to start volunteer prog ram Lifecycle list and tracking Start Increase social media presence Range upgrades BWC deployment — fully with policy revisions Policy revisions to immigration and pursuits IA PRO Mappinci of critical infrastructure Threat assessments and operations Plannina Sergeant and Lieutenant testing changes more applicable Communications Users Group Negotiated Command Trailer from AG Use of RICO funding from SLOSO Work with ASI on U hts Locks Life Law Forms Re ionat Mobil Field Force training Interview room upgrade Reduction of hiring time Range upgrades SLO Das education to all incoming Freshman and parents — s ecific to students Year 2 Cal Poly MOU for OT Sleeping room for officers Intern from CP for investigations Reduction of bomb TF payment to 0 Got 5k from ICAC for a new computer for Lehr Lexi of updates and DTBs started PACT CPTED PEACE Coffee with a COP Crime analvst Weapons trade in for officers to purchase sniper rifles .coined One Mind Pledge IAPro — cam faint rocess improved Team based schedules Concept plan started Use of Force reporting changes Crime reduction of 13% Start of cannabis regulation 800 hour OT reduction Train Dept on trans ender community Employee committee to improve morale PT evidence tech Chaplain policy updates Year 3 Analyst 40 hours New goals of Reducing Harm MH provider assigned to PD 69% of staff trained in CIT from 8 to 40 hours DT sergeant Criti-call use for communications Safe trade zone for Craigslist Naloxone Errs Communications consolidation SOW Records re-orq for evidence tech 20% concept plan completed for new building Teaching at Women Leaders in LE Article published about changing the narrative in Cal Chiefs magazine Cannabis regulations CAD reports Daily recap Boards/Committees CJAA Chair one year Hancock Academy Board YMCA Board — Youth safety committee HSCO Board Cal ID Board Cal Chiefs Changing the Narrative Committee Teach NWU — policies, executive image, contemporary policing, internal conflict IACP — Professional Standards, Ethics and Image Committee Serving on the IACP Policy revision for harassment and discrimination City Safety Committee CIP Committee FHRP Committee Specific to Cal Poly population/neighborhoods: Better screening at admissions — Cal Poly: I am aware that Admissions was managing the "overfill" from 2017/2018 by admitting less first year students to even out for 2018/2019 Education on dangers of large crowds — PD incorporates education on Unruly Gatherings into all student focused presentations including SLO Days, WOW leader training, IFC/PHA/USFC board meetings, Greek chapter meetings and ASI board meetings. In addition, I'm working on data compilation to show the estimated "attendance" at events where DACs/Cites are issued. More sophisticated social media monitoring — The company SLOPD, Geofeedia, was farming social media for data in a manner that was potentially infringing on privacy rights. The SM platforms discovered this and shut it down access and Geofeedia declared bankruptcy. However, PD continues to use social media to investigate and solve crimes. Lots of folks still don't make their information private thus allowing for open searches. Higher fines, double fines, longer fines — Safety Enhancement Zones are being used at Start of School, Halloween and St. Patrick's Day. PD brought forth an extension of St. Patrick's Day SEZ in 2017 and Council chose to not amend the code to extend. PD does extensive outreach to the community prior to the SEZ. Additional fines or extension of the zones is not currently under review. Serious academic consequences up to suspension and expulsion — Cal Poly Parental notification — Cal Poly, but FRPA applies. SLOPD — if the individual is 18+, they are a legal adult and information is not provided. r Immediately suspend or ban frats who allow illegal activities — Cal Poly. SLOPD provides information via summary request to Student Affairs for students who are arrested in San Luis Obispo and Student Affairs takes action. Since 2013, three fraternities have been disaffiliated from Cal Poly for illegal activity. Rental Inspection ordinance — adopted, repealed Landlord liability -- SLOPD continues to cite property owners for noise under 9.12.050. CDD continues property and building code enforcement as well, citing property owners when violations need correcting. Events and other alternatives to huge parties on the street, held on campus. — Cal Poly. My knowledge of this: ASI and Housing are consistently programming events to engage students on campus. Better monitoring and reporting of'possible illegal activity. Instill a sense ofpersonal responsibility for what happens on or near Cal Poly. — SLOPD is consistently doing proactive enforcement in the neighborhoods. Neighborhood Officers are also paying visits to properties who seemed more challenged with understanding noise and unruly gathering ordinances. Patrol shifts during SEZ are also increased with staff to better manage the party related behaviors. PD also is using some very direct personal safety messaging that essential tells students to take their safety seriously, My understanding is Cal Poly also uses Orientation programs and Housing staff to educate students on personal responsibility. Targeted patrolling by city and university police — Consistently happening by SLOPD. UPD continues to issue admin cites in the neighborhoods. Students themselves must own their actions — More diverse neighborhoods, including more owner -occupied and long -terra rentals — Housing: Major City Goal — Facilitate increased production of all housing types designed to be economically accessible to the area workforce and low and very low-income residents, through increased density and proximity to transportation corridors in alignment with the Climate Action Plan. More student housing on campus — Housing South project underway, additional housing locations identified in the CP Master Plan. Fraternities on campus — Cal Poly, discussion about that is occurring internally at the university related to their Master Plan. Safety Enhancement Zones — Start of School, Halloween & St. Patrick's Day: extensive outreach provided to the community in advance of the zones Additional Town -Gown Efforts Active members of SCLC Clean Up Week — PD does very focused efforts with Clean Up Week (moved to coincide with the last week of June when many student age residents move out of their rentals). The messaging includes: don't bum your couch with SLO Garbage Clean Up and also charities that will take donations. PD, PW, Util and SLO Garbage work collaboratively to get junk pulled of the street quickly. Orientation Programs — Cal Poly generously gives time to SLOPD, SLO Fire and Transit to talk to all new incoming students (freshman and transfers) and their parents/supporters. We work to pre -load students/families with information about living in San Luis Obispo, behavior expectations, safety and crime prevention. Transit provides students will great information about how to use the bus system. SNAP — parking enforcement, graffiti abatement, noise complaint response in the neighborhoods. SNAP works Monday through Saturday, all year long and is essential to helping patrol manage the lower level complaints so that patrol can be available for high level calls and/or proactive patrol. SNAP is also pro -active in reporting possible DUIs, public intox and unruly gatherings. Food Beverage Service Committee — Downtown SLO subcommittee comprised of owners/managers of downtown bars and restaurants. SLOPD attends their monthly meetings and provides information on nightlife impacts. The relationship with patrol and the bars is vey strong and positive. FBS provides the portable toilets during heavy party weekends which helps keep the streets cleaner. Most recently, PD asked the bar owners to consider eliminating the Thursday night 2 for 1 drink specials as the number of heavily intoxicate patrons spilling out into the street was becoming unmanageable. Bar owners were quick to agree to cease and comply. Property Management Communication — over this last academic year, I've been working on creating a comprehensive contact list of local Property Managers that I include in my SEZ and crime prevention communications. They are quick to pass along the information to their tenants and often reach out to me when they need assistance. SLO Solutions — This program continues to be an essential resource for this community. Often times, PD will receive complaints that are civil in nature and having SLO Solutions as a referral option is incredible. A lot of times, residents just need to talk out the conflict and SLO Solutions provides wonderful customer service and coaching to the folks that reach out. It's also great that Patrol is able to have the ability to make a referral other than Superior Court. Neighborhood Hub Newsletter — "quarterly" newsletter, compilation of information related to neighborhoods. Content is provided by Parking, Utilities, Transportation, Rangers, Biologist, Fire, Admin, Code Enf, CDD — neighborhood match grant, PD and often Cal Poly, Cuesta or a resident. While not exactly Town Gown specific, I try to include positive interactions with the students when I'm able. Other outreach non -infrastructure solutions including: ■ Reaching out to neighborhoods to introduce CPTED principles — improving sightlines/lighting • Looking for a grant or something for lighting — motion sensor — solar • Education through neighborhood HUB, and all SM platforms • Neighborhood Officers community meetings • SNAP in neighborhoods doing party patrol and parking enforcement — watching for issues Met with ASI recently and discussed our desire to meet regularly about issues on both fronts Education covers: o use of porch lights o traveling in groups o use of technology such as ULZI o Homeowners to improve sightlines — bushes/trees o Education on multi -modal safety o Neighborhood Officer Program o CPTED education to Association of Realtors (today actually) o Specific education to college students about personal safety (info graphic flyer attached) o Continued education to parents and incoming students via SLO Days o Education to Property managers — CPTED Coming: • Start of school traffic violation warning (currently developing the warning card, similar to an FI) • Presentation in July to the Downtown Association membership on using CPTED principles to strength safety in downtown business • Business Watch • Stay alert and aware of your surroundings. • Trust your instincts. If it doesn't look or feel right, it might not be. • Lock your door. cvcn when you are home • Drop shades and pull curtains at night so people cannot see in. • Never leave a drink unattended, know what you're drinking. and never accept drinks from people you don't know or trust • Mobile phones are awesome. and distracting. Keep your eyes and cars open, and your hands free. • Avoid alleys, shortcuts and deserted areas. • Walk with a friend whenever possible. • Keep port h lights on or use motion lights to i Iltirninate your residence Be Proactive. Protect your nei0hbo1-h0r;-±. NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH �Tii :.ri ..iuio 1 1 � We report all Suspicious Persons $ Activities to our ` Low Enforcement Agency Did you know SLOPD officers are assigned to your neighborhood? You can contact your Neighborhooj Officer directly by vrsitinq www.slopd.org, Neighborhood Officers can help vvith ongoing neighborhood concerns and share 'important neighborhood crimp prevention information. N—Pi(,H`'0RH0CkD -WATCH Interested in starting. a 4C) Neighborhood Watch in your are V Contact SLOPD Neighborhood Outreach at (805)781-7186 Lock it or lose it, Small actions prevent big losses. V 'rf-10 QL]rnber of thetf-I from VeIlick's in San, Luj��, Obispc� lha.-, 'been rising s c nif iy intiv. -6-v- leavinAAW car -or belon�incs inside and visible, VOU'rc o,plpor(1_04f Call 9-1-1 for ernergencies, and (805) 781-7312 for non emerciency assistance. LOCK Your cat- and home DO NOT leave valuables <09> in plain sight PARK Your vehicle in well -lit areas BE AWARE of suspicious activity and report it to ■ the police Call 9-1-1 for ernergencies, and (805) 781-7312 for non emerciency assistance. ASSOQA TED STUDEN rS. ;NC, asi L ot% C Kw LIGHTS, LfFE, r,. There has been a HUGE increase in theft in the City of San Luis Obispo to date. n a mock your doors and your belongings. Leave light-- on at hcrne tc d,cruade potential burglars. Take easy steps to avoid crimes of opportunity and to make sure you and your possessions are safe. 14CAL POLY SIS P� ° v"An FTI Pon ° f O in Du FROM: Deanna Cantrell, Police Chief Prepared By: Jeff Smith, Police Captain SUBJECT: POLICE DEPARTMENT 2016/2017 COMPARISON AND UPDATE RECOMMENDATION Review and file. REPORT -IN -BRIEF On April 3', a presentation will be made to the City Council regarding Police Department updates for 2017. This update will provide Council with information regarding community outreach, crime, police operations, homelessness, traffic, noise and downtown. DISCUSSION Community Outreach: Policing has grown significantly more challenging with increases in crime in much of California, tightening budgets, rapidly evolving technology, and decreasing trust in law enforcement nationally. The San Luis Obispo Police Department (SLOPD) knows we must partner with the community to resolve those challenges. We cannot reduce crime without a strong relationship with our community who are willing to support our efforts and help us prevent crime by reporting and engaging in neighborhood wellness. We cannot repair our damaged relationships without a community that is willing to engage openly and honestly in the process. We are incredibly fortunate to have a community in San Luis Obispo that understands this and whole-heartedly partners with us in this effort. Our goals are to reduce harm. We reduce harm by reducing crime and victimization, reducing traffic collisions and increasing multi -modal safety, strengthening our regional partnerships, strengthening the health and well-being of our employees, and strengthening our relationship with the community we serve. To meet our goal of reducing harm by strengthening our community/police relationship, we started the PACT (Police and Community Together) in January 2017. PACT represents a committed and diverse group of community members/advocates that partner with law enforcement to affect positive social change through dialogue, education and understanding. Currently, PACT has representation from major groups representing the Jewish, Black, Latino, Muslim, LGBTQ, Interfaith, Student and Homeless/Mentally Ill communities. The police department has officers that serve as liaisons to each of these groups, then report back monthly to each other about what each group is working on. The liaisons connect with and learn about their respective communities, then serve as a conduit between the police department and the community. Additionally, the community works with law enforcement to develop training that is important for law enforcement to experience, and we in turn, educate them about policing. Also, in January 2017 the SLOPD launched a community program called PEACE (Policing Education And Community Engagement). PEACE is fashioned after a citizen police academy and is designed to engage the community in learning more about policing practices, policies and what it takes to police a community. In 2017 four (4) PEACE presentations were provided at the Copeland Health Education Pavilion, located at French Hospital. The presentation topics included Policing a Community, Use of Force, Body Worn Cameras, and Mental Health: Police and Community Resources. In 2018, officers from SLOPD participated in several community forums to address concerns surrounding immigration legislation and impacts within our community. Our goal during these forums was to educate the public on current state and federal laws and to emphasize the importance of providing service fairly and impartially to all individuals who reside within our city, despite immigration status. Coffee with a Cop was also launched in 2017. This program gives citizens the opportunity to speak with officers in a casual setting with no agendas, speeches or distractions. In addition to Coffee with a COP we also increased our Social Media presence by starting Twitter and growing our Facebook presence. Lastly, police officers assigned to neighborhoods continued to attend neighborhood outreach meetings to discuss current issues and neighborhood safety. Of course, outreach that was already in place, such as the neighborhood officer program, neighborhood outreach and civility effort and Cal Poly partnerships, have and will continue to grow. Crime: Overall, SLOPD has had significant success with intelligence led policing efforts. The City of San Luis Obispo experienced an unprecedented increase in crime since 2015 (21 % from 2414 to 2015), and that trend continued in 2016 (11% from 2015 to 2016). To effectively and efficiently reverse the trend, the SLOPD hired a part time Public Safety Analyst. She has focused on high -crime places and high -rate offenders to effectively reduce crime in the community. The application of data -driven strategies, such as hotspot policing, problem -oriented policing, and intelligence -led policing, work as we have witnessed in 2017. The analyst helps SLOPD to understand when, where, and how to focus limited resources, as well as how to evaluate the effectiveness of our strategies. Sound public safety analysis is paramount to our success. By the end of 2017, SLD realized a 2% decrease in violent crime and a 14% decrease in property crime, with a 13% decrease overall. Throughout 2017, SLOPD continued to receive complaints regarding adverse homeless behavior in the downtown. Many of these behaviors can be attributed to substance abuse, mental illness or a combination of both. Early in the year, SLOPD began working with County Mental Health to add a full time mental health specialist to the Community Action Team (CAT). In 2018, the position was approved, and Transitions Mental Health Association (TMHA) was awarded the contract. Currently SLOPD is working with TMHA to fill the position, with a goal to have a civilian mental health profession in place in April, of 2018. We are very excited to add the mental health position to our CAT team and believe it will greatly assist our agency in addressing some of the needs within our community. At the conclusion of 2017, SLO downtown had a 3% increase over 2016 in calls for service and a 1% decrease in officer - initiated activity downtown_ It should be noted SLOPD had several unexpected vacancies in 2017 due to retirements, resignations, and, injuries. At the end of 2017, SLOPD had 5 vacant positions which were briefly held because of Financial Health Response Planning. These positions are currently being filled and recruitment efforts continue. The vacant positions workload was absorbed through the temporary reassignment of officers in special assignments. Positions that were reassigned to patrol in 2017 (either for the full year or partially), included the Narcotics Task Force, Special Enforcement Team, Downtown Bikes, Traffic, and Community Action Team_ Unfortunately, the temporary reassignment of these positions had negative impacts in their respective assignments in the loss of proactive policing and community engagement. Currently we are operating with one new officer in training, three cadets in the academy, one sworn vacancy, one sworn long term worker's comp officer on leave, and two communications vacancies. Given all the shortages, even with personnel moves, we have still been operating short in patrol staffing. However, those shortages are filled through overtime when necessary, as to not operate below minimums. Minimum staffing is monitored based on Ctiygate and the International Association of Chiefs of police recommendations regarding ideal police departments patrol officers having 33% of their time available for proactive policing. Hiring, for all agencies has reached a critical level. Like many law enforcement agencies, we are having difficulty recruiting lateral employees. Hiring/retention continues to be a major challenge for both sworn officers and civilian communications personnel. In 2017 and continuing in 2018 SLOPD has focused some of our recruiting efforts on hiring police cadets. This is an opportunity for a police agency, and city, to invest in an individual who has an interest in a career in law enforcement but has not spent time at a prior police agency. Typically, these candidates are local residents or even current employees, that are invested in the community. Homicide Rape Robbery Agg. Assa ut Violent Crime 2016 2017 1st Half 0 0 19 is 78 m PART 1 CRIMES change 0% -21% -22% -21% Total 1st Half 106 84 -2IgG 2nd Half % change Homicide 0 0 0% Rape 19 24 Robbery 12 16 Agg. Assaut 40 49 Total 2nd Half 71 89 Total Year Violent 177 1 173 Total Part 1 Crime 2253 1955 -13y Property Crime 2016 2017 1st Half % change Commercial Burglary 39 32 -3$% Residential Burglary 82 49 -40% Theft from Vehicle 366 340 -7% Stolen Vehicle 51 35 -31% General Theft 549 478 ALA Total 1st Half 1087 2nd Half %c rrtge Commercial Burglary 52 37 -, Residential Burglary 78 54 34% Theft from Vehicle 307 226 Stolen Vehicle 44 59 General Theft 508 472 -7% Total 2nd Half 989 848 -14% Total Year Property 2076 1782 -14% Police Operations: Records: In the Records Division the number of reports processed went from 8,908 in 2016 to 8,073 in 2017 (10% decrease). The number of citations processed by Records had a slight increased from 7,049 in 2016 to 7,084 in 2017 (.5% increase). Records had increases in walk in reports, phone calls received, public records requests and other areas. Prope In the Property Division the number of Evidence Items booked in went from 7,542 in 2016 to 7,801 in 2017 (3% increase). Discovery Orders processed also increased from 716 in 2016 to 816 in 2017 (14% increase). As part of this increase there has been a significant increase for video evidence. This evidence takes a great deal of time to produce. WatchGuard video recorded went from 25,081 in 2016 to 62,815 in 2017 (150% increase). WatchGuard Video/Cases booked in as evidence went from 590 in 2016 to 1,043 in 2017 (77% increase). The numbers are by case number, not by the number of videos in each case, which can be upwards of 10-15 videos per case. To help offset this increase SLOPD hired a part time property clerk in 2017. The property workload has continued to see an increase, therefore, we have been working to establish a full time second position to help control the increase demand on property. Dispatch: In the Communications Center we saw an increase regarding the number of calls into the center. The number of calls increased by almost 8% in 2017, from 94,771 in 2016 to 101,917 in 2017. Calls for service increased in 2017 from 32,738 in 2016 to 39,514 in 2016 (1 % increase). Through much of 2017 dispatch operated with 2 to 3 vacancies. To keep dispatch fully staffed, these vacancies were primarily filled through overtime. Investigations: In the Investigations Bureau the number of cases assigned for follow up by an Investigator went from 313 in 2016 to 335 in 2017 (7% increase). Homelessness: The department's bicycle officers have continued to educate downtown businesses regarding trespassing laws and have encouraged them to complete trespassing letters. These letters allow the police department to take immediate action to mitigate trespassing problems at these locations with the owner's approval. Every six months these letters are reviewed to ensure the police department has all the current information to meet the DA's office expectation for compliance. This past year the police department responded to numerous complaints regarding the increase transient occupancy in the Mission Amphitheater. The Downtown Bike team worked with the Mission to address transient related issues within Mission Plaza and on Mission grounds. Downtown Bikes, along with patrol, increased their presence throughout the day and during the night to enforce violations committed in their presence. The challenge law enforcement often faces is when there is no law or city code violation being committed. Being homeless or being in a group of transients in a space open to the public is not a crime. We have continued to educate and encourage the public and business owners to contact the police department when they observe violations being committed. In evaluating calls for service pertaining to the homeless population during 2017 (to include contacts as suspects, victims or witnesses) these contacts increased by 785 for a total increase of 12% compared to 2016. In 2017 the police departments overall calls for service increased by a total of 1 %. Homeless related calls for service accounted for 19% of all calls for service citywide compared to 17% last year. Some of the challenges the department faced this past year was shortages in patrol, which had an impact on our downtown bike team and CAT. For much of the year CAT has only been able to have one CAT officer and the downtown bike team has operated with only one bike officer during the day. This has limited some the effectiveness these teams can have on many of the crimes and negative transient impacts within our downtown. Traffic: Vehicle collisions have increased 8%, with a 12% increase in pedestrian involved collisions, but a decrease of 28% in collisions involving bicycles. This decrease can be credited to an increase in public outreach and education on bicycle safety. The traffic team also conducted special enforcement related to primary collision factors in bicycle collisions. In 2017 SLOPD received a Homeless CFS vs. Total CFS 35000 32,738 33,106 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 6285 7102 5000 0 0 2016 2017 HHomeless CFS STotal CFS Traffic: Vehicle collisions have increased 8%, with a 12% increase in pedestrian involved collisions, but a decrease of 28% in collisions involving bicycles. This decrease can be credited to an increase in public outreach and education on bicycle safety. The traffic team also conducted special enforcement related to primary collision factors in bicycle collisions. In 2017 SLOPD received a grant through the Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) which funded 8 special enforcements to address 1 bicycle violations and 3 two-hour presentation on bicycle safety. Traffic and patrol continue to collaborate with Public Works as we examine collision prone locations in our City to provide education, enforcement and engineering efforts. In 2017 there was an 5% increase in traffic citations issued and a 14% decrease in warnings. In 2017 there were 8671 traffic stops completed, compared to 2016 there were 11,705 a 26% decrease. DUI arrests from 2016 to 2017 decreased by 15%, which can be attributed to the loss of our DUI grant position. DUPs will continue to be a priority for our officers, especially with the legalization of Cannabis. DUI Arrests 440 426 420 400 380 364 360 340 320 300 DUI Arrests ■ 2016 ■ 2017 Noise: Party related noise complaints decreased by 6% in 2017. This decrease marks an all-time low in party related noise complaints since tracking began in 1998. This decrease is attributed to a variety of efforts made by the police department and building upon past initiatives and campus partnerships. Police department staff continued to participate in summer orientation assemblies for over 4,500 incoming Cal Poly Freshmen and parents. These presentations provide staff with the opportunity to "front load" incoming students and their supporters with information on living in SLO, city laws that are important to know and how to stay safe. Neighborhood officers continue to be engaged in community outreach, providing education at neighborhood meetings and conducting problem oriented policing at locations before calls for service are generated. Neighborhood officers also visit properties that have had multiple noise violations to help educate residents and encourage wise social event planning. The pilot party registration program which launched in May 2017 has also been a great option for residents. Over 40 parties have been registered since the start of the program; only three events have received warning phone calls and no citations have been issued. A wide variety of messaging methods are used by the police department to reach residents: social media ads, doorhangers, posters/flyers, e -blasts, in- person presentations, media releases and participation in the Student Community Liaison Committee. Lastly, the partnerships with Cal Poly and Cuesta College continue to provide many more opportunities for the noise and neighborhood wellness messaging. Information shared is dispersed through many different avenues: student government, housing, Greek life, athletics, clubs and Off -Campus Programs. In addition, Off -Campus Programs at Cal Poly continues to provide the Educated Renter Certificate Program which teaches students who are about to transition to off -campus living situations the ins -and -outs of how to successfully reside in the neighborhoods. Cal Poly continues to hold students accountable for off campus behavior. Nose Calls 161'0 1572 1483 L400 1200 1000 300 697 655 500 472 456 IW 223 209 200 ■ 0 11 0 11 11 Crs,Cs�ite.s Neg Violation NSPY ■ 2016 0 2017 Unable to Locate (UTL) noise violations continued to decrease in 2017. SLOPD saw a 13% decrease which is most likely due to the comprehensive education and outreach taking place throughout the year. Callers are doing a better job defining locations of violations and officers are more acutely aware of the need to search and locate properties that are in violation of the noise ordinance. Downtown; Downtown calls for service for daytime activity increased by 2% and nighttime activity increased by 3%. As previously mentioned, we operated with several shortages in specialty units throughout the year. Not being able to operate fully staffed throughout the year was a contributing factor to the increase calls for service and the below decrease in officer initiated activity. Downtown will continue to be a priority for Bicycle officers CAT and all of patrol. In 2017 the department saw a 11 % decrease in officer initiated calls in the downtown. Downtown officers have been utilizing crime prevention through environmental design techniques while partnering with Public Works and local businesses to improve conditions such as lighting, landscape, building maintenance, fencing, programming and traffic flow. By addressing some of these issues the city and local businesses can deter criminal activity. Currently there are five public cameras placed in the downtown core. Two cameras monitor the GIobe and Mission area and the other three monitor the central core of downtown on Higuera. Conclusion: Our efforts are shown positively in many areas as demonstrated by the information above. Crime will continue to be a major priority for SLOPD. After significant increases in crime in 2015, and the implementation of numerous crime reduction initiative and community programs, San Luis Obispo has seen a 2% decrease in Part d crime over the last 2 years. The department's efforts in intelligence led policing has played a significant role in the 14% decrease in property related crimes. Property crime continues to be a significant issue within the city, and throughout the state. Theft from unsecured vehicles continues to be the number one issue for vehicle burglaries and we have seen an increase in the number of bicycles being stolen. Continued education has helped with decreasing the trend, which we will continue throughout 2018. These measures will include directed patrols targeted at problem locations, utilization of stings and undercover operations to catch criminals engaged in or looking for crimes of opportunity and using print media, social media and community meetings to educate our citizens to reduce victimization and increase awareness. CONCURRENCES Review and file. FISCAL IMPACT None. CIT`' OI• SAN LUIS OBISPO NEIGHBORHOOD Summer 2018 if U Neighborhood Street Projects Underway Construction will begin this summer on a roadway sealing project of streets within the southeast neighborhoods of the City. Striping enhancements often accompany resealing projects as a cast -effective way to implement planned striping projects. Laurel Lane in particular will receive major complete street enhancements along the corridor, reducing the travel lanes to one in each direction with a two-way center turn lane. This allows for buffers to be added between the bicycle and motor vehicle lane as well as the addition of approximately 30 on -street parking spaces. Additionally, the intersections of Laurel at Southwood and Laurel at Augusta will include construction of bulbouts, increasing the sidewalk area and decreasing the pedestrian crossing distance. Other intersection enhancements at these two intersections will include high visibility crosswalks and enhanced stop signage. Laurel Lane was previously identified in the 2415 traffic Safety Report as having the highest ranked intersection location for pedestrian collisions in the City. Complete street elements were identified for this street and developed over the past year after several neighborhood and advisory body meetings. This project will be complete before the end of the year. PROJECT LOCATIONS PAVING AREA 2 PAVING AREA 3 s City Shines Light on New Street light Program Until recently, San Luis Obispo has not had a formal program or funding to respond to public requests for new street lighting. In the 2017-19 Financial Plan, the City Council authorized the creation of a New Street Light Program and with annual funding of $20,000. As part of the 2018-19 Adopted Budget, the City Council added $30,000, bringing the total available to $50,000 to install new street lights. Two locations in the neighborhoods near the Cal Poly campus have been identified and are currently in design. Installation will occur by the beginning of 2019. This program supports the City's Major City Goal to increase multimodal transportation and is also a Measure G Priority supporting public safety. If you have concerns about street lighting in your neighborhood, whether it be the lack of lighting or vegetation such as trees, blocking the existing street light, contactjennifer Rice of the Transportation Division via email jrice@slocity.org. Neighborhood Match Grants - Building a Better Community On May 2nd, 2018, the Human Relations Commission (HRC) awarded the Laguna Lake Neighbors, Vista del Lago/Laguna Lane Neighbors, and the Islay Park Neighbors matching grants to help improve their surrounding neigh borlioods. These projects include summer social gatherings, trail clean-up, and park clean-up activities. Your neighborhood could be next! Applications for the 4th year of Neighborhood Matching Grants will be available on the City Website on September 1st, 2018. Join us for an informational meeting regarding the Grant program on Thursday, September 13th, from 5:30 — 6:30 p.m. in the Council Hearing Room of City Hall at 990 Palm Street. Please note that all applicants are required to discuss their projects with staff before submittal. Contact As- sistant Planner Cara Vereschagin at (805) 781-7596 or cvereschagin@slocity,org with any questions. "Brunch by the Lake", a social yoga activity was organized by the Laguna Lake Neighbors, Wildfire Threats, Our Current Reality Earlier this year, an independent state oversight agency created in 1962, the Little Hoover Commission, published a report that is truly a must -read for every Californian. Respectfully, I ask that you pause right now, perform a Google -search for "Little Hoover Commission forest management" and read the executive summary. It's a quick read found on pages 6-9 of the report... IT wait right here for you... Welcome back. Likely the executive summary put facts and figures behind the realities you've been witnessing in the news. Per- haps the most ominous statement in the report is the following: "decisions made during the next five to 10 years will determine the forests' condition in 100 to 200 years." Due to geography and environmental realities, I would offer this one revision to that statement: "decisions made during the next five to 10 years will determine the California's condition in 100 to 200 years." Our forests are our lungs, and their health determines how effectively we capture water, which is the lifeblood of Californians and California's economy. We can't survive without our lungs and blood. This isn't a forest problem. This is problem for ail Califor- nians. Many of the critical decisions to address this problem need to be made in Sacramento and Washington D.C., but some of the most beneficially impactful decisions are made in communities, neighborhood, and individual homes. With 129 million dead trees in California, the majority of which are on federal lands, it would be comforting to see a massive partnership between Sacramento and Washington to remediate this dire situation before more homes and lives are lost, but so far that has not been the case. So what can you do? Visit the Fire Department's information on preparedness, and make a decision to embrace the tenants of the "Ready, Set, Go!" program. You can do so much to ensure thatyou are ready and thatyou've addressed your property's risks in a manner that helps us save your home in the event of a wildfire. Here is one super important fact: embers from a wildfire will travel over one mile carrying with them enough energy to start a fire far from the embers point of origin. This is not simply an issue for those homeowners who live immediately adjacent to Open Space. This is an issue for all residents of San Luis Obispo. If you look at a map of the recent fires that devastated Santa Rosa, you will see the loss of neighborhoods with many of the same characteristics of neighborhoods in the core of San Luis Obispo. If you follow the Fire Department on Twitter (@SLO_0ty_Fire), you'll not only see our response information, but you will also be alerted to future public meetings to discuss fire prevention_ At our last oubllc meeting, despite media releases to encouirage par_ ocipation, we only had one member of the public attend. We look forward to partnering with a larger segment of our community to create the greatest opportunity for synergy at the local level. --Garret 0lson, Fire Chief Lock It or lose It, Seriously Property crime is on the rise in the neighborhoods of San Luis Obispo. Between January and June, there has been a 77% increase in residential a burglaries. 50% of the burglaries have occurred through unlocked doors (front of back) and an additional 10% have been via unlocked garage doors, Additionally, 123 bicycle thefts have been reported (Jan. -June). While San Luis Obispo is overall a very sale community, this increase in property crime is unsettling. SLOPD has been very successful in finding perpetrators of these crimes; however, many of the burglaries could have been prevented. SLOPD asks that residents assist with preventing burglaries and thefts by using these sim pie and effective tips: 1. Lock the doors of your home, even when you are home. 2. Secure all windows. During the summer, consider using win dow locks even if fans are place in window frames to make it difficult to remove the fan. 3. Security cameras - low cost options are available at local retailers and they are often a deterrent to thefts. 4. Consider having packages shipped to your workplace instead of your front porch if you are not there to receive it. 5. Lighting - porch lights, motion lights, and path lights are are recommended to help illuminate your property at night. 6. Landscape maintenance - use the "2 foot, 6 foot" rule with residential landscape. Keep shrubs and bushes trimmed down to 2 feet high and tree canopies trimmed up to 6 feet high. 7. Lockyour vehicle and remove all valuables, 8. If leaving for vacation, let your neighbors know and ask that they keep an eye on your house. 9. Report suspicious activity immediately to SLOPD 805-781-7312. 10. If you return to your home and find an intruder, call 9-1-1. SLOPD can assist with the creation of Neighborhood Watch groups in the neighborhoods, Contact Christine Wallace at 805-781-7186 or cwallace@slocity.org if interested in hosting a neighborhood crime prevention meeting. Residential Parking Districts Expansions & Additions The City continues to receive requests from residents that are interested in establishing residential parking permit districts (RPPD) in their neighborhood. Below is a list of RPPD requests throughout the City and the status of the requests as of July 19, 2018. • Park View District Expansion- Approved by City Council on February 20th, Expansion area will take effect fall 2018. • Monterey Heights District Expansion -The proposed expansion did not get enough support from residents for a recommendation to be made to Council. • E/Capiton Way District - The proposed district did not get enough support from residents for a recommenda tion to be made to City Council, • Ferrini 2trict Expansion- Approved by City Council on July 10th. Expansion area will take effect fall 2018. • Anhoim DlStrict(New District) -Approved by City Council on July 17th. Expansion area will take effect fall 2018. • Dana Street District- City parking staff is working with residents to begin the process. No timeline has been established yet for this request. For those residents that live in existing RPPDs, letters will be mailed to property owners letting them know that their current permits will be expiring and how they can obtain permits for the upcoming year. Permits cost $15 each and there is a limit of 2 permits per household. If you live or have rentals in a Residential Parking Permit District, don't forget your permits! Recycling Pilot Project in City Parks Noticed the new blue recycling bins that have taken post at local parks? In collaboration with the Parks Department, the Utilities Department is launching a pilot recycling project to examine effectiveness of recycling in public spaces. This pilot study is starting with the public parks surrounding Laguna Lake! The greatest hurdle in organizing a successful recy- cling program in SLO has historically been contami- nation of recycling bins with non -recyclable items. In order to monitor contamination, and track feasibility of a large-scale implementation of recycling within City parks, a few times each month the members of our team will audityour new park recycling bins for contamination. If clean recycling bins can be main- tained, the program should be a success, but support is needed from the community in doing so. While the intent to recycle is always positive, it is important to remain educated on what is actually re- cyclable in San Luis Obispo. To guide clean recycling, the Integrated Waste Management Authority (IWMA) has published a verified list of what is accepted by aur recycling facili[y. Included in this list are also items that should not enter the recycling bins, Con- taminants commonly found in recycling bins, especially in bins within pubic spaces, include leftover food, food -contaminated pa- per products, liquids, plastic/wax lined coffee cups and even pet waste. Each of these items alone is enough to contaminate an entire bin of recycling. Fortunately, there are easy ways to avoid contamination of public recycling bins using this train of thought: 1) When in doubt, double check! Utilize the recycling list provided by the IWMA at www.IWMA.org or the City website at www,slocity.org/recycling. 27 Always throw biologically contaminated products in the TRASH, Think food -contaminated paper plates and mutt -mitt bags, 37Remind visitors and friends of City standards. By keeping the bins clean and sharing knowledge of local recycling standards with others, a success ful recycling program can be created throughout the entire City. ,ontamination prevention starts at the bin. For more information :ontact SLO Utilities at RecycleRight@slocity.org. Thanks forrecyclirg! Progress Made on Major City Goals & Important Objectives 7) MCG. Housing - 44% Complete Facilitate increased production of all housing types designed to be economically accessible to the area workforce and low and very low-income residents, through increased density and proximity to transportation corridors in alignment with the Climate Action Plan. • Over 10 affordability agreements are in process. • Affordable Housing Fund balance is $1.75M. • Zoning Regulation Update added workforce housing as an income category. Z) MCG: Multi -Modal Transportation - 401/o Complete Prioritize implementation of the Bicycle Master Plan, pedestrian safety, and the Short -Range Transit Plan. Calle)oaquin Park and Ride lot opened — the first in SLO. SLO Transit received multiple awards and continued to adjust services. Signal upgrade at Monterey and Osos complete increasing safety. 3) MCG: Climate Action - 40% Complete Cost-effective measures, including implementation of a Sustainability Coordinator and formation of a Green Team. • Sustainability Manager Hired and Green Team re-established • Climate Action Plan Update is underway. • Implementation of plastic bottles and straw regulations • Community Choice Energy (CCE) Program underway 4) MCG: Fiscal Sustainability & Responsibility - 50% Complete Continue to implement the City's Fiscal Responsibility Philosophy with a focus on economic development and responsiveness, structurally balanced fiscal outlook, unfunded liabilities, and infrastructure financing. • Adopted the Fiscal Health Response Plan to address unfunded liabilities. • Funding the Future of SLO. • Continued work on economic impacts of Diablo Canyon closure. 5) 010: Downtown Vitality - 50% Complete Continue to improve safety, infrastructure investment, and maintenance in the Downtown and support the Downtown Associa- tion's proposal to consider a Downtown Improvement District. • Ongoing maintenance in the downtown core with portions of the Mission Plaza Concept Plan to start during Summer of 2018. • The Community Action Team and Bicycle Patrols continue to maintain public safety in downtown. ITGA 201$ - Columbus. Ohio Cal Poly, Cuesta College and the City of San Luis Obispo are members of the International Town Gown Association (ITGA), ITGA"s mission, "...strengthens town/gown partner- ships by providing a network of professionals and resources, identifying and sharing promising practices, innovative solutions and professional development opportunities for municipal and university communities." ITGA holds an annual conference, this year held in Colum- bus, Ohio. The conference provides attendees with three days of education sessions on a variety of topics from plan- ning and zoning to public-private partnerships to enforce- ment and education, This year, Cal Poly Director of Commu- nity Relations Courtney Kienow and SLOPD Neighborhood Outreach Manager Christine Wallace presented a session at the conference. The session "Civility Report Results: Collab- oration Leads to Measurable Success" was a recap of the efforts that have been made since the inception of the Neighborhood Wellness Community Civility Working Group in 2013. (For full details of the working group, visit the City website.) Highlights of the collaborative work done by Cuesta, Cal Poly and the City were provided including the addition of the Start of School Safety Enhancement Zone, Cal Poly PD and SLOPD MOU, on -campus education and accountability for off -campus misconduct, and property maintenance enforcement and education. Also in attendance was Off -Campus Programs Coordinator Matthew Armas. Cuesta, Cal Poly and City staff have attended the conference several years running and it continues to be an excellent resource for information and networking. For additional information on ITGA, visit their website at www,itga.org. SLO Days - New Students Get the Lowdown on SLD Cal Poly New Student Programs produces an outstanding comprehesive orientation program for Incoming students and their parents/supporters each summer called SLO Days, Over a two day period, students attend a variety of sessions and their sup- porters attend similar sessions concurrently, Approximately 4000 students and their supporters will attend a SLO Days orienta- tion this summer. Several years ago, Cal Poly graciously offered session space to San Luis Obispo Police and Fire Departments. The sessions, in partner- ship with Cal Poly Police Department and SLO Transit, cover information students and their families need to know aboutjoining the San Luis Obispo community including: municipal and penal codes most frequently enforced with student age residents, property main- tenance expectations, partnerships between the agencies, reminders to lock up literally everything, and reminders on now to be safe and take personal safety seriously. information For all agencies and invitations to reach out with questions or concer grams for providing tiJe tune to off -campus agencies to help educate new students. Also included in the presentations are contact ns. Special thanks to Cal Poly Orientation Pro- New Neighborhood Park Approved By Council At a recent City Council meeting held on June 19, 2018, the Council approved the adoption of the 2018-19 Supplemental Budget that included general fund budget to design and construct a park at 533 Broad Street, currently the location of the City's Broad Street Community Garden, No timeline has been set for the design and construction of the park. Parks and Recreation staff will be engaging with the neigh- bors in the North Broad area and community garden members for input during the design of the park. Additional information will be discussed at future Parks and Recreation Commission meetings; dates and topics will be shared with the Broad Street neighborhood and community garden members to attend the public meetings to provide public opinion. For additional infor- mation, contact Lindsey Stephenson, Recreation Manager at 805-781-7070 or Istephenson@slocity.org, Eine Structured Amended for Code Enforcement The San Luis Obispo City Council approved the amending of chapter 1.24 (Administrative Code Enforcement Procedures of the municipal code on June 5, 2018. This amendment includes assessing a late fee on delinquent citations, citing repeat violations over multiple properties at higher fines and recording Notice of Violation on property title. In addition, the Code Enforcement administrative citations for 2nd and 3rd fines have increased from $200 to $500 and $500 to $1000.00.s The increase is only applicable to Code Enforcement (i.e. substandard haus- 4t) Q s ing, unpermitted construction, use permit violations). u 'L e � p � To submit a field investigation request for a suspected violation, the report- Z �` ing party can call the hotline at (805) 594-8188, email code@slocity.org, or fill out the form on the website.rAu1 Fa1o�g N1E�s IMP00r L I 0MP 5 c1E Good Neighbor Day - September 29, 2018 Cal Poly Off -Campus Programs continues to serve the San Luis Obispo community by celebrating and participating in Good Neighbor Day on Saturday, September 29, 2018 from 10am —12pm, This special day is a wonderful opportunity for students, families, and community members to celebrate each other and the beautiful location we are lucky to call home — San Luis Obispo! !n partnership with SLO City and SLO Police Department, we will be leading a neighborhood cleanup filled with treats, celebration, and more! Come meet your new neighbors, share stories, and help keep San Luis Obispo one of the happiest cities in America. There will be two meeting locations to sign up for: Santa Rosa Park and Throop Park. Don't forget to bring your walking shoes and your neighbor! For more information or to RSVP, please contact Off -Campus Programs at offcampusprograms@calpoly.edu or 805.756.5841. We hope to see you there! Members of Cal Poly Greek Life picked up trash throughout the Foothill neighborhoods. Trash was also collected in the Alta Vista and Monterey Heights neighborhoods. Trails & Open Space The Ranger Service program works to provide both educational and recreational opportunities to the community of San Luis 1 Obispo, The City's 7,000 acres of designated open space promise to have something for everyone including rugged hiking trails, challenging mountain biking and leisurely scenic pathwaysjust minutes from downtown. Ranger L ed Hikes The Ranger service offers monthly interperetive hikes in City owned open space. Cal Poly Profes- sors often join to share their knowledge on topics including local flora and fauna, geology, history of open spaces, and more. Ranger led hikes are a great way to get comfortable on our local hiking trails and learn more about the open spaces we enjoy while getting to know your Ioca1 rangers. Bikes are once a month on Sundays. Check the website for dates and details. lolunteer Trail Work Days lolunteers assist City Rangers on specific sections )f the open space in need of maintenance. Bring turdy, close -toed shoes, a snack and plenty of Vvater. Tools will be provided. Long pants and long sleeves are recommended. Check the website for updates. Rain will cancel, Suturduy Workdoys All Saturday Workdays run from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm. ■ Sept 8 Bishop Peak — Meet at Patricia trailhead, near the intersection of Patricia Dr and Anacapa Cir. Clear water bars and drains from the trailhead to the pond. • Oct 13 Irish Hills — Meet at Prefumo canyon rd trailhead, .3 mile past Castillo court leaving town. Clear drains on Mariposa trail. • Nov 17 Stenner Springs — Maintenance on the Eucs and Stenner Flow trails. • Dec 8 Bishop Peak — Meet at Patricia trailhead, near the intersection of Patricia and Anacapa. Pulling invasive weeds. Wednesday Workdays Meeting every Wednesday at 8:45 AM., this is an opportunity for volunteers to gather and work on building new trai Is in City - owned open space, Please check the website for the weeks location. For more information contact Sr, Park Ranger Doug Carscaden at 781-7302 or email drarscaden@slocity.org, Stats Snapshot Parking Services Neighborhood Summary ��!171e • • • 1 No Residential Permit 1,319 Overtime Parking 792 Prohibited Parking 481 Blocking Fire Hydrant 108 18 Inches from Curb / Facing Wrong Way 58 Fire Lane 48 ■ No Residential Permit ■ Overtime Parking a Prohibited Parking ■ Blocking Fire Hydrant 0 18 Inches from Curb / Facing Wrong Way Fire Lane Stats Snapshot cont. Neighborhood Code Enforcement February 1- June 30, 2018 a Visible Storage: 56 a Waste Containers: 96 ■ Vegetation: 50 . Fence: 2 a Furniture on Roof: 0 m Other: 14 160 140 120 100 80 i 60 40 20 111MI ■■ Feb -18 Mar -18 Noise Complaints February 1- June 30, 2018 Yard Parking: 32 j■ May -18 4 Complaint 4 Citation 1 DAC Warning ■ Unable to Locate 6 Negative Violation Jun -18 Neighborhood Officer Program The Neighborhood Officer Program is an excellent way to get connected with SLO PD. Patrol officers are assigned to each neighborhood and assist with ongoing concerns or problems that may be happening in your area of the city. Neighborhood Officers can help with neighborhood specific crime prevention and assist with establishing !Neighborhood Watch groups. Contact your Neighborhood Officer via the City's website, For emergencies, please ca119_1_1. San Luis Obispo Police Neighborhood Officers 2 Miles Last Updated: 1 /12/201 a ' n t w SLOGlS asy0 .Ni ia�ar�mion�a� s y `e ■ C R E E K D A Y t VMW-Cr� y.org Sa,<Lufs G7,r C-0 CREEK DAY CLEANUP Let's get together and TEWLMON ARROYO GRANDE clean up the creeks! 206 Fifth Street 229 Stanley Avenue Hosted by Tampleton Comm, Services Hosted by Ciky Of Arroyo Grande and Join family, friends, and neighbors at District and Upper Sai as Las Tobin RCE) Central Coast Salmon Enhancement this fun volunteer event. mjohnson@templetoncsdorg (805) 434-4914 kheflQman@o)atrroyogrande wg Cleaning the creeks helps protect our ATASCADERO (805) 473-5420 or wildlife and improves the beauty of AMWC Yard 6575 Sycamore Rd. chris@centralcoastsalmon com our county. rail is an Important time Hosted byAtaseaderoMutudwater Co. NIPOMO to remove trash before winter rains and City ofAtascadero TefftandCHIADSts, eutofHwy 101 arrive and wash debris and trash into amwc. (805) 4645347 Hosted by County of San Luls Obispo the ocean. CAL POLY rmundsoco-Ama.us Campus Market (805) 781-5259 PLEASE CHECK IN Hosted byEnvtcnrt•�,,."aSafety PASO ROBLES kbusby@calpo[y.edu (805)756-6664 L �rryyMoore Part Rrverbw*Ln. at one of these seven SAN LUIS OBISPO Hosfcd byC�ty of past Roblas stations on Santa Rosa Park (e05)227.7241 dfncaro�lprcitycam Saturdaymorning Hosted by City of San Luis Obispo 9 foUnOslocity.org (805) 781-7511 VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDI "'o Y n.r.ar cen.r -- CALPOLY .9 W , 0 Ol o � 9 9 � �. OJ �° � � o\° o\° e c U It a) to OOq Qi C O l0 e-1 M C n O O v L c00cr V) N r�L U � N M N N .�-1 _v t 00 cli 1 ctf C aOJ � t N 72 V w N N CL n U i CN mu L CU � 44 O U ateao -0 F— M (DHu F— 0 C7 F— F�— 0 U c Ln N LD LD I� LD ri ul K1 00 0) = Ln -I = O � LD 01 1'z 00 N rl- r Ln r -I N O O00 p N l0 m .1 m Ln rn O rn Ln m O � N f0 C N (0 C ri N O -I N La. Ln a -I Ln N O 00 o"o N O le N n N � 01 O^ O � N N cu U wino O O l6 @ N ^ tw \ \ o\° e c U Lei CFy ~ � OOq Qi cii QiE C O O O v L c00cr V) N H U v Ln 1.4 _v 00 cli 1 ctf C aOJ U N 72 V w N N CL n i CN mu L CU � 44 O � ateao -0 F— M (DHu F— Ln C7 F— F�— C) C) o m wino O O O ^ 01 \ \ o\° e Lei CFy ~ � OOq 4+ cii C O O O L c00cr V) of M N 5> C 00 Ln 1.4 M N _v 00 N cli 00 U w m ri N Q00 mu L 44 O � Q -0 tib M m U r _ 0 U = Q = (= = Q 00 rl- Ln I. O N l0 rn Ln m O � N (0 C O Ln N 3 Ln N n O � N C) C) o m wino y N Lei CFy ~ � o 00 4+ cii v L c00cr V) of M N 5> cu Lri M _v 00 N Q 00 U w Q N Q00 44 O � Q -0 tib M m r _ 0 = Q = (= = Q C) C) o m r-1 N n Lfi O 00 N m M M n i Oi wino y N Lei CFy ~ � o 00 cii y C 00 ^r of M N 5> Lri 00 d' 00 i 7 N O M cn r-1 N n Lfi O 00 N m M M n i Oi